The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures

    Springtime is the time for renewal....birds and bees are out doing their thing; while trees begin to bud and wildflowers push through the cold soils warmed by the March Sun. And on the trails, million of little thorns have broken away from their home branches to start a life of their own, burying themselves in my damned fatbike tires once again. This life cycle goes from Late February all the way to early June, where the last of these solitary thorns find their new living quarters in the tire carcass's of every bicycle that goes up and down our local trails here in NJ.

    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-100_3747.jpg
    Delaware and Raritan Canal Towpath Trail, 3 miles above the Lock 1 entrance at Bordentown, NJ, 17 March 2019. NJ does not have "goat heads" that seem to be home in the western part of the US. What we have here are sticker bushes and locust trees, both whose small branches and stems have needle-like thorns that go through a bike tire like a hot knife through butter. After years of being a tire tube-patch-on-the-trail person, I had enough last summer when I flattened out 3 times in one week. Even with Mr Tuffy Fatbike Tire Liners, these thorns would pierce through the tire carcass, through the tire liner and through the tube. So I went tubeless, using Zip System flashing tape, Orange Seal Sub Zero sealant and 2 new 4.0x26 Schwalbe Jumbo Jims. But to go tubeless means you need to carry some means of patching your tire should you ride over a thorn or nail or any other kind of sharp object we have on our roadways and trails. My other fatty, the Specialized Fatboy, continues on with the Mr Tuffy's....

    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-100_3748.jpg
    A check of my rear tire showed a classic NJ trailside thorn in the tire. The Orange Seal was doing it's job, so I continued on my ride in order to reach homebase where I would snap some pics of this tire plugging procedure for the benefit of the home viewer.

    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-100_3749.jpg
    Minus my tire levers, spare fat bike tube and stick-on tire patches for the traditional tube repairs not shown here, this is my tubeless tire patch kit gear carried on each trip. Lezyne air pump, Accugage 0-30 psi guage, spare Dynaplugs and the Dynaplug MegaPill tire patch repair kit.

    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-100_3751.jpg
    Here's the MegaPill opened up. It comes with spare dynaplugs and a small razor knife to cut off the excess plug once she's installed. The brass pointed end seems to be a cause for much worry as I reviewed other threads on the Dynaplug system on this site. Not sure if it's just arm-chair worry-warts overthinking things as folks seem to like to do. I figure if one is worried about that pointed end damaging their rims when air pressures are lowered down, they should be more worried about their rims actually bending into a pretzel if their tires are compressing right up into their rims and maybe consider it's time to air up.....
    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-100_3752.jpg
    In this photo, I removed a tire plug from it's stainless steel sheath. The plug material is very elastic and somewhat sticky, so I had to gently work it back into the sheath and ready it for insertion. Note the sheath threaded into the pill half, left corner. This plug insert will be unscrewed from the pill and that brass bullet plug screwed in and used for this installation. The rounded bullet plug is for a larger diameter hole. Dynaplug directions say a person can use 2-3 plugs in order to fill a hole. Of course, at that point, it may be necessary to break out the old fashioned tire tube....
    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-100_3754.jpg
    The MegaPill does not come with this stainless steel plug. The end of this thing is needle-sharp. I was able to dig out the thorn with it. This plug is used to stop as little air leakage as possible, saving you pump strokes on the trail. When you are ready to insert your plug, simply pull this and insert the tire plug into the hole.

  2. #2
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    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures Part 2

    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-100_3755.jpg
    Here's the thorn. Before going tubeless, this little thing would have flattened my tire in no time. My old Mr Tuffy fatbike liners have numerous holes punched through them. I should go into the garage and break them out, count the holes to see just how many road and trail side flat tires I've gotten from these lil' bastids.....

    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-100_3756.jpg
    Here's the DynaPlug ready to insert into the Jumbo Jim. Position the tool and plug insert straight up and down to the tire hole and you'll be good to go.....

    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-100_3757.jpg
    You just want to pierce the tire and go in a bit.....

    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-100_3758.jpg
    Pull the tool straight up and out, leaving the tip and elasto-rubber plug into the tire. The stainless sheath is ready for a new tire plug should you have ample spares with you.

    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-100_3759.jpg
    Even the little stainless plug-knife has it's own protective sheath. Here's the knife in action, cutting the plug flush with the tire......

    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-100_3760.jpg
    A little saliva over the plug shows no bubbles. A successful, first-time repair!

    In the time it took me to do up this thread, I could have made a dozen or so Dynaplug repairs. Realistically, the time frame for a trail side repair can be just minutes. A traditional tire tube trail side repair is another deal, one I just came to the point where I did not want to do anymore.

