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  1. #1
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    Don't put tubeless tires on and off too often....learn from my experience

    My fatbike came with Mulefut rims and Maxxis tires. Both tubeless ready. when new i set it up tubeless with some difficulty (it was my first time), but worked relatively easily. I didn't need to inflate the tire with a tube first to seat one side of the bed.

    Then for several reasons I took the tires off and on. I had to redo my tape, used studded tires on last winter.

    Every time I put the Maxxis tires back on it needed some more convincing. I needed to use more soapy water, had to put a 26" tube around and needed more cursewords.

    This week I started to put them back on again and nothing worked. The tire seemed stretched. It slid really easily over the rim and no convincing would keep the bed sealed enough to inflate with the compressor.

    I ultimately had to take the tubeless valve out, install a fattube and keep the tire inflated with tube over night. then I removed the tube (left one side seated) and with tire levers i pulled that off-tire side close to the rim after putting the 26" tube around the tire. I then held the wheel level so that the unseated side of the tire was at the bottom. nothing short of that would work. Thank goodness this did the trick, which includes every single trick I could find.

    From now on I leave that tire on till it is worn out. It really seems the tires stretch over time making tubeless installation more and more difficult.

    For the future I install a new tire and leave it be. If I ever want to do a studded set again, I better get a 2nd wheelset to avoid all the tire mounting.

    I don't care if anyone wants to learn from my experience. But my advice is to not remove tubeless fat tires unless you have a really good reason.
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  2. #2
    fat guy on a little bike
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    my advice is to not remove tubeless fat tires unless you have a really good reason.

  3. #3
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    How do I clean out the sealant already in their, I agree that taking them off and on will stretch them but if I need to clean them out do I use the injector to suck it out or take the tire off?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Pikachu View Post
    How do I clean out the sealant already in their, I agree that taking them off and on will stretch them but if I need to clean them out do I use the injector to suck it out or take the tire off?
    I have yet to notice any appreciable stretch in the bead of a bicycle tire that would prevent it for setting up tubeless.

    I have yet to clean sealant out of a tire for the sake of removing dried sealant. If I remove a tire for some other reason, I will clean the sealant out, otherwise it is not hurting anything.

  5. #5
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    My solution to this is to have 2 sets of wheels, a bit expensive but is just a quick wheel swap.

    Have one set with Bud/Lou for the winter and another with FBF/FBR for the rest of the year both tubeless on Mulefut 80s, Ringle tape and Orange sealant.

    The stanimals, dry sealant or what ever lives inside the tire remains there until there's a reason to break the seal.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiRt DeViL View Post
    The stanimals, dry sealant or what ever lives inside the tire remains there until there's a reason to break the seal.
    Don't put tubeless tires on and off too often....learn from my experience-img_2655%5B1%5D.jpg
    This guy was several years old. He was making too much noise and flopping around when I was carrying the bike into the house.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiRt DeViL View Post
    My solution to this is to have 2 sets of wheels, a bit expensive but is just a quick wheel swap.
    Does each rear wheel have their own cassette? How do you accommodate for chain wear?
    Remember, nobody knows. So let's find out...

  8. #8
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    Every rim and tire combo is different and the tire will stretch as well over time subjected air pressure. The tricks to get the mulefut seated are normal and a bit of PITA. With tubeless you sometimes have to use all the tricks. My lightbike carbon 65s take just a few minutes to change due to the inside wall design.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by theGliberal View Post
    Does each rear wheel have their own cassette? How do you accommodate for chain wear?
    Cassettes and chains wear at different rates. I have 3 wheels & cassettes and swap freely on the same chain with zero issues.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by theGliberal View Post
    Does each rear wheel have their own cassette? How do you accommodate for chain wear?
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Cassettes and chains wear at different rates. I have 3 wheels & cassettes and swap freely on the same chain with zero issues.
    What BlueCheese said. Get a chain wear indicator tool or measure with a ruler. Replace the chain when needed so that it doesn't wear out the cassette prematurely.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by theGliberal View Post
    Does each rear wheel have their own cassette? How do you accommodate for chain wear?
    I have 6 different rear wheels....all with their own various sized cassettes.
    Zero issues....don't let your chain turn to junk.

