Fat Biking and training effects- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    22

    Fat Biking and training effects

    Hello everyone,


    This topic has been on my mind for about two years now. I'll give the general question first, then my hypothesis pertaining to this question, and also offer some supplemental questions with regards to my general question. After these questions, I offer some background explanation to my questions in this whole thread. (Bear with me.)


    The general question:
    How would you evaluate/compare the training effects/benefits of fat biking against "normal biking" (read: with a bike with 'normal' tires, be it mtb or road bike, and in any terrain from asphalt to whatever)?


    Hypothesis:
    Would owning and riding a fat bike lead to these effects: for instance, fat bikes should offer higher rolling resistance leading to increased muscular and cardiovascular efforts while simultaneously avg. speed would stay lower than with 'normal bikes'.


    Supplemental questions:
    (a) How would you compare your heart rates, leg power used, and avg. speeds between fat biking and 'normal biking'? (If you want to share some objective measurements, they are welcomed but not necessary - after all, this is not a clinical/scientific investigation .)


    (b) What is your subjective or perceived effort of cycling session: fat bike vs. 'normal' bike (for example, concerning the above parameters)?


    (c) Would you recommend to anyone buying a fat bike solely for the 'reasons' given in the general question and hypothesis?


    My background (shortly put): I would consider myself as an athletic type who likes to cross-train in various sports (i.e. soccer, racket sports, cycling, weight training, cross-country skiing). My specs are around 178 cm/100 kg. I have little to none experience in fat biking. What has generated my (tentative) interest in fat biking is mainly the fact that though love outdoor cycling a lot (especially in the summertime), I have had some crashes (fortunately resulting only in minor injuries). These crashes (one of them starting from "death wobble" in a downhill (a road cycling accident)) has made me awfully fearful and timid in my cycling so that when speed accumulates, I tend to brake and slow down automatically. Obviously and especially, in smooth terrain, this results in awkwardness and, more importantly, in a lesser training effect (in terms of decreased heart rate, reduced avg. speed, etc., you know the drill).

    Thank You all!

    P.S. I reckon some of this might relate to the thread "Fat Biking and health (see https://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/fa...922626-44.html). But when I scrolled couple of pages of that thread I didn't seem to find what I was looking for. So I hope this is not a redundant thread.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    175
    As a personal fitness professional/trainer, Iíd say your hypothesis is pretty much spot-on. A fatbike compared to a similarly equipped ďregularĒ mountain bike is going to be heavier and have increased rolling resistance. Hence, at the same speed, a fatbike is going to require more energy expenditure, higher heart rates, etc. The result is that a fatbiker is typically going to be moving a little slower than his/her ďregularĒ mtb riding friends, but getting an equivalent training effect. If traveling at the same speeds, the fatbiker will be getting an increased training effect. Now, some might say that they can build a fully-carbon fatbike (especially including carbon wheels) that is close to the weight and efficiency of a ďregularĒ mtb...but then, an ďequivalently equippedĒ regular mtb would raise the bar even more, so an efficiency gap would remain.

    My experience has been that, as a fit, but ďolderĒ rider, the big fatbike tires soften trail hits in a desirable way. This is enhanced even more if using a suspension fork. My slightly arthritic wrists and hands feel better on a fatbike than when riding a ďregularĒ mtb on similar terrain. If an enhanced training effect is your primary goal in investing in a mountain bike, then, yes, Iíd say getting a fatbike makes perfect sense.

  3. #3
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6,855
    Quote Originally Posted by BasRice View Post
    Hello everyone,


    This topic has been on my mind for about two years now. I'll give the general question first, then my hypothesis pertaining to this question, and also offer some supplemental questions with regards to my general question. After these questions, I offer some background explanation to my questions in this whole thread. (Bear with me.)


    The general question:
    How would you evaluate/compare the training effects/benefits of fat biking against "normal biking" (read: with a bike with 'normal' tires, be it mtb or road bike, and in any terrain from asphalt to whatever)?


