The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite - Page 4- Mtbr.com
Page 4 of 16 FirstFirst 1234567814 ... LastLast
Results 601 to 800 of 3018
  1. #601
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTB29erCurt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    227
    My local Walmart said I can bring it back to the store. That has to wait till tomorrow, have to get to work right now. Also, you can see in the 2nd picture where the derailleur is all twisted. I don't know, I may give the a 2nd chance and let them replace it. The bikes looks great. Oh by the way. before I took the bike out of the box, I had to loosen the front hub cones. The wheel wouldn't even spin, had plenty of grease in the bearings. Go figure. LOL
    Curt

    20?? Cycle Genius Falcon
    2011 Trek MAMBA 29ER
    2014 Surly Disc Trucker
    2016 Surly Ogre (Blacktacular)

  2. #602
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    15
    I have very little experience riding on wide tires and so I am considering the idea of getting a dolomite. However, what I'd like to do is mount various width tires from 2 inches to 4 inches for comparison. Can anyone imagine a reason why mounting tires of various widths on this bike wouldn't work out on this mongoose dolomite frame? Thanks!

  3. #603
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTB29erCurt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    227
    That's it, I'm done with Walmart. I just had it out with customer service about this Dolo. They will not replace the bike when I bring it back. They will only give me store credit or refund my bank card, which my take up to 3 weeks. Why can't they just order another Dolo at the store for me. I'm sorry sir you can only do that your self online. What the He'll lady. I feel sorry for the person at customer service when I return this POS in the morning. Rant over.
    Curt

    20?? Cycle Genius Falcon
    2011 Trek MAMBA 29ER
    2014 Surly Disc Trucker
    2016 Surly Ogre (Blacktacular)

  4. #604
    mtbr member
    Reputation: _flatline_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    23
    Never pass up the opportunity to bank a little good karma.

  5. #605
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,133

    Re: The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite

    Guys, I ordered a cheap junky bike, and got a cheap junky bike. I'm so pissed right now!

  6. #606
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTB29erCurt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    227
    Quote Originally Posted by ultraspontane View Post
    Guys, I ordered a cheap junky bike, and got a cheap junky bike. I'm so pissed right now!
    Well buddy, some of us are on fixed incomes and have to still work to buy the toys that we want. I bet you buy all your toys with credit cards, don't you.
    Curt

    20?? Cycle Genius Falcon
    2011 Trek MAMBA 29ER
    2014 Surly Disc Trucker
    2016 Surly Ogre (Blacktacular)

  7. #607
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by ultraspontane View Post
    Guys, I ordered a cheap junky bike, and got a cheap junky bike. I'm so pissed right now!
    He's got shipping damage. And an overtight front hub, altogether too common with these.

  8. #608
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by bowlofsalad View Post
    ...I'd like to do is mount various width tires from 2 inches to 4 inches for comparison. ... why mounting tires of various widths on this bike wouldn't work out...?
    Because the rims are 100mm wide.
    I can get the 3.7" wide tires on that rim. I can't imagine narrower working.

  9. #609
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by MTB29erCurt View Post
    That's it, I'm done with Walmart. I just had it out with customer service about this Dolo. They will not replace the bike when I bring it back. They will only give me store credit or refund my bank card, which my take up to 3 weeks. Why can't they just order another Dolo at the store for me. I'm sorry sir you can only do that your self online. What the He'll lady. I feel sorry for the person at customer service when I return this POS in the morning. Rant over.
    You bought it online, but you're able to return it to the store, and you're surprised it will take time to process? Contact online customer service and see what they can do.

    Now, is that Store Credit or store credit by a Walmart Money Card or Walmart Gift Card, which you can use right away to order another one online... but you're taking your chances with shipping again. And the front wheel hub is likely to be too tight again.

  10. #610
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTB29erCurt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    227
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    He's got shipping damage. And an overtight front hub, altogether too common with these.
    I fail to understand why he typed that. I guess he thinks that a $2000 bike can't get shipping damage.

    Like they say. Some people appear bright until you hear them talk.
    Curt

    20?? Cycle Genius Falcon
    2011 Trek MAMBA 29ER
    2014 Surly Disc Trucker
    2016 Surly Ogre (Blacktacular)

  11. #611
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Because the rims are 100mm wide.
    I can get the 3.7" wide tires on that rim. I can't imagine narrower working.
    I was planning on building various width wheels for each width. Meaning I would use a specific pair of wheels (hubs, spokes rims for front and rear) for something like a 2" wide pair of wheels, then another pair of wheels for 2.5", 3" and so on.

    I imagine that so long as the hubs fit in the dropouts that I should have any problems using a 2" wide tire all the way up to the stock 4" tire on this dolomite. But maybe someone knows of some reason this would be a bad idea.

  12. #612
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by bowlofsalad View Post
    I was planning on building various width wheels for each width. Meaning I would use a specific pair of wheels (hubs, spokes rims for front and rear) for something like a 2" wide pair of wheels, then another pair of wheels for 2.5", 3" and so on.
    I imagine that so long as the hubs fit in the dropouts that I should have any problems using a 2" wide tire all the way up to the stock 4" tire on this dolomite. But maybe someone knows of some reason this would be a bad idea.
    Some people do run 29er wheels on their fat bike in the summer. Most keep the fat tires for the cushion, grip & protection from pinch flats - or for just how much fun they are to ride!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdfjhnSLKO8

    Look through the other threads for 29er wheel ifo.

    As to why do the various sizes: unless you really really really want to test for some reason, just go ride your bike!

    Down the line, build a set of wheels with 29er rims, be it for fun/testing or you'd like something that rolls easier in the summer.

  13. #613
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    ... & protection from pinch flats ...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdfjhnSLKO8...
    That should read as: reduction in the chance/incidents of pinch flats.

  14. #614
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTB29erCurt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    227
    YES! Took the Dolo back to my local Walmart and they had another one somebody brought back. Only has a small scratch on the chain stay, I'll live with that. The front wheel spins good, but the back wheel may need a little adjustment on the bearing cones. I even got $25 back on the deal. I'm a happy old fart now.
    Curt

    20?? Cycle Genius Falcon
    2011 Trek MAMBA 29ER
    2014 Surly Disc Trucker
    2016 Surly Ogre (Blacktacular)

  15. #615
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Some people do run 29er wheels on their fat bike in the summer. Most keep the fat tires for the cushion, grip & protection from pinch flats - or for just how much fun they are to ride!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdfjhnSLKO8

    Look through the other threads for 29er wheel ifo.

    As to why do the various sizes: unless you really really really want to test for some reason, just go ride your bike!

    Down the line, build a set of wheels with 29er rims, be it for fun/testing or you'd like something that rolls easier in the summer.
    I have no interest in 29" tires, my goal is to compare tires of various air volumes.
    Allow me to rephrase my question in a way that might be simpler and more direct.


    Is there any reason why a 26"x2.0" tire would not fit on this frame? I would use hubs that fit well between the drop outs, and a rim that would fit well with a 26'X2.0" tire. When I say, 'use hubs' I mean, during the wheel building process.

  16. #616
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by bowlofsalad View Post
    I have no interest in 29" tires, my goal is to compare tires of various air volumes. ... Is there any reason why a 26"x2.0" tire would not fit on this frame? ...
    I have no idea. Never considered it.
    The diameter of a fat bike tires is ~29" to ~30".
    You'd be comparing apples and oranges, not just air volume.
    With 26" tires, you'd be closer to the ground. As in, the bottom bracket and crank arm at the bottom will be closer to the ground.
    Disc brakes should be fine.
    Gearing will be different.

    Go look at appropriate threads in this forum.

