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  1. #1
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    Fat bike for a big guy

    I'm curious if a fat bike is for me as I have no experience with them and which one for my size and keeping the bike reasonably priced. I'm 6'1" 265#. I have been curious on the Surly Pugsley and Salsa Mukluk (Not $4,000 Carbon Fiber option). Or do I need to get my weight down before considering a fat bike? Are the two bikes mentioned good options, or should I consider any others in that price range or less, if I should even be looking right now?

    I currently have a Trek Marlin 6 that I should ride more, lol.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Youíd be better off on a Surly Ice Cream Truck rather than the Pugsley since it can fit wider wheels and bigger tiresand youíll want the extra flotation ability. The Mukluks are very nice bikes as well.

  3. #3
    fat guy on a little bike
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    local guy to me is 6'4" 280, and loves his XL Kona Wozo.

  4. #4
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    Motobocane Nightrain is serving me well.

    I'm 6'4" 265

  5. #5
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    Unless you are riding very soft trails your weight won't matter. As a fellow man of substance I ride 4" tires most of the time, 5" sometimes. Both are fine for local trails. If you plan to ride remotely bigger is better for everyone regardless of weight, but for urban riding on relatively packed trails bigger is not better. 4" is more than fine for sanding riding.

  6. #6
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    Thatís true, depends on his average trail conditions, the amount of snow and traffic the trails receive and the temperatures. I think itís far better to buy a bike that can fit the biggest tires available then just run more narrow tires if conditions warrant it. You can always go smaller on tires but it sucks if you find you need more float and your bike limits you going bigger. Iíve seen it happen to other local riders again and again.

  7. #7
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    Fair points. Though, to me, having the option for running 29+ in the summer is more important than the ability to run huge winter tires in the winter. A few years ago it took a while for the trails to get packed around here (Anchorage), but now there are so many enthusiastic bikers that it only takes a few days - so bigger tires only get you out a day or two before small tires in town.

  8. #8
    turtles make me hot
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    I'm 6'5" and 265. My fat bikes and my Krampus are my favorites. I don't even have anything with less than 3" tires anymore.

    New Pugs is nice as is the Ice Cream Truck.
    I like turtles

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stroganof View Post
    Fair points. Though, to me, having the option for running 29+ in the summer is more important than the ability to run huge winter tires in the winter. A few years ago it took a while for the trails to get packed around here (Anchorage), but now there are so many enthusiastic bikers that it only takes a few days - so bigger tires only get you out a day or two before small tires in town.
    I swap out 29er tires on mine, works great


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  10. #10
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    I appreciate everyone's input thus far and encourage more if anyone is willing. Thank you all

  11. #11
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    I am 270# riding an alloy rigid Fatboy with no issues....few extra PSI in the 26x4.6 tires but rides nice and comfy.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    I'm 6'5" and 265. My fat bikes and my Krampus are my favorites. I don't even have anything with less than 3" tires anymore.

    New Pugs is nice as is the Ice Cream Truck.
    I forgot all about the new, redesigned Pugsley. I was thinking about the old one. The OP should consider it as well.

  13. #13
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    Any of the quality Fat Bikes will work at 265lbs.

    Pugsley, although popular and historic as the first fat bike, might be at the end of it's design lifespan at least for a new bike purchase.

    The Surly Wednesday and Ice Cream Truck are modern Geometry and are based on wider hubs rather than having to have an asymmetrical wheel as on the Pugsley.

    The Salsa Mukluk seems to be modern geometry as well. If you buy a Mukluk used from a few years ago, I don't think those have modern Geometry.

    A great choice in alumium is the Trek Farley 5 which is modern Geometry and a Fat 27.5 wheel set.

    So, Pugsley is great if you are commited to that type of design, but on a new 'Buy' you can get some great modern geometry Fat bikes in the same $1500 to $2000 price range.

    Modern Geometry is usally defined as: shorter chain stay, longer top tubes/shorter stem, slacker headtube angles (usually 69 degrees or less).

    A lot of people think modern geometry is more fun, it makes going down rocky decents a bit easier as you have less worry of going over the handlebars because your weight is further back. Some might argue that a tradition geo will turn faster because of the steeper head tube, but you adjust quickly to the slacker headtube angle of Modern Geo and it all seems to workout.

  14. #14
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    6' 4" barefoot and 270 ready to ride.

    Original fat boy, it's taken a beating.

    Get a better rear hub, killed more than a few alloy drivers and pawls... and cassettes and chains. Have it dialed now and relatively happy with it. Discovered I tweaked the rear triangle pretty bad the other day when I sucked up the rear chain... first frame issue so far. Rides fine but no longer clears anything much bigger than a minion.

    I would think anything in size large from the major brands would do just fine. It will either be a trek in xl or a corvus for me next.

  15. #15
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    I was 240 when I started riding (after 2 years of 4x/week I am much less now). I'm on a fully rigid fat with 4" tires and that's all I ride anymore. It has taken a lot of abuse. I like that it offers some cushion without the hassle of servicing suspension. I travel for work and bring my bike with me. Leaving it with a shop for shock service is not conducive for my riding.

    If you are pondering brands, here is a list of options in the US, albeit not a complete list.
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...RTbKU/htmlview

  16. #16
    Wanna ride bikes?
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    Ice Cream Truck with 5.0's
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  17. #17
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    Great information, thank you!