  12. #12
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    I've gotten a little stretch out of my D5s out of the year, makes it EASIER to seat them, not harder. What makes it harder is the nipple-holes where the tape sinks into the hole and allows the air to escape past the bead. I've gotten pretty good at offsetting this, but it's occasionally an issue with tubeless tires in general for me. IME, the carbon rims do better than the extruded rims, save for the occasional nipple-hole issue.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  13. #13
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    I've never had issues with all brands of tires and have had them on and off 10 times for changing conditions or retaping

  14. #14
    Rollin' a fatty Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by theGliberal View Post
    Does each rear wheel have their own cassette? How do you accommodate for chain wear?
    Not that is necessary but for the time being swap cassette, will start a new combo (cassette, chain, ring) when the summer wheels get in and will have another just for winter use, this way the marriage between components is taken care off.

  15. #15
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    Iíll add this to the list of reasons I wonít go tubeless until they change the technology so as not to require sealant and bring things on par with tubeless tires in the automotive world.

  16. #16
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    I have a couple of sets of Escalators that are 8 or 9 years old. They have been off and on rims numerous times since long before I went tubeless. They still set up fine with a compressor.
    Latitude 61

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    Iíll add this to the list of reasons I wonít go tubeless until they change the technology so as not to require sealant and bring things on par with tubeless tires in the automotive world.
    So if you puncture your bike tire and get a flat, you want to be carrying around a spare wheel with a tire on it so you can change it? You gonna strap this spare wheel on your back or ??? That's the technology of tubeless in the automotive world being applied to a bike.

    With a tubeless tire set up on the bike the sealant more often than not seals the hole and you have to do nothing but keep riding. Worse case is you need to carry an pump and a spare tube.

    Your logic for not doing it makes zero sense considering the tubeless rims that are now available that don't require any taping. Bad analogy.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    My fatbike came with Mulefut rims and Maxxis tires. Both tubeless ready. when new i set it up tubeless with some difficulty (it was my first time), but worked relatively easily. I didn't need to inflate the tire with a tube first to seat one side of the bed.

    Then for several reasons I took the tires off and on. I had to redo my tape, used studded tires on last winter.

    Every time I put the Maxxis tires back on it needed some more convincing. I needed to use more soapy water, had to put a 26" tube around and needed more cursewords.

    This week I started to put them back on again and nothing worked. The tire seemed stretched. It slid really easily over the rim and no convincing would keep the bed sealed enough to inflate with the compressor.

    I ultimately had to take the tubeless valve out, install a fattube and keep the tire inflated with tube over night. then I removed the tube (left one side seated) and with tire levers i pulled that off-tire side close to the rim after putting the 26" tube around the tire. I then held the wheel level so that the unseated side of the tire was at the bottom. nothing short of that would work. Thank goodness this did the trick, which includes every single trick I could find.

    From now on I leave that tire on till it is worn out. It really seems the tires stretch over time making tubeless installation more and more difficult.

    For the future I install a new tire and leave it be. If I ever want to do a studded set again, I better get a 2nd wheelset to avoid all the tire mounting.

    I don't care if anyone wants to learn from my experience. But my advice is to not remove tubeless fat tires unless you have a really good reason.
    I don't follow the logic here. I would have thought a stretched tire bead would seat easier, not harder. Now maybe if it stretches too far it will no longer seal - that I could understand.

    I've only ever dismounted & remounted tubeless tires annually, on my 29er & my road bike. I replace tires after 2 or 3 years, so at most I've remounted twice. My fat bike is new this year, so there's been no remounting yet. Are the physics somehow different for fat tires?

    Only once had to dismount a tubeless tire due to a puncture, & that was a sidewall tear that ruined the tire, so there was no remounting.

    All of my replaced worn tires had several white spots where the Stans fluid did its job without my knowledge until the tire was removed. Other than the one sidewall tear, I've never had a puncture that didn't seal. This is another reason I will always run tubeless. The others are:
    - Rotational weight savings
    - Decreased rolling resistance
    - Use lower pressure to increase traction
    - No need to carry bulky heavy spare tubes.