    Some people have put foam noodles inside the fat tires to reduce air volume. Your results may vary.

  17. #617
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    291
    Thought Iíd share..

    Took the Dolomite out onto the beach. What a blast.

    I went easy and slow and had no issues. People freak out over the weight but I honestly had no issues. LBS services my hubs and installed my megarange for me so it rolled smooth. I only used the mega range when in soft sand. Otherwise I had it in 2nd or 3rd gear on the hard pack. It was nice riding around

    Iím going to have to get a bike rack tho. Putting the bike in the trunk of the car was a bit of a hassle. But I knew that going in..didnít want to spend $200 on a hitch for a single time use.







  18. #618
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    I have no idea. Never considered it.
    The diameter of a fat bike tires is ~29" to ~30".
    You'd be comparing apples and oranges, not just air volume.
    With 26" tires, you'd be closer to the ground. As in, the bottom bracket and crank arm at the bottom will be closer to the ground.
    Disc brakes should be fine.
    Gearing will be different.

    Go look at appropriate threads in this forum.

    Some people have put foam noodles inside the fat tires to reduce air volume. Your results may vary.

    Tires aren't measured by their outside diameter.

  19. #619
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by bowlofsalad View Post
    Tires aren't measured by their outside diameter.
    They're not fit to the rim by their outside diameter. They are measured by their outside diameter if you're trying to fit them into a fat bike frame. Welcome to the world of fatbikes.
    And if you're going smaller wheels on a fat bike frame, remember that you're riding on a frame that was designed with fat tire diameter/heights.

  20. #620
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    I considered a dolo, but after adding up the cost of all the upgrades I would do out of the box, the bikes direct Boris was looking better and better. The 2x9 was worth it alone.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  21. #621
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTB29erCurt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    227
    I just noticed this dent in the right crank arm of the Dolo I took back to Walmart yesterday. Oh, they did blame FedEx. First time FedEx damaged a bike for me. LOL
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-mongoose-012.jpg  

    Curt

    20?? Cycle Genius Falcon
    2011 Trek MAMBA 29ER
    2014 Surly Disc Trucker
    2016 Surly Ogre (Blacktacular)

  22. #622
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    I considered a dolo, but after adding up the cost of all the upgrades I would do out of the box...
    People really do need to add that up BEFORE they buy. Different people have different needs, and different budgets, you want to make sure that given your needs, wants & budget, you get the best value available to you.

    I'm really enjoying my Beast and Dolo, and doing the inexpensive upgrades I chose to do, but man I really want a Ti.

  23. #623
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTB29erCurt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    227
    I got my Dolo adjusted to my liking, but. I can't get the seat post up high enough for full leg stretch on the down stroke. Anybody went with a longer seat post on here. I'm 6'1" and need a longer seat post.
    Curt

    20?? Cycle Genius Falcon
    2011 Trek MAMBA 29ER
    2014 Surly Disc Trucker
    2016 Surly Ogre (Blacktacular)

  24. #624
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    I read a lot of people replacing it

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  25. #625
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    291
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    People really do need to add that up BEFORE they buy. Different people have different needs, and different budgets, you want to make sure that given your needs, wants & budget, you get the best value available to you.

    I'm really enjoying my Beast and Dolo, and doing the inexpensive upgrades I chose to do, but man I really want a Ti.
    I agree. I actually like riding my Beast more than the Dolo. End of the day.. I may one day pull the trigger on a ďbetterĒ fat tire bike. And by one day I mean if I ever get enough eh to move to Oregon or Washington (Cali is a bit too expensive and populated to my taste)

    Quote Originally Posted by MTB29erCurt View Post
    I got my Dolo adjusted to my liking, but. I can't get the seat post up high enough for full leg stretch on the down stroke. Anybody went with a longer seat post on here. I'm 6'1" and need a longer seat post.
    Geez.. Iím 6í4 and I canít get my seat post low enough!! (3Ē up because of the bike rack on the back).

  26. #626
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,133

    Re: The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite

    Quote Originally Posted by MTB29erCurt View Post
    Well buddy, some of us are on fixed incomes and have to still work to buy the toys that we want. I bet you buy all your toys with credit cards, don't you.
    Quote Originally Posted by MTB29erCurt View Post
    I fail to understand why he typed that. I guess he thinks that a $2000 bike can't get shipping damage.

    Like they say. Some people appear bright until you hear them talk.
    I don't posses a single credit card, but it wouldn't matter one bit if I did. I'm just smart enough to know that spending $300 on a disposable Walmart bike probably isn't the best use of my money. Maybe that's part of the reason I have the bikes that I do. Not sure why you're expecting stellar support service from Walmart.

    You get what you pay for, customer support included. So go ahead and speak on how "bright" people are while you blow your money on cheap department store crap, and then whine when it doesn't work out for you. Sounds like a plan.

  27. #627
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTB29erCurt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    227
    Quote Originally Posted by ultraspontane View Post
    I don't posses a single credit card, but it wouldn't matter one bit if I did. I'm just smart enough to know that spending $300 on a disposable Walmart bike probably isn't the best use of my money. Maybe that's part of the reason I have the bikes that I do. Not sure why you're expecting stellar support service from Walmart.

    You get what you pay for, customer support included. So go ahead and speak on how "bright" people are while you blow your money on cheap department store crap, and then whine when it doesn't work out for you. Sounds like a plan.
    To be honest with you, this is the first department store bike I ever bought. I'd much rather pay $250 for a Fat Bike to see if I liked the style of riding, then to spend 2K and regret buying it. My non-department store bikes are my Surly Disk Trucker, and my Trek 29er. Those I didn't buy on the cheap to try out first.
    Furthermore, people like you should never criticize what others buy.
    That's why I said, "some people appear bright until you hear them talk".
    Curt

    20?? Cycle Genius Falcon
    2011 Trek MAMBA 29ER
    2014 Surly Disc Trucker
    2016 Surly Ogre (Blacktacular)

  28. #628
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    291
    Quote Originally Posted by ultraspontane View Post
    I don't posses a single credit card, but it wouldn't matter one bit if I did. I'm just smart enough to know that spending $300 on a disposable Walmart bike probably isn't the best use of my money. Maybe that's part of the reason I have the bikes that I do. Not sure why you're expecting stellar support service from Walmart.

    You get what you pay for, customer support included. So go ahead and speak on how "bright" people are while you blow your money on cheap department store crap, and then whine when it doesn't work out for you. Sounds like a plan.
    I must be dumb as a stick. I bought a beast online and had to return it via mail through walmart. Well it was an exchange and they mailed me out a new one. I returned the old one and while they did admit they received it they still changed me and haven't refunded the money like they said.

    Flip side I did not whine about it. Just started my experience so others have a heads up should they feel they want to exchange

  29. #629
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    Wait so you paid for 2 beasts and have one?

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  30. #630
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    291
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    Wait so you paid for 2 beasts and have one?

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk
    Correct.

    Iím in no worries though.. my bank puts the money back in my account before I hang up with them. Iíve just been too lazy/busy to call them up and have them remove the charge.

    I will say though that walmarts return process via their website is horrible. The jacked up part is I couldnít return the first beast to a walmart near me. However the replacement unit they gave me I have the option to do so. Go figure..

  31. #631
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    34
    anyone have a rear dolo wheel they want to sell? or know where to buy it separately (don't see it on walmart's site if they do)? I started with a beast just before the dolomite came out and figured I'd try to get a new hub from cycle us, but if someone has a compleat rear wheel I'd like to try and purchase it. I'm thinking I wouldn't have to guess on how to dish it and whatnot. rim can be striped, drilled or stock, as long as it's straight and functional. don't need the tire and tube either unless it's a deal breaker.

    just send a pm if so. thanks.