  18. #18
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    I donít know anything about your local trails and snow so I wonít get specific about tire suggestions. Except for this: yes, 4.0 or smaller tires are fine for anyone on well compacted trails. However if you plan to ride any amount of fresh snow or tougher mixed snow conditions Iíd highly recommend a bike that can fit full size 4.8 or 5.0 (5ish) rear end. If youíre considering a suspension fork, and if you plan to ride at least moderately aggressively Iíd also highly recommend the Mastodon.

    I was 250 (a bit lighter now) and I used to ride an older rigid Mukluk with 4.0 tires. Now Iím on a 2018 mukluk with a Mastodon and bigger tires when the conditions warrant it.

  19. #19
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    Any reasonable fatbike will be fine with a big guy.

  20. #20
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    What's a mastodone?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by joker357 View Post
    What's a mastodone?
    . Itís a fork. But if youíre not looking for suspension, then just ignore me!

    https://manitoumtb.com/product/mastodon-pro/?cat_id=23

  22. #22
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    Thank you, I was originally thinking no suspension, but I'm not getting any younger, so a suspension may be in the cards. I'm still in research mode. Thanks again

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by joker357 View Post
    Thank you, I was originally thinking no suspension, but I'm not getting any younger, so a suspension may be in the cards. I'm still in research mode. Thanks again
    Lots of good choices...for me I'd say for a chub it's hard to beat a Farley 7 in 16 17 or 18..19 too. Used I'm talking. Add a Mast. Shock if you need one. I have 16 F7 and a 18 carbon 9.6. love them both but if all I had was the AL 7 life is still awesome as long as you have good wheels.
    2016 Remedy 9
    2016 Farley 7
    2017 Santa Cruz V-10 C
    2017 Remedy 9.9
    2017 Domane SLR 6

  24. #24
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    Others can speak up as to the quality, the Framed Alaskan Carbon appears to tick several boxes at the upper end of your range (currently on sale).
    carbon frame
    Mastadon suspension fork (or carbon non-sus)
    NX Eagle drivetrain
    27.5 wheels

  25. #25
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    khs 3000.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fat bike for a big guy-myride.jpg  


  26. #26
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    Any of you "full figured" folks ever bend your seatpost? I have a 2018 Blizzard (I've had it for one year). Just last weekend I was installing a Fox Transfer, when I noticed my stock seat post had a slight bend. Enough to see, but I could still insert it all the way into the seat tube with some force. A straight edge confirmed a slight bend.

    I am 6', 245 lbs and have never had this issue before. I am assuming perhaps it is the bouncing that frequently happens with a fatty (increasing the amount of force applied) that normally doesn't happen with a damped rear suspension bike.

    Anyway, just curious if anyone else has had this happen.

  27. #27
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by KThaxton View Post
    Any of you "full figured" folks ever bend your seatpost? I have a 2018 Blizzard (I've had it for one year). Just last weekend I was installing a Fox Transfer, when I noticed my stock seat post had a slight bend. Enough to see, but I could still insert it all the way into the seat tube with some force. A straight edge confirmed a slight bend.

    I am 6', 245 lbs and have never had this issue before. I am assuming perhaps it is the bouncing that frequently happens with a fatty (increasing the amount of force applied) that normally doesn't happen with a damped rear suspension bike.

    Anyway, just curious if anyone else has had this happen.
    One thing that I learned the hard way about frames and seatposts is that the "minimum insertion" is fairly meaningless. That's usually the minimum that will not bend the seatpost, but by using a longer seatpost, you are using a longer lever, giving more mechanical advantage and eventually, something will give. In this case, your frame was strong enough. In my case, it was not, despite running a TON of overlap way beyond the min insert. I was using a super-long 400+mm seatpost on a frame that was too effectively too small. So your seatpost-size to frame-size ratio can definitely be an issue.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  28. #28
    turtles make me hot
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    One thing that I learned the hard way about frames and seatposts is that the "minimum insertion" is fairly meaningless. That's usually the minimum that will not bend the seatpost, but by using a longer seatpost, you are using a longer lever, giving more mechanical advantage and eventually, something will give. In this case, your frame was strong enough. In my case, it was not, despite running a TON of overlap way beyond the min insert. I was using a super-long 400+mm seatpost on a frame that was too effectively too small. So your seatpost-size to frame-size ratio can definitely be an issue.
    Yes. I use a Thomson 410mm post in my XL frame. I WAS using a setback post and I was well within spec of the minimum insertion spec. Cracked my frame right where the seat tube and top tube meet.
    I like turtles

  29. #29
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    Yup. Two bent seatposts and three cracked frames (on the seat tube). All were technically well within proper insertion specs for both the post and the frame. Based on my past experiences I try to run a decently sized frame without having to resort to crazy long seat tube extension (lever arm). And a good length of overlap between seat post and frame. Then I ride (and pray).

  30. #30
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    I've had two frame failures at the seatstay/seattube and seattube/TT junctions. The latter was probably from a slightly small frame and using a seatpost with a lot of offset. Too much of a lever, probably.

    The second was a crack at the welds of the seat stays. That one was just a failure, I don't think the seatpost had anything to do with it.

    It's a high stress area for sure.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    I'm 6'5" and 265. My fat bikes and my Krampus are my favorites. I don't even have anything with less than 3" tires anymore.

    New Pugs is nice as is the Ice Cream Truck.
    I tried everything I could to on the Krampus to not get the rear tire to rub on the DS CS, don't get how others my size don't have this happen.

    Back on topic, whatever you get make sure it will accommodate 5" tires.

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