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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
    So if you puncture your bike tire and get a flat, you want to be carrying around a spare wheel with a tire on it so you can change it? You gonna strap this spare wheel on your back or ??? That's the technology of tubeless in the automotive world being applied to a bike.

    With a tubeless tire set up on the bike the sealant more often than not seals the hole and you have to do nothing but keep riding. Worse case is you need to carry an pump and a spare tube.

    Your logic for not doing it makes zero sense considering the tubeless rims that are now available that don't require any taping. Bad analogy.
    I carry a plug kit and electric compressor in my truck all the time. If itís a long trip Iíll even bring along my portable air tank just so I donít have t solely rely on the spare. So... until I can easily plug a tubeless tire just like I can and have down on tubeless auto, ATV and street bike tires lol will consider any tire technology that relies on tape and sealant to work properly as a fricking joke.

    What fat bike wheels are available that do not rely on sealant and tape? Take your time, Iíll be waiting and eating popcorn.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    Iíll add this to the list of reasons I wonít go tubeless until they change the technology so as not to require sealant and bring things on par with tubeless tires in the automotive world.
    See my list of reasons I won't go back to tubes. Sealant is great & almost always works, often without your knowledge that it happened.

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    I wonít go tubeless until they change the technology so as not to require sealant and bring things on par with tubeless tires in the automotive world.
    I've tried those.

    They do not seal punctures.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    Iíll add this to the list of reasons I wonít go tubeless until they change the technology so as not to require sealant and bring things on par with tubeless tires in the automotive world.
    Don't bother waiting for this because it will never happen.

    You'll see new taping or rim strip ideas, casing changes, bead changes (possibly) lighter tires, rim changes, etc. But I will eat my hat if we ever see a main stream tubeless setup that doesn't require some type of sealant.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    Iíll add this to the list of reasons I wonít go tubeless until they change the technology so as not to require sealant and bring things on par with tubeless tires in the automotive world.
    I hope not. Automotive tires require special shop tools and mounting macjines to mount on the rim. Current bike tire tubeless is not perfect, but at least can be done at home.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    I hope not. Automotive tires require special shop tools and mounting macjines to mount on the rim. Current bike tire tubeless is not perfect, but at least can be done at home.
    I agree, thatís completely true but ATV tires have been tubeless since the early 80ís and only run 2-4psi and donít require any sealant. When you get a flat you plug it, reinflate and away you go. I see zero reason for bicycles to still rely on tape and sealant other than to likely hold onto some stupid ass tradition of one sort or another. Iíve seen spoked, adventure type motorcycle wheels that are tubeless and they donít need sealant or other nonsense as they mount the spokes to the outside flange of the wheel. No penetrations in the wheel, no leaks.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    Then for several reasons I took the tires off and on. I had to redo my tape, used studded tires on last winter.

    Every time I put the Maxxis tires back on it needed some more convincing. I needed to use more soapy water, had to put a 26" tube around and needed more cursewords.

    This week I started to put them back on again and nothing worked. The tire seemed stretched. It slid really easily over the rim and no convincing would keep the bed sealed enough to inflate with the compressor.
    So it was extremely hard to get on then suddenly too easy? That's not common. I'm afraid your sample size is too small. You're clearly new to setting up tubeless fatbike tires and are not consistently able to swap tires. Unless you have a defective tire, which is possible, I think you just aren't proficient with how it works or the best technique.

    I ultimately had to take the tubeless valve out, install a fattube and keep the tire inflated with tube over night. then I removed the tube (left one side seated) and with tire levers i pulled that off-tire side close to the rim after putting the 26" tube around the tire. I then held the wheel level so that the unseated side of the tire was at the bottom. nothing short of that would work. Thank goodness this did the trick, which includes every single trick I could find.

    I don't care if anyone wants to learn from my experience. But my advice is to not remove tubeless fat tires unless you have a really good reason.
    Using a tube to set one bead of a fat tire is sometimes necessary and not uncommon. You don't have to leave it over night, just have to inflate the tire enough to seat one side. This makes it much easier to setup the second side.