  32. #632
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763

    Re: The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite

    Quote Originally Posted by ImaBum View Post
    Correct.

    Iím in no worries though.. my bank puts the money back in my account before I hang up with them. Iíve just been too lazy/busy to call them up and have them remove the charge.

    I will say though that walmarts return process via their website is horrible. The jacked up part is I couldnít return the first beast to a walmart near me. However the replacement unit they gave me I have the option to do so. Go figure..
    That's weird.. I bought 2 tablets on black Friday and brought them to customer service for refund because the descriptions were a lie. They didn't sell them in the store, but took them back. It took the woman a half hour to figure out how to add it to the store inventory first though, but she did it.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  33. #633
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by Philphine View Post
    I started with a beast... figured I'd try to get a new hub ... if someone has a complete rear wheel I'd like to try and purchase it. ...
    Compared to the Beast, the Dolo has wider hubs and BB spindle, for clearance for the chain getting to the stack of gears. If you're thinking of putting a Dolo rear wheel directly into your Beast, I'd suggest to do a through search of the internet to see if someone has already done that or similar, to see what's involved in making it fit, and then work. I assume you're after rear gears & disc brakes.

    You might be able to buy a Dolo rear wheel from Pacific Cycles. And the spindle.

    That said, with the Dolo hub & unknown spokes, you are likely better off buying an upgraded hub and spokes and rebuilding the wheel. Given the cost to buy & ship a wheel, an upgraded hub for your beast may be the same, more, or even less money.
    LBS usually don't gouge when building a wheel. Not all LBS are equal in doing a good wheel build. If you have a bike co-op near you, it can be a lot of fun to build a wheel.

  34. #634
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    34
    it's a freak bike for me. i'll make it work.

    if the bottom bracket is wider then i think i'll weld in a bb from one of the schwinn choppers. i've been wondering if i should anyway just to find easier replacement parts from what i've been reading in the beast thread.

    i figured i'd be better off if i could find a dolo rear wheel after doing some ebay searching. i didn't see a wheel, or even just a hub, that was less than buying a whole dolomite, so i'm hoping i can just grab a dolomite wheel for less. being a recreational build, high end parts won't really gain me anything.

    i just joined a co-op a month or so back though, and they know wheel building is about my main reason for being there (along with finding some occassional treasure), so given the chance and lucking upon the parts, i may try it.

  35. #635
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by Philphine View Post
    it's a freak bike for me. i'll make it work.

    if the bottom bracket is wider then i think i'll weld in a bb from one of the schwinn choppers.

    being a recreational build, high end parts won't really gain me anything.
    have fun

    Maybe no to welding in a new bb. Unnecessary. You can put the YSB cup&bearings in for a great BB (although you do have to adjust it correctly). What you need is a wide enough spindle/axle. Although going for a wider BB would give you more support against bending an extended spindle. You need to get over to FAT BIKES | Rat Rod Bikes, and their other forums on how-to and the like.

    You don't need high end parts. But once you get above dept. store quality hubs, they are an order of magnitude up, or more, for providing a smooth ride, strength and longevity. Are you doing this for a lark, or do you intend to enjoy the bike for some years.

  36. #636
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    34
    duly noted.

    i'm hoping to buy a dolomite rear wheel. if someone has one for sale or a sourse please let me know. thanks.

  37. #637
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTB29erCurt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    227
    To all you Mongoose Dolomite owners. There's a Facebook page where you'll get answers to your questions a lot faster than you will on here. Also you won't be harassed by other members for buying a Mongoose Dolomite.

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/613073762054967/
    Curt

    20?? Cycle Genius Falcon
    2011 Trek MAMBA 29ER
    2014 Surly Disc Trucker
    2016 Surly Ogre (Blacktacular)

  38. #638
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTB29erCurt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    227
    Well, since my Dolomite was a return after taking my new Dolomite back to my local Walmart, I decided to take it back too. Whom ever own the one I took back must of did an endo on it. The handlebars were bent downward on the right side by about 1/4 of an inch. The rear wheel would only spin about 4 or 5 times when I had the bike up side down working on it, I know maybe a tight bearing, but still. I just decided Fat Bikes just wasn't for me. I'm gonna stick with my Trek 29er and my Surly Disc Trucker. Good luck and God Speed to the rest of you with your Dolomite's.
    Curt

    20?? Cycle Genius Falcon
    2011 Trek MAMBA 29ER
    2014 Surly Disc Trucker
    2016 Surly Ogre (Blacktacular)

  39. #639
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    3
    double post

  40. #640
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    3
    ImaBum,

    Thanks for posting your pictures. I like the mods you've made to your Dolo. What kind of rack is that? Could you post a shopping link?

    Thank you in advance.

    Sir Real

  41. #641
    Custom User Title
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    154
    Quote Originally Posted by MTB29erCurt View Post
    Well, since my Dolomite was a return after taking my new Dolomite back to my local Walmart, I decided to take it back too. Whom ever own the one I took back must of did an endo on it. The handlebars were bent downward on the right side by about 1/4 of an inch. The rear wheel would only spin about 4 or 5 times when I had the bike up side down working on it, I know maybe a tight bearing, but still. I just decided Fat Bikes just wasn't for me. I'm gonna stick with my Trek 29er and my Surly Disc Trucker. Good luck and God Speed to the rest of you with your Dolomite's.
    Your jumping the gun if this is based wholly on a $225 Walmart bike.

    Just about everyone in this thread and the Mongoose facebook page says it needs a little love, grease and bearing adjustments..re-adjust the brakes and you can run it...upgrade it if you choose.

  42. #642
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    291
    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Real View Post
    ImaBum,

    Thanks for posting your pictures. I like the mods you've made to your Dolo. What kind of rack is that? Could you post a shopping link?

    Thank you in advance.

    Sir Real
    Thank you, Sir!

    The rack.. $14 at your local walmart

    Itís okay.. I like it a lot. Just wish the bolts that tighten around the seat post were black. Otherwise very solid!!

    Just make sure it comes with the bunjie cord!

  43. #643
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    3

    WallyWorld?!

    Quote Originally Posted by ImaBum View Post
    Thank you, Sir!

    The rack.. $14 at your local walmart

    Itís okay.. I like it a lot. Just wish the bolts that tighten around the seat post were black. Otherwise very solid!!

    Just make sure it comes with the bunjie cord!
    A trip to WallyWorld?!


    I'm so f'ing IN!

    Thanks.

  44. #644
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    10

    Lube all bearings tune bike

    Upgraded my dolomite gears, DER , chain , tires, inner tube, handle bars , pedals , stem, and seat.I had to re lube all bearings and tighten down bb a little after 24 miles plus adjustments , so far I have total in upgrades with bike is still under 450.00.total miles 300 plus and rides very nice.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-017.jpg  

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-027.jpg  

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-014.jpg  

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-026.jpg  


  45. #645
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7

    The Tank

    Showing off my project. I just got her back together.
    Upgrades include:
    MegaRange 14t freewheel
    Avid BB7 dual disc brakes
    YST sealed BB bearings
    Vee Rubber Speedster tires
    Lightweight tubes
    Shimano rapid fire shifter


    I stripped the paint from the frame and powdercoat from the wheels using paint remover. Sprayed both. Dropped 11 lbs in the process. She rides great.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-20140908_175300sm.jpg  

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-20140908_181220sm.jpg  

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-20140908_175538sm.jpg  


  46. #646
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    Lurked forever and finally bought one yesterday. Should come in next week and I plan on taking it apart, greasing, and properly assembling it next week. 6'5" so I'm getting a $10 shim to use one of my seatposts. Definately swapping to a 32T or smaller front crankset. Toss up if I want to get some sort of BMX bars or just live with the really aggressive handlebar stance. Time will tell and there's a decent size bike parts swap meet next weekend near me. Assemble & ride on Friday, swap a couple cheap parts on Saturday.