    Hypothesis:
    Would owning and riding a fat bike lead to these effects: for instance, fat bikes should offer higher rolling resistance leading to increased muscular and cardiovascular efforts while simultaneously avg. speed would stay lower than with 'normal bikes'.


    Supplemental questions:
    (a) How would you compare your heart rates, leg power used, and avg. speeds between fat biking and 'normal biking'? (If you want to share some objective measurements, they are welcomed but not necessary - after all, this is not a clinical/scientific investigation .)


    (b) What is your subjective or perceived effort of cycling session: fat bike vs. 'normal' bike (for example, concerning the above parameters)?


    (c) Would you recommend to anyone buying a fat bike solely for the 'reasons' given in the general question and hypothesis?


    My background (shortly put): I would consider myself as an athletic type who likes to cross-train in various sports (i.e. soccer, racket sports, cycling, weight training, cross-country skiing). My specs are around 178 cm/100 kg. I have little to none experience in fat biking. What has generated my (tentative) interest in fat biking is mainly the fact that though love outdoor cycling a lot (especially in the summertime), I have had some crashes (fortunately resulting only in minor injuries). These crashes (one of them starting from "death wobble" in a downhill (a road cycling accident)) has made me awfully fearful and timid in my cycling so that when speed accumulates, I tend to brake and slow down automatically. Obviously and especially, in smooth terrain, this results in awkwardness and, more importantly, in a lesser training effect (in terms of decreased heart rate, reduced avg. speed, etc., you know the drill).

    Thank You all!

    P.S. I reckon some of this might relate to the thread "Fat Biking and health (see https://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/fa...922626-44.html). But when I scrolled couple of pages of that thread I didn't seem to find what I was looking for. So I hope this is not a redundant thread.
    I can tell you this...

    I had heart surgery in 2014. Following that event I show up for a followup visit with my cariologist and heart surgeon, fatbike in tow.
    The receptionist was in disbelief seeing the clown sized tires on this bike in the waiting room and says something to Doc as I was leaving, post visit. Doc comes out to have a close look and be sure that he's not hallucinating. Doc breaks out an Rx pad and writes the script. Doc also let me off the hook for cardiac rehab, provided I follow the script

    Ride 4 times weekly, 1.5 hours each time.

    That speaks volumes as there is no appreciable damage or degradation following the M.I. that required the surgery in the first place.
    The other fringe benefit to fatbike use is that you will be converted from a 4 cylinder to a V8 when you hop on a regular tire bike! Bonus!!!

    Also what Fitman said!
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    263
    Plus they look so damned cool.

  5. #5
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6,855
    Quote Originally Posted by timsmcm View Post
    Plus they look so damned cool.
    Only reason ir excuse I can think of atm is 'cause they are!
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,965
    Yes riding a fat bike will be marginally harder than a similarly equipped bike with skinny Wheelset. Iíve ridden almost exclusively a fat bike for the last 7years. Novel at first, then preferred the line choices and variation it afforded me. Fitness built so that I could hang with all my regular riding buddies. Now on a 2nd lighter fat bike I can and do out ride them no matter the distance though they do more miles a year than I.

    When leading Iím regularly pedaling away full tilt and they comment about either soft pedaling or coasting behind me.

    For a few rides after switching to my wide winter Wheelset I can feel the difference and usually drop to the back of the pack. The effect is real.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    22
    Thank you guys for the replies!

    BansheeRune & timsmcm: Can't argue with the badass looks of a fat bike

    BansheeRune: Thanks for sharing your personal story and benefits with riding a fat bike. Good to hear things have turned up so nicely!

    FitmanNJ: Thanks for the analysis in response to my hypothesis/question! (It's always nice to have your hypotheses confirmed by someone else ) I wouldn't argue with your conclusions. And there are, as you mentioned, some additional benefits like the huge tires softening hits etc.