    Lastly, you can install and remove a tire an unlimited number of times over many years with no ill effect. If the tire is defective for some reason you can try to have it warrantied, but I suspect there's nothing wrong with the tire.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    I agree, thatís completely true but ATV tires have been tubeless since the early 80ís and only run 2-4psi and donít require any sealant. When you get a flat you plug it, reinflate and away you go. I see zero reason for bicycles to still rely on tape and sealant other than to likely hold onto some stupid ass tradition of one sort or another. Iíve seen spoked, adventure type motorcycle wheels that are tubeless and they donít need sealant or other nonsense as they mount the spokes to the outside flange of the wheel. No penetrations in the wheel, no leaks.
    Many people put sealant in ATV and car tires. Slime was used in that long before it made it's way to a bicycle. The ATV market has more sealants available than the bicycle market.

    If you like tubes, enjoy. I will enjoy the weight savings, improved suppleness and lack of pinch flats with my tubeless.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    I agree, thatís completely true but ATV tires have been tubeless since the early 80ís and only run 2-4psi and donít require any sealant. When you get a flat you plug it, reinflate and away you go. I see zero reason for bicycles to still rely on tape and sealant other than to likely hold onto some stupid ass tradition of one sort or another. Iíve seen spoked, adventure type motorcycle wheels that are tubeless and they donít need sealant or other nonsense as they mount the spokes to the outside flange of the wheel. No penetrations in the wheel, no leaks.
    You're just making things more complicated than they need to be. Modern bike tubeless technology is really good. Sure, there are problems here and there, but that's true of any technology. If you want those technologies from cars and ATVs on a bike, be prepared for VERY heavy wheels.

    When done correctly, the tape works extremely well and is super light. Sealant is used to seal punctures mostly, true tubeless tires hold air just fine without sealant. I ran my tubeless set with no sealant all last winter with no issue. It was only ridden on snow, so I wasn't worried about punctures, which is where sealant is useful. Also, there are plugs available for bike tires as well, and they work great with no need to remove and remount the tire.

    Since you're not using tubeless rims you have no experience with this stuff. With tubeless rims and tires you can run below 1psi without issues, try that with your tubes. The vast majority of people who switch to tubeless(myself included) will never go back to tubes.

  28. #28
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    Running a tire without sealing just means it's going to leak when you run over a thorn.
    A person saying they won't run a tubeless setup without sealant just doesn't understand the consequences. Plugging a pinhole isn't really optional, is it? Unless the person is prepared to increase the hole just to attempt a plug? I don't get it.
    The comparisons above have not been realistic.
    When I mountain bike I may run over blackberry branches. I may get a thorn puncture. When I drive over a blackberry in my vehicle, it won't puncture. When I driver over blackberry branches on my dirt bike. It won't puncture.
    I found the solution as I wrote this! Bicycle tire manufacturers need to make tires that are are equivalent to the durability of vehicle and ATV tires.
    No wait that won't work either. Tire would be too heave to ride and would resemble the ride quality of a rigid bike.
    I'm not suggestion a person must go tubeless. I've ridden goo filled tubes for years and had no problems. But to state that the currently technology isn't adequate is sort of silly.
    I add 2oz of sealant every few months. Maintenance complete. No hard, dried sealant in the tire to remove. No need to break down a tire until said tire is gashed, or worn out.



    Is the picture with the clump of hardened sealant recent? I am relatively new to the tubeless world, a little over 2.5 years, and have yet to see a solid like that. Nobody I've talked to has experienced hardening like that in a long time.


    The tire sidewall will soften with use. Can the OP confirm the tire is getting weak due to tire removal or is it plausible the tire is softening simply due to age and use?
    Isn't an old tire easier to remove than it is to install a new tire?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    I carry a plug kit and electric compressor in my truck all the time. If itís a long trip Iíll even bring along my portable air tank just so I donít have t solely rely on the spare. So... until I can easily plug a tubeless tire just like I can and have down on tubeless auto, ATV and street bike tires lol will consider any tire technology that relies on tape and sealant to work properly as a fricking joke.
    You can plug a tubeless bike tire...

    https://enduro-mtb.com/en/best-tubeless-repair-kit/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-lruemFmqQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGx6YBp27_U

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    What fat bike wheels are available that do not rely on sealant and tape? Take your time, Iíll be waiting and eating popcorn.