  47. #647
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    My friend is 6'4 and sat on one out of curiosity.. Ok, we rode it around the store trying to wheelie... Anyways, he barely fit on it. That's going to be one long seat post. At 5'6 most one size fits all bikes fit me and the dolo did fit.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  48. #648
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    stock components definately won't fit me. The measurements others have posted in the long ago time (page 2) give it a wheelbase about 3/4" shy of my 21" 29er. worst case, I ride it for a bit and sell it for $200. If I like, justifies getting a more expensive one with proper fit. If I don't like it, out less than hundred in comparison to the $500+ I'd be out with an expensive one.

  49. #649
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Seen this before. Lots.
    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    stock components definately won't fit me. ... worst case, I ride it for a bit and sell it for $200. If I like, justifies getting a more expensive one with proper fit. If I don't like it, out less than hundred in comparison to the $500+ I'd be out with an expensive one.
    Problem is, will your dislike be to:
    - not liking fat bikes, or
    - you're turned off of fat bikes because the bike didn't fit, or
    - you're turned off of fat bikes because this bike is below the quality that gives you the ride you like.

    One recommendation that turns up again and again, is to get a used "real" fat bike - one that FITS you - at a good savings over new. If you don't like it, you should be able to sell it and get most if not all of your money back. If you like it, ride it. But watch out: a surprisingly high number of fat bike riders find they like it so much they don't use their other bikes much, if at all. Some liquidate everything and put some serious money into a serious fat bike.

  50. #650
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    I'm in that category.. I'm selling another mtb to fund my bluto cause my gf would think I'm crazy for buying a 600 dollar fork.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  51. #651
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    One recommendation that turns up again and again, is to get a used "real" fat bike - one that FITS you - at a good savings over new.
    I probably would have, but after 3 months of searching, nothing went below the $1200 mark for used. Can't justify that. Probably because everybody who gets one is keeping it, and those that don't keep em are crazy nut jobs who can't figure out how much a bike is worth. Same people who think they can sell used used cyclocross tires for $120 ea, but they're brand new for $40.

    Thought about the bikesdirect ones, but I just like the rim width of the dolo better. If you're going to go fat, go real fat.

  52. #652
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fat_tires_are_fun's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    520
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Seen this before. Lots.

    Problem is, will your dislike be to:
    - not liking fat bikes, or
    - you're turned off of fat bikes because the bike didn't fit, or
    - you're turned off of fat bikes because this bike is below the quality that gives you the ride you like.

    One recommendation that turns up again and again, is to get a used "real" fat bike - one that FITS you - at a good savings over new. If you don't like it, you should be able to sell it and get most if not all of your money back. If you like it, ride it. But watch out: a surprisingly high number of fat bike riders find they like it so much they don't use their other bikes much, if at all. Some liquidate everything and put some serious money into a serious fat bike.
    I agree with this. Don't make the mistake of thinking the idea of fat biking is so splendid that it will be enjoyable on any bike. The Dolo is a great option for people whom it fits and want to go cheap.
    If it does not fit, it surely won't be fun for long and it is a waste.
    Also, I have seen plenty of used Pugs selling below a grand.
    Do yourself a favor and buy a bike that fits.
    - MOOTS Mooto X
    - Salsa Fargo
    - Niner RLT9

  53. #653
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    107
    I agree with you FAT_TIRES_ARE_FUN! I've seen so many folks that have bought 'cheap' bikes, put lots of money into them...and then decide that it isn't for them. My question is " how do you know?" Save your money and time, and look for a good quality bike that is used... that way at least you'll be able to make an informed decision on whether this is something that you'll enjoy.

  54. #654
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    I dunno.. 600 for the Boris x5 shipped.. Or 500 for the gravity one... Kinda hard to look at the dolo when it's 250 and needs another 100 in tires, 100 for brakes, 50 for stem and bars, 100 for a crank, 200 for shifter cassette hub and derailleur, and it only comes in one size. I was looking at the dolo cause I didn't mind putting the work into something but it just didn't justify the expense.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  55. #655
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    107
    Glad to hear that you are considering your options! One size bike is liking telling us that we all wear the same size shoes... no matter what we do, the bottom line is that they don't fit. You can't go wrong with good quality...and something that fits.

  56. #656
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FatBikeNoob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    98
    Get your exact measurements or size you like and then post a Fat Bike Wanted on this used Facebook Fat Bike Trader group:

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/fatbiketrader/

    Like this decent deal below:

    For Sale.
    Surly Pugsley, size LARGE. Excellent condition!
    XT, SRAM, Ritchey, Fatback, Truvative components.

    $1100. FREE shipping to anywhere in the lower 48 states.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=1&theater
    Current bikes: 2010 Raleigh Talus 29er with Ergon GP5 grips, Shimano PD-T420 Click'R pedals, Topeak Explorer 29" Disc MTX Rear Rack and Topeak DXP bag.

    2013 Walmart Mongoose Beast blue


    "Put The Fun Between Your Legs"
    "26" isn't Dead, it just got FAT"
    "I Dream On Two Wheels"
    "Be The Motor, You Are The Engine"

  57. #657
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    291
    Iím just curious..

    How does a Dolomite compare to a more expensive bike? I mean - how much of a noticeable difference is there?

    I donít know jack about bikes. Other than stuff moves and it moves me based on the effort I put in. When it comes to sizes, I didnít know that one could order ďdifferentĒ sizes.

    Outside of sizes, does it come to just easier servicing of parts??

    For example, hubs.

    Lets say you have brand new hubs from X company and from Y company.

    X is stupid cheap
    Y is stupid expensive >$500

    They have a round-a-bout that holds steel balls that rotate. You apply grease needed to operate and...... do both work the same? One easier than the other to grease? One last longer than the other because??

    I donít mean to be ignorant. Iím just curious as to how a simple product like a bike could have such higher costs to purchase - outside of general labor to make special frames out of say carbon fiber vs steel.

    I think my Dolomite is fantastic. But Iím curious to see how it would compare to a $1,000 bike (about $775 more than what I paid). Would I realllllllly get $775 better bike? Or easier to maintain bike? Or better parts? If so, what parts are better. I assume not the nuts - a nut is a nut. If it can handle 50# of pressure Iím not sure how a super nut could do much better.

  58. #658
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by ImaBum View Post
    ... how much of a noticeable difference is there? ... I donít know jack about bikes. ... I didnít know that one could order ďdifferentĒ sizes.

    One last longer than the other because??

    ... how a simple product like a bike could have such higher costs to purchase - outside of general labor to make special frames out of say carbon fiber vs steel.

    ... Iím curious to see how it would compare to a $1,000 bike

    ... I assume not the nuts - a nut is a nut. If it can handle 50# of pressure Iím not sure how a super nut could do much better.
    Your prior posts had already made your above comments & questions abundantly clear. And your current questions underline that. But it's good that you're starting to ask.

    There's a lot of information about bikes & their parts that you haven't got yet. Without that information, you'll continue to be in the dark and a lot of things won't make sense, including the comments from the experienced riders of "real" fat bikes that drop into this thread from time to time to try to offer us advice. There is way too much to cover to be able to cover it here. You're going to have to go do a lot of reading.

    I'm sure you'd understand the difference in quality and performance between a $ car a $$$ car and a $$$$$$$ car. Same with cameras. Same for violins. Well surprise, same for bikes.