    It would be interesting to see some "objective" comparisons between, for instance, the same route ridden with regular mtb vs. with fat bike. Of course, fully identical comparisons in real-life situations are almost impossible because there are so many variables that need controlling (i.e., weather conditions, rider-related parameters). But I guess some kind of comparisons could be made.

    Any further perspectives, opinions, data are warmly welcomed! Thanks again!

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    22
    bme107:

    Thanks for your input. So +1 for the (somewhat common-sense) hypothesis that "fat biking is harder than "regular riding" ".

    If I may ask: What kind of wheelsets are you using with your fat bike?

  9. #9
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6,855
    Quote Originally Posted by BasRice View Post
    bme107:

    Thanks for your input. So +1 for the (somewhat common-sense) hypothesis that "fat biking is harder than "regular riding" ".

    If I may ask: What kind of wheelsets are you using with your fat bike?
    You have had quite a few +1's! Simply put, a fatbike ride of 20 miles or so can be the equivalent of a 75 mile road bike ride.
    Open the throttle to the point that you start to feel the effort going in and reap the benefits, and you can go Jeepin too, bonus!
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeRune View Post
    You have had quite a few +1's! Simply put, a fatbike ride of 20 miles or so can be the equivalent of a 75 mile road bike ride.
    Open the throttle to the point that you start to feel the effort going in and reap the benefits, and you can go Jeepin too, bonus!
    True, quite a few +1's already Thanks again for the analogy between riding fatbike and road bike (20 miles CAN equal 75 miles, respectively).

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mschafer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    52
    There are multiple factors at work. Depending on the surface and also tire pressure you might not be expending much more power than on a regular 29Ē wheel. I would choose a bike depending on the terrain youíll be riding. Iím on Long Island, ride the beach on occasion and forest trails that do frequently have sand, so a fat Bike made sense to me. It rides very well and fast on harder packed trails and due to the thickness of the tire it bounces nicely over obstacles (like a full suspension). But I really feel the drag when on pavement. If youíre riding in more hill environment I actually would consider an Ebike these days, help on the uphill is always fun. But in most environments Iím guessing a ďregularĒ MTB or a plus size might be better suited and cheaper. A friend is running a single speed 27.5Ē all the time, clipped in, and loves the challenge. The sand traps slow him seriously down, though. Itís all about the fun factor, weight (transport) should be a part of this too.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CanuckMountainMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    139
    Also worth mentioning, if you ride in an area that gets a lot of snow and ice in the Winter,
    a good set of studded fat tires gets you Outside all year round in almost any conditions
    ...as opposed to riding a boring indoor trainer waiting for the snow to melt.

    I bought my first Fatty primarily to extend my riding season (6-7 months of Winter here)
    Now my regular mountain bike has been collecting dust for the last 2 years, and I bought 2 more Fat Bikes instead.

    Wifey Loves it too after her First ride!
    ...Makes it way easier to buy more Bikes (N+1)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fat Biking and training effects-trek-ride-1.jpg  

    2020 Farley 9.6 Matte Olive
    2020 Farley 7 ROARange
    2018 Farley 7 Viper Red

  13. #13
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6,855
    Quote Originally Posted by BasRice View Post
    True, quite a few +1's already Thanks again for the analogy between riding fatbike and road bike (20 miles CAN equal 75 miles, respectively).