    H.E.D.

    https://www.hedcycling.com/off-road/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyVUv2OFucM

    Uses rubber spoke nipple washers, seals up the holes without tape, and still leaves access to them for repairs

    Specialized Stout XC80

    Current available on the 2018+ Fatboys. Not available for sale yet on the Specialized website. I have them on my Fatboy Carbon Comp. Piece of cake to set up tubeless and they have no tape. They kinda copied H.E.D.

    You don't have to use sealant in any of these but it would be dumb not to. Hope your popcorn tasted good.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    I agree, thatís completely true but ATV tires have been tubeless since the early 80ís and only run 2-4psi and donít require any sealant. When you get a flat you plug it, reinflate and away you go. I see zero reason for bicycles to still rely on tape and sealant other than to likely hold onto some stupid ass tradition of one sort or another. Iíve seen spoked, adventure type motorcycle wheels that are tubeless and they donít need sealant or other nonsense as they mount the spokes to the outside flange of the wheel. No penetrations in the wheel, no leaks.
    You forget that you are comparing motorized wheels to human powered wheels. Tire weight isn't a consideration on ATVs or motorcycles thus they are pretty darn puncture resistant much like automotive tires.

    Bike tires are made lighter so we aren't lugging around 60 lb fat bikes. Thus they'll puncture a bit easier so sealant is a must.

    I really can't believe how obtuse you are on this subject of tubeless tires in bikes.

  31. #31
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    I stand corrected and am glad to learn about the HED wheels. Thank you for the info and you guys made excellent points regarding the construction difference between the tires, plug kits being available and the benefits of sealant.

  32. #32
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    Tubeless has saved my butt more than once. Trips to the SW came back with multiple cactus spines and goatheads that sealed up without me ever knowing about it on the rides. Had a bad day 5 years ago and was on the final 7 mile descent, but feeling terrible in my stomach and I felt that if I stopped, I wouldn't be able to start again for a long time, it was all I could do to keep it together. Then I rain over a nail or something and it sprayed sealant, but thankfully sealed up pretty fast and I never had to stop. That one was miraculous (well, not really, just doing what it's supposed to) and saved my a$$. This isn't an area known for thorns or cactus either (Alaska). I punctured on a sharp rock in Arkansas last year halfway around the 40 mile loop and it wasn't the best seal, but I walked the bike for a while, then after a while and adding air it finally took and I was back on my way. That one was a big error on my part because I had been riding all year without an extra tube. For some reason I thought I had been, but I found out the hard way...except I was still able to ride my bike out because of sealant! Did something similar up above the city here in the rocky mountains in the fall, punctured on a rock, was able to insert a plug and was back on my way. Those types of punctures would usually require a boot if installing a tube. I still keep a tube for back-up (when I remember), but the tubeless is so damn reliable and flats so far between that I sometimes get complacent.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  33. #33
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    The Mavic UST standard was w/o tape and sealant. It never really took off, as the UST tires were heavy and slow rolling.
    Then Stan came along with his system that allowed ''any'' tire and rim combination to run tubeless. That took off in a big way.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    I stand corrected and am glad to learn about the HED wheels. Thank you for the info and you guys made excellent points regarding the construction difference between the tires, plug kits being available and the benefits of sealant.
    post edit - I misread your statement. my points are a bit sharp here - sorry - I see you were conciliatory now.

    You know they make plug kits for bike tubeliss that function exactly the same way as moto ones right? they work great. I've done it a bunch - 2 min and you are riding again and I have tires with several plugs that have held beyond the life of the tire.

    Tubeliss no-sealant was the original first step re: UST. Personally, I think tubeliss ready with varying amounts (zero to a lot) of sealant was the more versatile solution.

    The genesis of this thread is "guy who hasn't done a lot of tubeliss set-ups has routine issue, has conjecture on cause"... much of the rest of it is pile on with tons of misinformation.