    The big drawback to the Dynaplug system is the cost. That Megapill system was 75 bucks. Add another 5 for the special stainless steel tire plug you will have to purchase separately. But think about it before balking at that cost.

    Cost of entry is a funny thing. We'll think nothing of 120 bucks for a Jumbo Jim Snakeskin tire, another 150 for a seat, or a dozen other ways where upgrading our bikes come at some crazy prices. To me, a 75 dollar purchase will pay for itself long term in just saving me the real hassle of doing a tire tube repair on the trail, especially in the cold weather months where one can be looking at hypothermia in the wrong situation. For me, it's an impressive bit of american engineering and ingenuity!

    Hope you enjoyed this little picture thread!

  3. #3
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    Looks very well thought out, and compact.

    Would the usual rubber "worm" inserts not work better (& faster) for larger holes?

    Are there smaller rubber "worms" for smaller holes that cost less than Dyna Plugs?

    wtf
    $60 for a five-pack of plugs?
    Dynaplug® Online Store | Dynaplug® Micro Pro - Tubeless Bicycle Tire Repair Kit


    "worms" from https://reviews.mtbr.com/how-to-set-...k-the-mechanic

    https://youtu.be/Ofd8uK5PmkQ?t=403
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  4. #4
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    Geez I feel bad I ordered a plug kit off Amazon for 9 bucks.
    :thumbsup:It doesn't matter what I ride as long as I ride it Rubber Side Down●~●.

  5. #5
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    TLDR, but I had several thorns larger than that after yesterday's ride through Allaire and just let Stan's seal them up with no problem.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by RockyJo1 View Post
    Geez I feel bad I ordered a plug kit off Amazon for 9 bucks.
    Maybe the DynaPlug target market is road bikes, where the container 'made from a solid aluminum billet' can be anodized to a custom colour that matches the colour of their pumps?

    ~edit
    (pump: device for pumping air into tube/tire. Not to be confused with "pumps".)
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  7. #7
    Hybrid Leftys aren't real Moderator
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    Why are you plugging? Wait till you're home, yank the offending object, rotate to get sealant to the hole, and be done with it.

    Were it a ~1/4" gash, I might start to consider repairing the tire. We see Hawthorns every where, and routinely yank them out, never had sealant not deal with it...

    Feeling like I'm missing something here.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  8. #8
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    I see the plugs as useful for big punctures, but more than likely if it's big enough that sealant won't work, putting in a tube is usually more time-effective, as you often have loss of sealant/dried sealant to contend with and I usually try the plugs out at home, although I've successfully used them once or twice on the trail. There's also the cuts that are just too big for a plug, but that can be successfully booted on the trail with a tube.

    Car tire plugs work just fine, you can get the "bike specific" ones, somehow I've bought way too many have seem to have a lifetime supply, but a tiny thorn like shown is usually handled just fine with sealant. I've gone to texas and came back with multiple large goatheads embedded. You just leave them and let the sealant do the job.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  9. #9
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    Sealant will fix that little thorn hole all by itself as soon as it's removed.

  10. #10
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    I don't bother messing with thorns (even the nasty honey locust thorns that are like nails stacked on nails) on the trail. Not worth the time. Even punctures caused by smaller sticks usually seal up fine with just sealant, a tire spin, and maybe topping up tire pressure. I gave up on those heavy-ass tire liners 15 years ago after a honey locust thorn made one look like paper.

    I bought a plug kit to deal with bigger holes. The sorts where there's a loss of rubber, caused by blunt sticks the size of my finger, that sealant won't touch. And even plugging isn't worth it if you're reasonably close to the trailhead. I bought a different dynaplug kit (with different-sized plugs) that's so tiny it might as well weigh nothing.

  11. #11
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    I bought this one.....$20.

    https://www.lezyne.com/product-tirer...ubelesskit.php

    But yeah, wouldn't bother for a thorn hole.

  12. #12
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    I have one of the $9 plug kits from Amazon. It uses much smaller versions of the bacon strips that one might use to plug a car tire. Multiple pieces can be used for larger holes. If for some reason sealant does not work, the plug is step 2. It weighs practically nothing and takes up no room compared to a tube.

    While I can justify just about anything, a $60 plug kit is just beyond my justification skills.

  13. #13
    fat guy on a little bike
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    i have the same kit. i love the little knife... after 3 plugs or so, i remove the tire and patch from the inside. (don't want the sharp plugs putting holes in my tape/rim strips).