    A fatbike is akin to a 4x4 with 38's and a road bike, a Porsche... One hauls ass, one crawls over everything with ease. The Porsche gets good fuel economy, the 4x4 gets piss poor fuel economy. My Mayor gets around 7 or 8 miles per sammich! For a good training, a fatbike with its big, fat, sweet tires only requires putting more throttle into the ride and keeping the speed up some. It is also a blast to be able to veer off on a singletrack without a second thought and explore. Frankly, I would not give up my Mayor since that bike is so much fun to ride regardless of in town or out on a trail.
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  14. #14
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6,855
    Quote Originally Posted by mschafer View Post
    There are multiple factors at work. Depending on the surface and also tire pressure you might not be expending much more power than on a regular 29Ē wheel. I would choose a bike depending on the terrain youíll be riding. Iím on Long Island, ride the beach on occasion and forest trails that do frequently have sand, so a fat Bike made sense to me. It rides very well and fast on harder packed trails and due to the thickness of the tire it bounces nicely over obstacles (like a full suspension). But I really feel the drag when on pavement. If youíre riding in more hill environment I actually would consider an Ebike these days, help on the uphill is always fun. But in most environments Iím guessing a ďregularĒ MTB or a plus size might be better suited and cheaper. A friend is running a single speed 27.5Ē all the time, clipped in, and loves the challenge. The sand traps slow him seriously down, though. Itís all about the fun factor, weight (transport) should be a part of this too.
    Also of note; tire choice can make or break the fuel economy of a fatty in a massive way! Rolling resistance etc.
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,965
    Quote Originally Posted by BasRice View Post
    bme107:

    If I may ask: What kind of wheelsets are you using with your fat bike?
    Nate and Hodag on Marge Lites.
    Bud on Clownshoe and 4.8Minion FBF on Rolling Darryl.
    4.0 Jumbo Jims on 65mm Carbon.

  16. #16
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    33,472
    I do a lot of training on my fatbikes, hill climbs, etc. I'd like to think it makes me stronger cuz "it's hard", but really, it doesn't work like that. Increasing watts, VO2max, doing intervals, etc., that's the stuff that makes you faster and better. Whatever bike you ride, you have an incredible ability to "right-size" your output and adapt to it. You can ride bikes to and from work, with significant vertical and miles, every day, and still never be in the same arena as a mid-pack sport rider. With the fat-bike, you'll notice it's harder to accelerate, especially from lower speeds, you will probably tire out faster/ride shorter, etc.

    Put it another way, to actually get better/faster/stronger, you have to get uncomfortable. You hit a wall doing non-exerting rides and the only way to get stronger/faster is to put yourself into those uncomfortable situations, like intervals and HR-based training. It doesn't matter what kind of bike this is on. Riding a fat-bike won't make you faster or stronger, it makes you slower. You only get faster by getting into that uncomfortable region.

    HR and leg power completely independent of what bike you ride/train on IME. They are dependent on how hard you train, on any bike.

    As far as "death wobble", IME, fat-bikes are worse for this. Imbalances in the tires are more significant (further away from the center of rotation). Tubed tires are especially troublesome sometimes, to get exactly "straight" so they won't wobble. Also, if you are doing big ups and downs where you get going fast (I am, like I said above, for training), it's harder bringing those heavy wheels to a stop, so you better have some good sized brakes. Since I'm going out and doing 3-4K vert every other day on it, I've got an 8" on the front and 7" on the rear. The fat tires handle the DH road bumps better, but not the DH speed. In short, I don't think these are as stable or capable as speed increases, road bikes are the polar opposite and they are able to go downhill on roads MUCH faster, obviously way less wind resistance (that's the biggest factor), but I think it's easier to spin up their wheels without experiencing the balance issues that fat-tires have. I can still do 40+mph downhill on roads, but sometimes it's kinda sketchy to do so...Easier on snow though.

    I also do gravel races on the fatty (one coming up this weekend). Wind resistance is FAR more of an issue than any rolling resistance. I do notice a significant difference between gravel and pavement in terms of rolling resistance, but wind resistance is what limits me as I approach 20mph on level ground, not rolling.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    22
    Thanks for the input mschafer, much appreciated!

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by CanuckMountainMan View Post
    Also worth mentioning, if you ride in an area that gets a lot of snow and ice in the Winter,
    a good set of studded fat tires gets you Outside all year round in almost any conditions
    ...as opposed to riding a boring indoor trainer waiting for the snow to melt.

    I bought my first Fatty primarily to extend my riding season (6-7 months of Winter here)
    Now my regular mountain bike has been collecting dust for the last 2 years, and I bought 2 more Fat Bikes instead.