    Better quality parts (and design!) get you longer lasting (wear, seals), reliability (it can get you there, and get you back), easier to use, more fun to use,

    Start looking at some of the places a quality bike can get you to - and get you back because it didn't break! http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/dai...46442-265.html Look at the details of the bikes they're riding (and that's not a how-to thread but a where-I-went thread - respect that (and you've posted your same photos enough around the forum that they don't need to see them again there).

    You can also look at some of the other forums here at MTBR for an idea on how much goes on with regard to the various components, frames, etc..

    For your info there are different types and grades of steel, etc.. The quality, and qualities, of the material, along with design, and much research & development (and that costs), and the machining combine to provide bearings and other components that will have different quality and qualities. Better, well, costs more.

    How much better? You have to go ride one. And it doesn't have to be a fat bike. Just a better quality bike to get an idea of what better parts are like to ride. And a correctly sized bike too.

    One thing you can start to do is OBSERVE what parts people are buying. Lurk there, go to the parts sellers' sites and read up on the different parts people are buying (materials, design, etc.). (It's not a newbie's getting started nor engineering thread, so don't annoy them with crap like that.)
    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/you...750452-91.html

    If you want to know more, go read at Sheldon Brown-Bicycle Technical Information and at Park Tools in their how-to section. In fact. Thinking about it, start at Sheldon Brown's site.

    It's not about the nuts. Although with some of the posts I see here, I'm not too sure some days.

  59. #659
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    What do you get when you pay more money? Well, better materials, designs, and tolerances. Take hubs for an example. A cheap hub uses cheap parts. Axles bend/break, bearing races deteriorate.. An expensive hub has sealed bearing. Not only easier to replace, but when the bearing and race go bad, you don't have to throw the hub out. Spokes.. Cheap spokes break, aren't consistently tensioned.. And this all has to do with quality and manufacturing tolerances.

    Derailleur.. Well, same thing. They work better, last longer, are made of better materials, have better designs such as shadow and clutch, and generally they work. A cheap derailleur will need constant tuning, and will not work well under pressure or hard use. And they are more prone to breaking. Even something as simple as a handlebar stem. A cheap one can expand, and even break. I've seen both happen. They are made of softer material and will need to be watched. Even the screws on cheap stems are softer metal and will break or strip.

    What that 775 dollars gets you is a design that had been researched not for a price point, but for quality. The mongoose is below entry-level in every way. From its brick tires to its starnut, everything on it was chosen to meet a specific profit margin. I thought about getting one but it would need way too much money invested to bring it to a point where I could ride a trail with it.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  60. #660
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    ... If you're going to go fat, go real fat.
    Really? For what terrain at what time of the year for what type of riding you do?

    Fat refers to the tire. Different tires, and different uses of a specific tire, require different rim widths. Do you want the tire to be round and dig in, or flat an float, or flatish to have more surface to surface contact for grip? (to simplify it) And it's a lot more complicated than that, and you have to take in account the tread/lugs and inflation. Go read in the other threads about how people are choosing such things. 100mm may not be the optimum rim width for your riding.

    I've got 100mm rims and 47mm rims. Most people are more sane and have one set in the middle somewhere.

  61. #661
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    What do you get when you pay more money? Well, better materials, designs, and tolerances. ... Not only easier to replace, but when the ___ go bad, you don't have to throw the ___ out. Spokes.. ... And this all has to do with quality and manufacturing tolerances.

    The mongoose is below entry-level in every way. From its brick tires to its starnut, everything on it was chosen to meet a specific profit margin....
    would need way too much money invested to bring it to a point where I could ride a trail with it.
    I think your phrase "below entry-level" sums up how the Dolo compares to what I call a "real" fat bike. A Dolo gets you a fat bike (fat tire), and while most Dolos work, they can't do the work that you can expect from an entry level fat bike - "where I could ride a trail with it".

    How far a Dolo, or an entry-level fat bike, would need to be upgraded (if at all - or if the part you need to upgrade can be upgraded...) depends on what someone wants the bike for, as in, riding style, bike paths vs. trails, time of year, etc..

    I would change your phrase to "everything on it was chosen to meet a specific" 'price point'.

    Some of us can't afford a "real"/entry-level fat bike, nor a used one, so a Dolo is pretty much the only choice.

    And make no mistake, I love riding my Dolo. But for those with a few more bucks, do make sure you do the math of how "much money invested to bring it to a point where I could" do what you want the bike to do. You could end up in the range of the entry-level fat bikes, where that kind of money has better value in an entry-level or an even higher quality used bike.

    And for those of us who like to see how much you can do for the least amount of money? Go for it.

    p.s.
    on the spokes, although this takes away from your message (which does need to be understood), my Dolo came with properly tensioned spokes that were properly set. Too soon to tell on the quality and longevity.

  62. #662
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    291
    Canoe & ou2mame,

    Thank you guys for the reads. From what I gathered -bikes are like vehicles. $$ cars vs $$$$$ cars vs $$$$$$$ cars. They are all made of metal & plastic. But the features & build quality, design time, engineering and yada yada all up to X price point.

    While Iím not against a $1,000 fat tire bike, itís just hard for me to justify the cost based on my specific use. But I can appreciate a ďbetterĒ bike. Iím just more so curious as to how the price can be so drastic for such a simple product.

    I do click the vendor links on this forum and check out their upgrade products and I must say Iím quite impressed with what one could buy for their bikes for ease of use.

    I hope one day I can be in better shape to actually get a bike worthy enough to take into the mountains and roam around in. And to be fair, I may get to that point one day (knee injury). Iím looking at vacation property in remote forests in my area to setup a small 500sqft cabin which would provide ample opportunity to ride a fat tire bike in summer/fall and with a dashing of snow on the ground (10k elevation) before winter hits!

  63. #663
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    It's hard to compare bikes to cars because everyone buys a car for the same purpose.. To commute. But we buy bikes to abuse. Imagine a bunch of companies that only sold jeeps. Upgraded to different levels and at different prices. They all look kind of the same, but they all are built for different uses. You've got lifts, tires, transmissions, locked rears... And then there's the dolo. It's a jeep shell, with daewoo parts inside. So you buy it because you can't afford the jeep with the jeep parts. All the daewoo parts are running the bike from the drivetrain to the tires. You're never going know what a jeep feels like of you only drive a daewoo. And if you bring it into the trails it'll kill you lol

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  64. #664
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    46
    As far as the Dolomite frame; has anyone had any problems with it breaking?

  65. #665
    mtbr member
    Reputation: HankSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    2

    Just finished my build...

    Just finished my build today. Thanks to everyone who has posted in this thread - I've gotten a lot of good information and ideas.

    I went with more of a beach cruiser build and added electric power to the front wheel.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-imag0379sm.jpg

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-imag0386sm.jpg

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-100_0847sm.jpg

  66. #666
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    That's a bad ass shifter! How is the powered front wheel in the sand? Can you go into deeper sand that you wouldn't be able to pedal in with it? I was thinking to power my front wheel for the snow I thought it would be cool to have 2wd

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  67. #667
    mtbr member
    Reputation: HankSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    2
    Thanks! It has been a fun project. It has not seen much time in the sand. I'm sure the electric power would help in the sand, but I don't know that it would hold up really well to the salt spray.


    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    That's a bad ass shifter! How is the powered front wheel in the sand? Can you go into deeper sand that you wouldn't be able to pedal in with it? I was thinking to power my front wheel for the snow I thought it would be cool to have 2wd

  68. #668
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    Has anybody put on an 8-speed freewheel? Clearance issues at the dropouts/chainstay?

