egg beater vs candy for snow- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    egg beater vs candy for snow

    Anyone have experience with these in the snow? I've always ridden SPDs but plan on going crank bros for my fatty. I'd prefer the candy because I like having a little extra pedal under my shoe. (Currently ride shimano XT Trail.) But, looks like the candy may ice up more easily than the eggbeater?

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    I have Candy SL's from many years ago. I have been binning them for platforms in the wintertime for years. Winter cycling boots are damn expensive. Platforms allow me to wear regular boots with warm socks. My feet are happy with this setup.

  3. #3
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    I'm buying the 45nrth wolvhammers. For me they're worth it because I regularly do night shifts on a pedicab in the dead of winter at 8500 feet in the Colorado Rockies. I need to be clipped in to do hills on a 700 pound tricycle

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by circlesuponcircles View Post
    I'm buying the 45nrth wolvhammers. For me they're worth it because I regularly do night shifts on a pedicab in the dead of winter at 8500 feet in the Colorado Rockies. I need to be clipped in to do hills on a 700 pound tricycle
    I should add this to my bucket list. 700 pound trike, up a hill at 8500 ft elevation. That is awesome, but who am i kidding, flat ground at sea level would be enough challenge for me. Cheers

  5. #5
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    You will want something with a nice platform in the snow. Doing a trackstand from stop in snow to instantly needing to put the power down is a typical situation in deep stuff.

    A friend of mine had eggbeaters and ditched them for a clipless shimano pedal with a larger platform.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rex615 View Post
    I should add this to my bucket list. 700 pound trike, up a hill at 8500 ft elevation. That is awesome, but who am i kidding, flat ground at sea level would be enough challenge for me. Cheers
    Ha! It's not as glamorous as it sounds-- but, it pays the bills! These boots are long over due considering that I've spent the last three years using "Boot Glove" Neopreme ski boot covers over my summer mtb shoes.

  7. #7
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    Depends largely on the snow, some snow is kind of warm and sticky, jamming crevices and the such. I never had any problem running standard shimano M520 pedals, the snow pushes through the mechanism, although it's not quite as open as crank brothers obviously. I did see a bit more trouble in the spring when it was a little more common for snow to pack around the cleat when you stepped down, still nothing that a 2nd attempt or good kick wouldn't usually fix.

    I will say this: Cleats are heat sinks connected to bigger heat sinks (metal pedals) which are usually connected to even bigger heatsinks. The whole idea of clipless pedals is to have a rigid to semi-rigid sole, which is where you get your support. It's also what prevents bloodflow because your foot doesn't flex at all (like when walking). Boots and flats don't exactly do this while you are pedaling, but at least when you get off to walk up a hill they do, and they provide far more insulating capacity than a pedal-cleat combination where the cleat is located close to your foot. When the temp really gets cold, most of the die-hard clipless pedal guys go to flats. Just way more freedom in boot choices and you don't need a $400 boot to stay decently warm. Slow-speed falls into snow kind of suck too, although I don't recall doing that last winter at all with my SPDs.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  8. #8
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    Candys for me unless the temps are below 0 F, then platforms. I'd say around Anchorage on group rides its 50/50 clipless versus flats. Unless it's real cold then not many clipless.
    Latitude 61

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by circlesuponcircles View Post
    I'm buying the 45nrth wolvhammers. For me they're worth it because I regularly do night shifts on a pedicab in the dead of winter at 8500 feet in the Colorado Rockies. I need to be clipped in to do hills on a 700 pound tricycle
    The problem isn't the insulation so much, it's the bloodflow.

    I'm counting on generator-brakes being invented soon that will be used to power a wide-range of mtb accessories, including motors, embedded pedal heaters, handlebar warmers, cell phone charger, etc...

    Until then, I got me some electric soles I slip into my Lakes and when it gets real cold huge cabela arctic boots.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  10. #10
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    I don't expect to ride in temps below 20*f that often. Also, I've got electric ski boot insoles! (Used to think they were just for softies, but when you ski 135 days a year, it's worth it!

  11. #11
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    I love the Crank Bros Mallets- the platform is huge, it's got traction pins and it grips your boot just fine if you don't hit the cleat the first time, which is awesome when you're in really variable conditions (which is what I've usually got).

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    I love the Crank Bros Mallets- the platform is huge, it's got traction pins and it grips your boot just fine if you don't hit the cleat the first time, which is awesome when you're in really variable conditions (which is what I've usually got).
    I've done that before too. Sometimes you can "roll" your foot foward and clip in. Sometimes the mech is top-dead-center and your foot effectively bounces off.

    OP: Remember that big insulated boots reduce your foots "feel" and "precision". I notice it's not as easy to clip back in wearing my boots vs. my summer shoes. I don't think this would necessarily affect the mallet more than the eggbeater and it's NOT a huge difference IME, but it's a difference nonetheless and I would say that what might seem obvious and easy in the summer can be a little more challenging with socks and bit honkin boots.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I've done that before too. Sometimes you can "roll" your foot foward and clip in. Sometimes the mech is top-dead-center and your foot effectively bounces off.

    OP: Remember that big insulated boots reduce your foots "feel" and "precision". I notice it's not as easy to clip back in wearing my boots vs. my summer shoes. I don't think this would necessarily affect the mallet more than the eggbeater and it's NOT a huge difference IME, but it's a difference nonetheless and I would say that what might seem obvious and easy in the summer can be a little more challenging with socks and bit honkin boots.
    That's what I love about the mallets- miss your clip and those traction pins take over.

    Just tried my mallets with my new Lake boots today for the first time after wearing light shoes all summer and man, that was a reminder in just what you said- big heavy boots really do reduce foot feel.

    Happy to say though, they clipped in just as good as ever.

  14. #14
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    My two cents FWIW?

    Ran Eggs for many years, significantly better for snow and ice build up issues.

    That said, always happily returned to SPD's come Spring.

    In the last two or three years though, I've found Eggs et al have taken a serious turn for the shoddy. Springs are too weak, I, and many folks I ride with, have started popping out on effort filled climbs (and if you've ever done that, you know it sucks big time). They seem to last a year, maybe year and a half before falling apart in some manner and needing to be sent off to CB's to get repaired. Great that they offer the service, but I shouldn't need to do that every year with a pair of $100 Eggs, when a $50 pair of Shimano 520's goes 5+ without breaking a sweat.

    That said, I made the switch to Time ATAC's, and have been extremely happy with the performance in snow and ice, and three years down, they are just as nice as the day they were born. Still switch back to SPD's come summer though, but it's with far less of a sense of urgency than it had been.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  15. #15
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    ran eggbeaters last year without issue, they never once iced up. Switched to candy3's this summer, i don't anticipate that icing will be an issue with them, either, but i still have the eggbeaters on my cross bike if it becomes a problem.

  16. #16
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    I can't speak about CBs pedals, but I do have Wolvhammers and can attest to their awesomeness. My feet get cold easily, and these boots have totally opened up winter riding for me. Easily worth the price tag imo.

  17. #17
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    I have broken 2 sets of candy's and a couple eggbeaters in the lower models, but I've ridden the same set of ti eggbeaters for the last 4 years and never an issue. (knock on wood.) They aren't cheap but haven't fallen apart after a pedal strike like the lower models.

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