    Wifey Loves it too after her First ride!
    ...Makes it way easier to buy more Bikes (N+1)
    That's a good point and also relevant because I indeed happen to live in a place with snow and ice in the winter.

    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeRune View Post
    A fatbike is akin to a 4x4 with 38's and a road bike, a Porsche... One hauls ass, one crawls over everything with ease. The Porsche gets good fuel economy, the 4x4 gets piss poor fuel economy. My Mayor gets around 7 or 8 miles per sammich! For a good training, a fatbike with its big, fat, sweet tires only requires putting more throttle into the ride and keeping the speed up some. It is also a blast to be able to veer off on a singletrack without a second thought and explore. Frankly, I would not give up my Mayor since that bike is so much fun to ride regardless of in town or out on a trail.
    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeRune View Post
    Also of note; tire choice can make or break the fuel economy of a fatty in a massive way! Rolling resistance etc.
    Good analogies BansheeRune. Indeed tire choice plays remarkable role.

    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    Nate and Hodag on Marge Lites.
    Bud on Clownshoe and 4.8Minion FBF on Rolling Darryl.
    4.0 Jumbo Jims on 65mm Carbon.
    Bme107: Thanks for the info

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I do a lot of training on my fatbikes, hill climbs, etc. I'd like to think it makes me stronger cuz "it's hard", but really, it doesn't work like that. Increasing watts, VO2max, doing intervals, etc., that's the stuff that makes you faster and better. Whatever bike you ride, you have an incredible ability to "right-size" your output and adapt to it. You can ride bikes to and from work, with significant vertical and miles, every day, and still never be in the same arena as a mid-pack sport rider. With the fat-bike, you'll notice it's harder to accelerate, especially from lower speeds, you will probably tire out faster/ride shorter, etc.

    Put it another way, to actually get better/faster/stronger, you have to get uncomfortable. You hit a wall doing non-exerting rides and the only way to get stronger/faster is to put yourself into those uncomfortable situations, like intervals and HR-based training. It doesn't matter what kind of bike this is on. Riding a fat-bike won't make you faster or stronger, it makes you slower. You only get faster by getting into that uncomfortable region.

    HR and leg power completely independent of what bike you ride/train on IME. They are dependent on how hard you train, on any bike.

    As far as "death wobble", IME, fat-bikes are worse for this. Imbalances in the tires are more significant (further away from the center of rotation). Tubed tires are especially troublesome sometimes, to get exactly "straight" so they won't wobble. Also, if you are doing big ups and downs where you get going fast (I am, like I said above, for training), it's harder bringing those heavy wheels to a stop, so you better have some good sized brakes. Since I'm going out and doing 3-4K vert every other day on it, I've got an 8" on the front and 7" on the rear. The fat tires handle the DH road bumps better, but not the DH speed. In short, I don't think these are as stable or capable as speed increases, road bikes are the polar opposite and they are able to go downhill on roads MUCH faster, obviously way less wind resistance (that's the biggest factor), but I think it's easier to spin up their wheels without experiencing the balance issues that fat-tires have. I can still do 40+mph downhill on roads, but sometimes it's kinda sketchy to do so...Easier on snow though.

    I also do gravel races on the fatty (one coming up this weekend). Wind resistance is FAR more of an issue than any rolling resistance. I do notice a significant difference between gravel and pavement in terms of rolling resistance, but wind resistance is what limits me as I approach 20mph on level ground, not rolling.
    Jayem: Valid points made there. One needs to go to the out-of-comfort-zone in order to improve.