    ^forgive my tub(e)liss - been more on the moto end of things lately re: nuetech

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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    Is the picture with the clump of hardened sealant recent? I am relatively new to the tubeless world, a little over 2.5 years, and have yet to see a solid like that. Nobody I've talked to has experienced hardening like that in a long time.
    My stanimal grew between early 2014 and mid 2017(?) in a 3.8 Nate on 65mm rim with whatever regular Stans was available at the time. Maybe 2000mi on that bike over that time. Heated basement kept. Tire is still going with over 3000mi but I have switched to Orange Seal.

    Also have one the size of a quarter from a 2.4 on i20 rim.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    My stanimal grew between early 2014 and mid 2017(?) in a 3.8 Nate on 65mm rim with whatever regular Stans was available at the time. Maybe 2000mi on that bike over that time. Heated basement kept. Tire is still going with over 3000mi but I have switched to Orange Seal.

    Also have one the size of a quarter from a 2.4 on i20 rim.
    Thanks for the update.
    You're the only person (of only a few I talk bikes with) that has had a solid formation form Stans in recent years.

    Interesting to hear that it is in fact still an occurrence.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Espen W View Post
    The Mavic UST standard was w/o tape and sealant. It never really took off, as the UST tires were heavy and slow rolling.
    Then Stan came along with his system that allowed ''any'' tire and rim combination to run tubeless. That took off in a big way.
    Yeah, my first tubeless experience was with Mavic CrossMax UST and Maxxis Ignitor tires, worked great without sealant but I added some for puncture protection due to riding in thorn infested areas. Is a shame that UST didn't took off, it really worked well and without a compressor or gimmicks.

    After Stan's improved the sealant and rim tape system tubeless really took off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    Iíll add this to the list of reasons I wonít go tubeless until they change the technology so as not to require sealant and bring things on par with tubeless tires in the automotive world.
    Fatty tubes weigh a lot. I'll take 1/2 cup of stans with flat protection for the win. YRMV.

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    Swap summer to winters and refresh the sealant on my fat bikes and never had issues. Had hodags on my farley 6 that i wore the tires out on and had to stomp the side wall after a couple years to pop the bead off.

    The tread and side walls were more cooked than the bead was showing any sign of stretch...


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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    I agree, thatís completely true but ATV tires have been tubeless since the early 80ís and only run 2-4psi and donít require any sealant. When you get a flat you plug it, reinflate and away you go. I see zero reason for bicycles to still rely on tape and sealant other than to likely hold onto some stupid ass tradition of one sort or another. Iíve seen spoked, adventure type motorcycle wheels that are tubeless and they donít need sealant or other nonsense as they mount the spokes to the outside flange of the wheel. No penetrations in the wheel, no leaks.
    Do you want 1600g-2000g tires? Because atvs and dirtbikes have thick heavy tires, Thick large beads. They compromised thickness and protection with a bit if sealant... would rather sealant on light tires than heavy ass tires that dont need sealant.



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    This makes me laugh. Nobody asked for anybody's opinion about why people should/shouldn't run tubeless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by letitsnow View Post
    This makes me laugh. Nobody asked for anybody's opinion about why people should/shouldn't run tubeless.
    Yeah, your right. This should have been an informative post with no responses required. LOL

    Hey, it made the do go by that much better though.

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    Another opinion from someone relatively new to fatbiking (a little over a year), but not new to mtn biking....

    I've been tubeless on my trail bike for almost 10 years. Wouldn't have it any other way.
    For my fat bike, at least for now, I'm sticking with tubes. In listening to many folks (both online and others that I know and trust) talk about fat tubeless being more cumbersome , combined with the fact that 3 of the main issues running tubeless addresses are not an issue on my fatty, it's just not worth it for me.

    The first being low pressure without pinchflats. As a clyde (240 lbs), I didn't expect to run really low pressure on my fatty. I figured I'd have to be about 10 psi minimum, turns out I can go 4 and 5 front and rear when needed. That's as low as I have needed, and have never had a pinch flat.
    The second, punctures. My main uses for fat is winter riding. Not many sharp objects in the snow.
    Third, lower weight. While I haven't done a side by side weight comparison, I am using 26 x 3.0 tubes in my 4.8's with no issues. I'm sure the weight difference between that tube and a sealant/strip combo is minuscule.