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    Sealant will fix that little thorn hole all by itself as soon as it's removed.
    For tubeless, I leave them in, unless I'm just curious, but that often leads to leaking, especially when you do it at home where the sealant isn't being moved around.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  15. #15
    Hybrid Leftys aren't real Moderator
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    Funny story.

    Buddy ended up with a hole from *something*, and the sealant wasn't quite cutting it.

    Found a thorn, trail side, stuffed it in, shot in a little bit more sealant, aired him up and BAM.

    Held tight for the rest of the ride.

    So there, the things that give you flats, can also stop them!

    I leave thorns in if found when riding, but in the shop, pull them and get things sealed. Better to have them out, ultimately, in case you need to use a tube sometime for a bad tear, as all those thorns will then need to be found, and removed unless you wanna perforate your tube....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  16. #16
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    I have the same kit and was able to patch a sidewall on my BFL’s that allowed me to get home. The sealant did not touch it on the sidewall but the kit did the trick with just one plug. I’ll remove it and put a patch on it for summer.

    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-3b6a0ee0-be17-41b5-8cfe-965012fe37eb.jpg

    The Dynaplug Mega Pill Tire Repair Kit.....in pictures-26f31a74-e8c9-42af-82eb-86d5f5a40beb.jpg
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Nothing to see here, move along folks.

  17. #17
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    Guys, appreciate the feedback very much.

    I'm coming from a lifetime of riding on tubes up until last summer. The first impression on checking my tires yesterday on the trail is that the tubeless sealant system is a flat out winner. That itty bitty thorn would have had me doing a field patch of the holed tube before I even got off the trail & onto my 6 miles back to home on the local roadways, had I still been running on tubes.

    This was more a photo how-to on using a tire plugging system; especially geared towards those new to Tubeless tire systems and plugging kits. Your comments regarding letting the thorn stay in is noted; based on your collective experience running tubeless in all kinds of situations. All the same, I'm pretty satisfied with the ease of plugging the tire and just as soon have a rubber plug in place making a permanent repair versus keeping the thorn in and letting the sealant do it's thing. I'm to understand sealant has a life span inside the tire and must be renewed or topped off....

    Canoe: A check on Universal Cycles website shows a 5 pack of the tire plugs run from 8.99 for the larger bullet plugs to 9.99 for the smaller, brass tipped plugs. That high cost you quoted is for a complete kit.

    My bike rides range vary from 10 miles from homebase, up to 40; so I kinda like to be prepared for roadside issues. So even running tubeless, I carry a spare tube at all times.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTowpathTraveler View Post
    ...
    Canoe: A check on Universal Cycles website shows a 5 pack of the tire plugs run from 8.99 for the larger bullet plugs to 9.99 for the smaller, brass tipped plugs. That high cost you quoted is for a complete kit. ...
    ah ha
    o Add extra 5-pack of plugs $59.99
    I took that as add a 5-pack for $59.99, not as kit plus a 5-pack.
    my bad
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  19. #19
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    I don't know if it's available in the US but there's also the Sahmurai Sword that fits in to your bar ends https://sahmurai.com/ perhaps not quite as easily transferable between bikes but they are quite chunky bits of kit and easy to handle when wearing gloves.

    I've only ever had to fit one tyre plug - I think I rode over a 6" nail or something that sort of size - the sealant wouldn't work so in with the plug and pump the tyre back up and away. That was two years ago and the tyre is still going strong.

    As with others, unless the sealant isn't doing its job then I'll leave thorns in-situ. You do have to check very carefully if at some point you need to use a tube.

  20. #20
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    I checked for years and they were not available in the US. I wish they were, while I like the ‘pill’, it takes up valuable room in my seat bag.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Nothing to see here, move along folks.

  21. #21
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    It's a good tutorial and certainly educates those who don't know about these patch kits. My only comment is that a hole that size will seal up without a plug at all. Just remove the thorn and let the sealant do it's thing, that's what it's there for. The plugs are for holes that are to big for the sealant to fix on it's own, and they do a great job at that without having to remove the tire from the rim.

  22. #22
    All fat, all the time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    For tubeless, I leave them in, unless I'm just curious, but that often leads to leaking, especially when you do it at home where the sealant isn't being moved around.
    I leave them in as well.
    My best one, a stick the size of my thumb, I cut it flush with the mini saw on my Leatherman, and it held until I got back out of the woods a few miles.

  23. #23
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    Nice review, thanks. I think a lot of you guys are overly focused on the thorn while Mike is showing the plug system. Was it needed for this repair? Probably not but the point is the big pill itself.

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