  69. #669
    Custom User Title
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    154
    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Has anybody put on an 8-speed freewheel? Clearance issues at the dropouts/chainstay?
    It's been talked about a bit on the Facebook page and it sounds like its a pretty tight fit.

  70. #670
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    355
    I just bought a Dolomite for the following reasons:
    I wanted a fat bike, and had ideas about what I wanted. But as much as I wanted to pull the trigger on a Sturgis Bullit with Bluto, I had some hesitation. Partly not sure I wanted to spend that much on a fork on a cheap bike. Partly because I wasn't sure whether this would be a fat bike that replaces other MTBs, or if this would be a niche bike. So basically I spent $250 + upgrades to get a season or so of experience to decide whether to budget $600, $1200, or $2400, on a fat bike, or decide that this was enough. I have enough tech background to separate the variables, between q-factor, tire squish, tread style, component quality, etc.

    At 5'11", I needed to replace the seatpost immediately, as the stock one isn't long enough. The cockpit seems long even though it measures shorter than my XC hardtail. I put a megarange freewheel on it at the same time.

    My biggest problem with it is the q-factor. It seems to me that this Q is larger than just about anything else. Am I correct? It seems that the Dolomite has a Q around 245mm, while most 26x4.5 are around 215, 26x4 around 200, and standard 3x MTB around 175. I find it harder to put power into the pedals, and I find myself sore in new ways after riding the Dolomite. And then there's pedal strikes too. But this has been a very helpful data point. Now that I've compared 150mm G on a road bike, 180 on heavy touring, and 245 on fat goose, I have a much better idea of what's ideal for me.

    I'm also finding that on MTB trails, the >100mm rim and tire combo, while not being the worst, is still a little much. There are narrow or angled surfaces where I kept wishing for a narrower rim and tire. I'm sure I would love a 26x5 on snow, but given that my 29x2.4" was only so bad, I'm thinking a 26x4 on 70-80mm rims, or even the upcoming 27.5x3.25, each with minimum q-factor, will really be ok.

    Honestly, I could live with the tires, given their benefits, but the Q is just too much. Those two go very badly together, and the gearing range is the icing on the cake of those shortcomings. The long chainstays are another wet blanket, robbing me of traction when I need it.

    Armed with this info, I now know that my ideal fat bike is probably an On-One, and probably not a QBP, and may or may not be a BD. And the difference in price is far more than the Fat-Goose. Which still has its strong points.

  71. #671
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    591
    put an 1/8 washer between the axle nut and the drop out. or if i had known i would have put it under the axle nut while changing freewheels and greasing the bearings.

  72. #672
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    Quote Originally Posted by kidd View Post
    put an 1/8 washer between the axle nut and the drop out. or if i had known i would have put it under the axle nut while changing freewheels and greasing the bearings.
    I thought about this, just didn't know how much free space the rear dropouts allowed against the hubs and how much cross travel the rear derailure had (although that would probably get swapped out too). With a steel frame, they should have plenty of "wiggle room" to play with. Once I get the cockpit set up and a feel for the stock bike's handling, probably have to do some experimentation.

  73. #673
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    144
    I've read that the Dolo uses a 189mm width spindle in the BB. Is it symmetrically located or offset? ..and by how much? Pictures would be great! I am putting together a super trick run of upgraded BB's and would like to offer them for the Dolo as well.

    Thanks for the info in advance!!

  74. #674
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by chopsmitty View Post
    I've read that the Dolo uses a 189mm width spindle in the BB. Is it symmetrically located or offset? ..and by how much? Pictures would be great! I am putting together a super trick run of upgraded BB's and would like to offer them for the Dolo as well.
    Thanks for the info in advance!!
    I doubt anyone happens to have one apart.
    Is on the bike good enough? I can pull the arms easy enough (friend has the puller) and measure with a caliper.
    If necessary, I could pull my spindle out and place a steel rule beside it on axis. If I shoot from far enough back, you should be able to read what you want off the rule. But if you can show me what points you want measured, I have calipers. Should be able to get to it this weekend.

  75. #675
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    Mine should show up tonight and I could probably get the measurements you need tomorrow (it's part greasing/swapping time). I've been looking around, and it appears VP's 100mm square taper bottom bracket is slowly trickling out. I found it on their website under the origin8 bottom brackets, and a reference to the importer. Checked the J&B importer's website, and they don't have any in the states, but at least it's in the system.

    I'm pretty sure the 187mm is from the furtherest ends of the bolts that the dolomite's crankset axle uses instead of the shorter length measurement that most square taper bottom brackets use with a bolt hole drilled into the axle instead of a bolt protruding from the axle. I think this is the reason that VP's square taper bottom bracket is listed much shorter at 100mm x 137mm, which may actually limit the aftermarket cranksets that'll work with this. I'll take all measurements I can think of though.

  76. #676
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    144
    No need to pull the spindle, just need fairly accurate measurements from the end of the spindle (not the threaded stud, but where the sq. taper starts) to the B.B. shell edge. Something within 1 or 2mm would be great! Also maybe the dimension at the smallest part of the sq. taper - across the flats and also just confirm the width of the B.B. shell. With this info I'll have all I need. The two offsets along with the shell width will give me the overall length of the spindle (minus the threaded portions which I don't care about).

    Thanks guys!!

  77. #677
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    591
    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/xx1...le-922785.html
    Anyone think the 190mm spindle and sram bb30 arms will work on the dolomite.

  78. #678
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    291
    I want to get new tires for my beast. More of a street tire. And on the Dolomite I want to get more of a nicer tread pattern for trails/rain. I also need fenders.. rain season is coming here in Cali...

  79. #679
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    FedEx has failed me. Showed up last night in Kansas city, final destination, Kansas city. Today, it's in Oklahoma city. Wtf

  80. #680
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    I don't want to discourage you, but here's something that shipped July 12, 2011, delivered quite a while later. Caught in a loop between OH and CO. Wrong address going out the door mixed my address with another customer's in Denver. It was undeliverable and sent back the correct address in upper state NY changed in their computer, supposedly. Only when it got to OH, it read the original sticker and sent to back to CO. CO could read their correcting sticker and would send it back to OH. Eventually the vendor sent me another one, and we waited until it finally was delivered in NY, the box was decrepit (likely how it was discovered and intercepted), and it was shipped back to the vendor. It traveled over 20,000 miles?
    I have a screen shot somewhere showing it actually delivered in NY, but can't find it.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-hub-left-colorado-aug-23-2011-edited.jpg

  81. #681
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    I've had packages get misrouted but that's simply amazing.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  82. #682
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    Quote Originally Posted by chopsmitty View Post
    I've read that the Dolo uses a 189mm width spindle in the BB. Is it symmetrically located or offset? ..and by how much? Pictures would be great! I am putting together a super trick run of upgraded BB's and would like to offer them for the Dolo as well.

    Thanks for the info in advance!!
    took my apart when it came in. Actually had grease on the wheel and headset bearings, but that bottom bracket was dry, severely overtorqued, and had metal shavings in it. Not the best picture, but It should suffice. I was surprised that the actual length was about 187mm from tapered end to tapered end. After seeing this, i don't know if the VP 100mm bottom bracket would work.


  83. #683
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    591
    Did you get the narrower chainstay frame?

  84. #684
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    I got the one Walmart sent. Are there different dolomite versions?

  85. #685
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    591
    That's why the guy on facebook was able to put the race face turbine crank on his. Some are 3/4 inch narrower.

  86. #686
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    144
    Come on guys... See post #678. First guy to message me the info I need will get paid a new bottom bracket assy. that he helped develop!!!