    While I would agree that HR and leg power are quite dependent on how hard one trains (I totally understand the point you make), I'm not sure they are totally independent of the kind of bike: For example, one might ride (somewhat extreme comparison) a high-end road bike for 50 miles and then change to a heavy front-suspension fat bike with 5,05 inch slowest rolling fat tires around there. Supposedly there is quite a difference between riding these two bikes, let's say 20 mph for 40 miles. Of course, one might choose to ride the fat bike so slowly (easily) that it does not raise one's HR or use of leg power very much. In the same fashion, one might choose to ride the high-end road bike needing more effort than the sluggish fat bike. This would prove the point of "independence" of HR and leg power from different kinds of bikes. But if one compares, for instance, the same submaximal effort needed to ride 2 hours with 20 mph high-end road bike vs. a sluggish fat bike, the HR and leg power needed would be higher with the fat bike.

    But again, I understand your point.

    Thank you Jayem also for addressing the "death wobble" effect. I would agree with your contention that fat bikes might actually be worse than road bikes in this regard (i.e., more unstable, more wind-resistance).

    Finally, nice to hear contemplations concerning rolling resistance vs. wind resistance. And, good luck for your race Jayem (if it is still in the future ).

  19. #19
    Rippin da fAt
    Reputation: BansheeRune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6,855
    I can see the tire's size and weight augmenting the death wobble at speed. Kinda like a Jeep with shot ball joints!
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jseis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    182
    Iím in my 7th year of beach riding and have ridden about every type of sand as in as hard as 5000 psi concrete and as soft as quick sand (that stopped me cold, buried my front wheel, and unceremoniously threw me over the bars armpits deep).

    Iíve developed low speed leg strength for the grind in the normal soft stuff. I gave up the 3-5 psi on the back and 2-4 psi up front and settled on about 8 psi both ends as when the hard sand appears I want to make better time. I discovered the geometry of my Minnesota 3.0 loads the front just enough to plow the tire in soft stuff. Moved the seat back and kick my ass back and the front floats better and the rear tracks better in the fronts slightly compressed path. I run BFLs with the knobs shaved off as Iíve plenty of traction on sand.

    I agree with HIIT though I limit myself to once a week. I can tell Iíve gained some modest stroke volume though Iím also careful to not push my HR to 170 as was typical up till last year (Iím 65). I can ride consistently at 139-140 HR and Iím ok with that though sub 133 HR is almost lolly gagging. Iíve no perspective on snow.

    I rarely ride my other bikes (GF Wahoo, Defy 1, Colnago Dream, Motobecane GJ) as the beach has low vehicle use and most at 25 mph. The Fat can be brutal training at low speed in the wide open spaces. The end result is endurance training. Less spinning up for super fast downhill runs or attacks. More astute condition assessment (drift, trash, boards with nails, sand condition) but far less situational awareness i.e., with respect to fast movers coming up or narrow roads on tight curves. I even rode my Fat in the STP a few years ago. Then I created my version of a beach TT and covered 16.5 miles in 65 minutes....that gassed me.

    I switched to Jones H bars to help with avoiding ruts tossing me off and they are fab and give me 1 finger steering if I desire. But nonetheless upper arm strength pretty good overall from muscling the Fat around. Switched to flats from clipless and grew to really like them.

    My real reason for riding Fat on the beach was to avoid getting killed on the highway as the rise of distracted driving and boat towing RV's just made it highly probable that it wasn't if I was going to get hit, it was when. Too many narrow winding roads with wide vehicles and careless drivers.

    Fat Biking and training effects-img_0231.jpg

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeRune View Post
    I can see the tire's size and weight augmenting the death wobble at speed. Kinda like a Jeep with shot ball joints!
    BansheeRune: Yep!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jseis View Post
    Iím in my 7th year of beach riding and have ridden about every type of sand as in as hard as 5000 psi concrete and as soft as quick sand (that stopped me cold, buried my front wheel, and unceremoniously threw me over the bars armpits deep).

    Iíve developed low speed leg strength for the grind in the normal soft stuff. I gave up the 3-5 psi on the back and 2-4 psi up front and settled on about 8 psi both ends as when the hard sand appears I want to make better time. I discovered the geometry of my Minnesota 3.0 loads the front just enough to plow the tire in soft stuff. Moved the seat back and kick my ass back and the front floats better and the rear tracks better in the fronts slightly compressed path. I run BFLs with the knobs shaved off as Iíve plenty of traction on sand.