    That said, I've have unexpectedly really enjoyed my fatty in the summer, I ride it maybe 20% of the time, but it will never be my only bike. For this reason, I will likely run my stock tubes with a bit of Stans in them for summer just to address punctures. Yeah, it will be heavy, but I'm not racing. However, this reason alone is not enough for me run tubeless year round. It has been nice to not have to constantly add air to one of my bikes' tires for a change.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by KThaxton View Post
    Another opinion from someone relatively new to fatbiking (a little over a year), but not new to mtn biking....

    I've been tubeless on my trail bike for almost 10 years. Wouldn't have it any other way.
    For my fat bike, at least for now, I'm sticking with tubes. In listening to many folks (both online and others that I know and trust) talk about fat tubeless being more cumbersome , combined with the fact that 3 of the main issues running tubeless addresses are not an issue on my fatty, it's just not worth it for me.

    The first being low pressure without pinchflats. As a clyde (240 lbs), I didn't expect to run really low pressure on my fatty. I figured I'd have to be about 10 psi minimum, turns out I can go 4 and 5 front and rear when needed. That's as low as I have needed, and have never had a pinch flat.
    The second, punctures. My main uses for fat is winter riding. Not many sharp objects in the snow.
    Third, lower weight. While I haven't done a side by side weight comparison, I am using 26 x 3.0 tubes in my 4.8's with no issues. I'm sure the weight difference between that tube and a sealant/strip combo is minuscule.

    That said, I've have unexpectedly really enjoyed my fatty in the summer, I ride it maybe 20% of the time, but it will never be my only bike. For this reason, I will likely run my stock tubes with a bit of Stans in them for summer just to address punctures. Yeah, it will be heavy, but I'm not racing. However, this reason alone is not enough for me run tubeless year round. It has been nice to not have to constantly add air to one of my bikes' tires for a change.
    Speaking to your 2nd point, I was getting more punctures on my fat bike than my other mtbs. Thorns. I think that sometimes the snow must hold them upright so they penetrate the casing more easily than if they were lying on the bare dirt. On the plus side, it would take 2-3 days for a little thorn poke to cause the tire to go flat with a tube. With tubeless and sealant, it's a non-issue.

  45. #45
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    I never went tubeless with a fat bike until I bought a proper tubeless set of rims in 2004. Since then, I have experienced this past year one tire that appears to have stretched a bit that i swap for studded tires. The identical tire on the other rim is fine. I kept having issues keeping the suspect tire inflated, and cannot find any air leaks from any holes. I bought a new tire and it works fine, same brand, identical tire. On the suspect tire I got a year and a half of use out of it, but consider I have two other bikes I also ride and a second wheelset with bigger fat tires for this fat bike.

    Nothing new to me, back when i used tubes on an older fat bike I had, I did encounter one tire that seriously stretched on that particular rim. I gave it to someone else who had no trouble with it. Tire variation at times can make stretching an issue for certain rims, tubeless or not. Back in the day with those mentioned UST rims, the ones I had would not fit any tire from one tire brand - I took them back to the bikeshop and they exchanged them as the owner had the same issue. Use them on a different brand of wheel, no problems.

    My point of all of this is there is MFG variation in both tires and rims, and at times one may encounter a bad fit or issues with tire stretch. It's not a tubeless vs non-tubeless issue from my experience. Sometimes it can be an expensive issue to diagnose, and may require buying a new set of rims if you can't get the tires you want to work, or vice versa.

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    I still say that the tire sees far more activity while actually riding it than a few removals/installs does.

    I guess a good test would be of somebody purchased a new tire than installed/uninstalled about 8 times without riding it and coming to the conclusion that install #8 was a floppy noodle compared to the new tire.

    Instead though, I'd rather just see somebody go ride their bike and 8 months later confirm the tire is as stiff as it was on day 1. Chances are it won't happen.

    My old tires are easier to remove than the new one is to remove, and I never remove a tire until it's time to be replaced.

    I'm just having a hard time wrapping my brain around what is happening during a tire removal process that is weakening the tire.

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