  87. #687
    29ers Forever
    Reputation: CannondaleF9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    3,388
    Quote Originally Posted by chopsmitty View Post
    Come on guys... See post #678. First guy to message me the info I need will get paid a new bottom bracket assy. that he helped develop!!!
    I'm not sure what you are trying to say here.
    Dropping into a trail

    2019 Rocky Mountain Instinct A50 BC
    2019 Salsa Timberjack SLX
    2014 Trek Crossrip Elite

  88. #688
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    Pretty much everything is available from the picture I posted. Can't get the width of the square taper, but that should be the same as that used on any other square taper. On a side note, you might want to consider a slightly narrower one (maybe 175mm) because of the different chainline of standard mountain bike crankset vs. the one that comes on the dolo.

    Based on the picture, spindle length = 188mm
    no offset
    length of tapered section 19mm
    well established BB width = 100mm
    width of bottom bracket retaining caps ~2mm on each side
    width from bottom bracket to edge of square taper = (188-100-2-2)/2 = 42mm

  89. #689
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    144
    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Pretty much everything is available from the picture I posted. Can't get the width of the square taper, but that should be the same as that used on any other square taper. On a side note, you might want to consider a slightly narrower one (maybe 175mm) because of the different chainline of standard mountain bike crankset vs. the one that comes on the dolo.

    Based on the picture, spindle length = 188mm
    no offset
    length of tapered section 19mm
    well established BB width = 100mm
    width of bottom bracket retaining caps ~2mm on each side
    width from bottom bracket to edge of square taper = (188-100-2-2)/2 = 42mm
    Ok! Sounds good. Based on the picture, I would have no idea what the overall of the spindle length is (the angle makes it very difficult to see - and I'm trying to build something very precise)... Just looking for the offset and a confirmation on the BB shell width.

    You got it, if you want it. I'll send out the first production piece to you. Just message me your address.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-10547828_10202747582993769_7322684758197588314_o_zps9edc3e22.jpg

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-10658696_10202747583873791_3020100887805497316_o_zps8de00dc5.jpg

  90. #690
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    if a free bottom bracket is on the line, I'll get you more data than you'll know what to do with. Plus, I'm swapping cranks tonight. That 36 tooth is just too much.

  91. #691
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marna_Kazmaier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat85 View Post
    canoe, thanks for posting all these pics!
    And your detailed review!
    I am still not sure what Fatty I will buy, but it is fun to see and read all the options.

  92. #692
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7
    I run the Vee rubber Speedsters. They work well on street/hard packed trails.

  93. #693
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by ImaBum View Post
    I want to get new tires for my beast. More of a street tire. And on the Dolomite I want to get more of a nicer tread pattern for trails/rain. I also need fenders.. rain season is coming here in Cali...
    I run the Vee rubber Speedsters. They work well on street/hard packed trails.

  94. #694
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    144
    If anybody is interested in a sealed bottom bracket, see this:
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/613073762054967/

  95. #695
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    took more measurements for you, but they're at home on a piece of paper. I put some Shimano cranks (Alivio) on them, and the 64BCD chainring lines up exactly with the dolomites chainline. I put a $7 controltech 29T ring on it, and I'm liking it a lot. If a person was to use the 110BCD chainrings (like the 30T raceface narrow-wide chainring) you'd really want the crankset moved in 7.5mm in, and the axle spindle length to be 15mm shorter, so 174mm. Also, the chainstay clearance on my bike with the schimano cranks was 15mm. If you did go with a 174mm axle, you'd still get 7-8mm chainstay clearance on each side. Not much, but enough.

    chopsmitty, are you able to set up your bottom bracket drilled and tapered instead of with the external bolts, or at least make the external bolts a litle bit longer? Also, see if you can use a standard thread count. Mongoose use a low quality metal 3/8" x 26TPI bolt/nut. It's a standard bike bolt normaly found on cheap kids bikes. I think we can do better.

  96. #696
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    144
    So, the Beast spindle is what you'd want. For those who want EXACTLY the same as the stocker Dolo, I'll offer that too.

    The spindle will have a tapped hole - 8mm. Pretty sure I have it all covered...

  97. #697
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    475
    I was in Scheels and they had Dolo with bigger, offroad tires on it ans said they get them in that way? Anybody seen this version?

  98. #698
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267

    Winter is coming

    So fellas, its about to get cold here in Vermont and I wanna order a dolomite to mod this fall before the snow arrives. I have a 26'' for XC/single track. However for the mongoose, can anyone comment on how it holds up in the snow and what tires would be best, i wont really be using this thing on the street or sand and after 4+ hours of reading this thread and the one on BBB I dont have a definitive tire recommendation.

    What I have found is that for
    $250 you get the bike
    $10 you pick up great cup seals
    $15 for megarange
    $15 shimano click shifter
    $100 tires/tubes

    Can achieve a really cool looking custom bike that can take mild trails and hopefully some snow.


    So do people like the on-one tires best, or maybe the vee's for the mud/snow? Any help is much appreciated

  99. #699
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blown240's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,037
    The dolomite just came out this spring, so few if any have ridden it in the snow. That being said, my buddy did some snow riding on his beast last winter and it was pretty good. Even with stock tires.

    His beast has been upgraded to basically what a dolomite is.

  100. #700
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    If you're buying the bike to immediately dump money into, you're better off going with a bikes direct bike cause it's gonna be the same amount of money and better.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  101. #701
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blown240's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,037
    I agree 100%!

  102. #702
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    291
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    If you're buying the bike to immediately dump money into, you're better off going with a bikes direct bike cause it's gonna be the same amount of money and better.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk
    either thats the dumbest thought process Iíve heard about buying a bike..

    or how we purchase a vehicle is completely wrong.


    Maybe people buy the dolomite so they can upgrade to parts they want..??
    I highly doubt a bike from direct will be perfect and not require upgrades.So maybe only that situation would apply to folk who just want a more expensive bike that just fits their needs.

    Just throwing that out there

  103. #703
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    My thing with throwing money into the dolo is that it only comes in one size, so I hope it fits perfect, and it needs just about everything but the frame replaced. I always do bars and stem when I buy a bike so I won't count that. But drivetrain is junk, wheels are too, plus the bb, crank, etc.. The dumbest thought process is thinking that you can upgrade the dolo cheaper than buying a decent bike in the long run. At that point, if you really want to spend the money, why not just buy a steel frame?

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  104. #704
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blown240's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,037
    the list of upgrades that he is talking about are all things than the bikesdirect bike alread have. I'm all about the dolo, I thinks it's a great bike. But if you already are planning on spending $4-500 right away, the BD is a better way to spend the money. My opinion as a person who bought 2 beasts and changed every part on them.

  105. #705
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    I'm not shitting on anyone for buying a walmart bike.. I almost did the same thing. But when I wrote it all down on a piece of paper the purchase didn't make any sense because at best I'd end up with a frankengoose and at worst would literally be stripping it to the frame eventually. The 7 speed needs to go, because that mega is always annoying to ride with and you'll tire of it soon. You'll want a proper 9 speed for the 34t in the back. The front chainring needs a new crank to replace right? And obviously you want a n/w 32t or maybe even a 30 if you're climbing and planning on the snow.. Then there's the shifter, at least something halfway decent like an alivio or x5 setup depending on how you do it. All of a sudden you have something comparable to the lurch at the same amount of money with worse components. If steel isnt a deal breaker I'd get the 500 dollar gravity monster one they have. At least out of the box it's a solid setup and you can upgrade as you break instead of upgrading everything all at once.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  106. #706
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    I just bougt a dolo, and I have to agree with blown240's statement. I had some parts in a junk box that I've already swapped over. If I got new tires and paid wholesale price for the parts I've swapped, the cost of my bike would be higher than the BD Gravity Monster, and it still wouldn't have the right size frame, the wheelset would be the same cheap steel freewheel hub, and it'll still be an easily rusted frame for use in the winter.