    I agree with HIIT though I limit myself to once a week. I can tell Iíve gained some modest stroke volume though Iím also careful to not push my HR to 170 as was typical up till last year (Iím 65). I can ride consistently at 139-140 HR and Iím ok with that though sub 133 HR is almost lolly gagging. Iíve no perspective on snow.

    I rarely ride my other bikes (GF Wahoo, Defy 1, Colnago Dream, Motobecane GJ) as the beach has low vehicle use and most at 25 mph. The Fat can be brutal training at low speed in the wide open spaces. The end result is endurance training. Less spinning up for super fast downhill runs or attacks. More astute condition assessment (drift, trash, boards with nails, sand condition) but far less situational awareness i.e., with respect to fast movers coming up or narrow roads on tight curves. I even rode my Fat in the STP a few years ago. Then I created my version of a beach TT and covered 16.5 miles in 65 minutes....that gassed me.

    I switched to Jones H bars to help with avoiding ruts tossing me off and they are fab and give me 1 finger steering if I desire. But nonetheless upper arm strength pretty good overall from muscling the Fat around. Switched to flats from clipless and grew to really like them.

    My real reason for riding Fat on the beach was to avoid getting killed on the highway as the rise of distracted driving and boat towing RV's just made it highly probable that it wasn't if I was going to get hit, it was when. Too many narrow winding roads with wide vehicles and careless drivers.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0231.JPG 
Views:	7 
Size:	127.0 KB 
ID:	1341405
    Jseis: Thanks for sharing your experiences with fat bikes and training effectiveness! It's always good to hear from different people!

    (I would have to concur with your opinion concerning the dangerousness of riding on highways (not to take anything away from road cyclists). I would also add the lousy road conditions into the equation, at least from the standpoint where I currently live. Even if lousy roads may not equal with dangerous they surely make riding road bikes very unattractive to me.)

    All the best!

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    704
    I'd rather see something coming at me than hope that someone is paying attention as they come up behind me.

    As far as roads go, I try to ride against traffic (there's got to be very little if I'm even going to ride there, usually just getting to and from trails), and I do ride sidewalks if there's not any pedestrians on them.

    The thing about fat is you can easily transition to the shoulder, and if it looks like a car or truck is not seeing you, you can bail into the ditch and generally remain upright, and ride away. And it's just a smoother and better workout with many more places to ride.


    As they say in Seattle (if not most places), it's not if, but when you get hit by a car.
    Dash Pt. State Park (Tacoma), Big Sky Montana during Snowboard Season, Duluth Mn, a couple of times of year incl. Xmas.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by Bumpyride View Post
    I'd rather see something coming at me than hope that someone is paying attention as they come up behind me.

    As far as roads go, I try to ride against traffic (there's got to be very little if I'm even going to ride there, usually just getting to and from trails), and I do ride sidewalks if there's not any pedestrians on them.

    The thing about fat is you can easily transition to the shoulder, and if it looks like a car or truck is not seeing you, you can bail into the ditch and generally remain upright, and ride away. And it's just a smoother and better workout with many more places to ride.


    As they say in Seattle (if not most places), it's not if, but when you get hit by a car.
    Very astute comment Bumpyride. Thanks!

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-26-2018, 01:27 PM
  2. Unintended side effects of owning a fat bike?
    By ou2mame in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 10-10-2014, 10:06 AM
  3. Winter mountain biking, not fat biking, on front range?
    By Training-Wheels in forum Colorado - Front Range
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-23-2013, 08:29 PM
  4. fat fat fatty fat fat fat
    By evilbeaver in forum Riding Passion
    Replies: 94
    Last Post: 12-10-2006, 01:23 PM
  5. Effects of training on blood tests... Dave Morris?
    By The Peddler in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-17-2005, 03:30 PM

Members who have read this thread: 80

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.