    The main reason I got the dolo over the BD version was the 100mm rims. I figure in a couple years the cost of fat tires will go down a lot, and I'll get new tires then. Once set up, the stock gear shifter and brakes worked ok. I was getting clean shifts on the trails and I could lock up the back wheel. The only things I really had to change were the handlebars (aluminum handlebars are so much better than steel) and the crankset (36T is way too high for hills & trails, although they were fine for asphalt/road). I've been running low tire pressure so far, but I'll take it up to ~13-15psi and go for levee trail ride today to see how it goes. Stinking rain messing up the dirt trails.
    Last edited by watts888; 10-03-2014 at 11:09 AM.

  107. #707
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    Hearing that the stock tires are good in the snow, and knowing that I would be doing the cockpit over on either bike I still think the dolo would make more sense.

    If you can basically seal in the bb for $10, and people (after adjustment) dont mind the stock brakes, and some extra front/rear gears that might be lying around in my garage. It seems like the bike could be put together on the cheap, and after all you would have into it, that would be less than the price point of the stock gravity. There is no way I would leave the gravity untouched, I think I would still put another $100 at least into the gravity.

    I thought that one of the best things the dolo had going for it was the rims were aluminum and light(unlike the rest of the bike).


    Either way I have to figure on buying either bike plus parts (X2) one for me and one for the gf, just to see if we would like going out in the cold. We both have 26'' mountain bikes and she really only likes to stay on the flat trails, not really up for single track, would she benefit from the gravity?

  108. #708
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    rims are aluminum, hubs are steel. Took a magnet to my dolo the other day. the aluminum parts were: stem, crankarms (oddly enough), and rims. Everything else was steel or plastic.

  109. #709
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    313
    Just a heads up that winter biking is hard work. Flat trails in winter can be physically and technically harder than hilly singletrack in summer. If your gf doesn't like hilly singletrack in summer, she probably will like winter riding less.

    Sent from my SPH-L720 using Tapatalk

  110. #710
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    Quote Originally Posted by RYNOFREERIDE View Post
    Just a heads up that winter biking is hard work. Flat trails in winter can be physically and technically harder than hilly singletrack in summer. If your gf doesn't like hilly singletrack in summer, she probably will like winter riding less.

    Sent from my SPH-L720 using Tapatalk

    Haha! That is what I'm fearing. I've never heard her swear so much unless she is riding uphill on her specialized. The quarries at Millstone have quite the elevation change and she is not a big fan of them. I was thinking we could start in some fields to get her into it.

  111. #711
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    291
    Quote Originally Posted by blown240 View Post
    the list of upgrades that he is talking about are all things than the bikesdirect bike alread have. I'm all about the dolo, I thinks it's a great bike. But if you already are planning on spending $4-500 right away, the BD is a better way to spend the money. My opinion as a person who bought 2 beasts and changed every part on them.
    This is true. I personally donít mind projects and ďbuilding upĒ something from the low end. Gives me something to do thatís drawn out and thought through vs just handed to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    My thing with throwing money into the dolo is that it only comes in one size, so I hope it fits perfect, and it needs just about everything but the frame replaced. I always do bars and stem when I buy a bike so I won't count that. But drivetrain is junk, wheels are too, plus the bb, crank, etc.. The dumbest thought process is thinking that you can upgrade the dolo cheaper than buying a decent bike in the long run. At that point, if you really want to spend the money, why not just buy a steel frame?

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk
    I agree completely. So it pretty much boils down to what the end user really needs/wants.

    In car terms - itís like buying a base model car with a manual only to upgrade it to an auto and install a keyless entry system. Just spend the extra $2k right there and not go through the hassle of doing it yourself while still having a crappy platform to begin with.

  112. #712
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by momikey View Post
    Hearing that the stock tires are good in the snow, ...
    I thought that one of the best things the dolo had going for it was the rims were aluminum and light(unlike the rest of the bike).
    My first rides on the Dolo were in the snow.
    I would not describe the tires as "good in the snow". I would describe them as: they work in the snow.

    For 100mm rims, they're not bad. As for their being light, big deal, the tires & tubes are grossly overweight (upgrade the tires & tubes to 3.7/3.8" 120 tpi and typically knock 3.8 lbs. off of each wheel). But they work.

    The weight of the stock tires & tubes will limit your acceleration. Much more important, the thick unsupple nature of the stock tires and tubes rob energy from your pedalling input; this is worse in the snow. 120 tpi tires are both lighter and much much more supple, and a huge improvement in riding enjoyment.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/que...l#post11293280

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/wei...l#post11406460

    A huge upgrade for a Dolo is to go for better tires. The better you can afford, the more you'll enjoy. If you're going trails, huge difference. If all you're be doing is crusing around town, and you don't care about the workout or going slower from having your energy robbed by the tires, no problem. If you haven't got the funds. Well, at least the stock tires work, so you at least get to play.

    It's not a matter of which tire is good for a Dolo in snow, but which tires are good for the type of snow you'll be in, and on what kinds of terrain. Go to the main fat bike threads for a wide range of information of available tires.

  113. #713
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    FYI, swapped over a 135mm axle (10mm diameter), cones, and lock nuts from a junk rear wheel to my dolo front wheel. So far, works great. Going for a trail ride tomorrow to see how it goes. Everything swapped over pretty much identical. Just make sure you get the thin lock nut on the right side. On mine, the thin lock nut was on the brake side. Dust shield were the same on my old and new cones, but the dust shield come off with a socket set on top and a light tap with a hammer. Swap em to the new cones.
    Last edited by watts888; 10-06-2014 at 05:43 AM.

  114. #714
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    10
    I upgraded my Dolomite tires with ON ONE floaters and the ride and control on black top and gravel were 50 percent better so far over 350.00 in upgrades. My wife now wants a fat bike and I told here I give her mine and she loved that idea so did I .I have ordered the BD Motobecane 2015 Sturgis Bullet. I cant find any fat bike with these kind of prices with such quality parts.If I keep up with the upgrades on the DOLO ill hit the price of the STRUGIS bullet easy.

  115. #715
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by HydroManEd View Post
    ...If I keep up with the upgrades on the DOLO ill hit the price of the STRUGIS bullet easy.
    Which is why we keep trying to tell people to do the math on their expected upgrades first. If you haven't got the bucks, the Dolo and a few key parts will do a lot. And I love my Beast and my Dolo, but if you're going to upgrade it into the low end of a "real" fat bike, you're better off spending that money on something that when stock is already in the low end of a "real " fat bike.

  116. #716
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    77
    Ok...I am looking at the Dolo and the BD ones. My main question is this...

    For 250 with a solid Walmart return policy..why not get this? I bought a Diamondback Recoil FS bike from Sports Authority for 350 after savings, and have beat the crap out of the bike, had so much fun, and still is going strong after 3 years. Just as good as my friends $3000 Specialized FS bike. At the time, I debated some crazy FS bikes and honestly, would have shot myself if I did not get the "cheapo" Diamondback.

    So for 250, considering that I am not in any sort of competition, time trials, etc...will this serve the purpose of having fun? Do I really need to change all the components like everyone says?? I mean, I have not changed ONE thing on the Diamondback and have never needed to. Again, it is solid.

    My only concern is the weight. Will it be completely unrideable uphill? I felt the weight of the Beast at Walmart, and it was pretty heavy. My DBack bike is heavy Im sure compared to a 3000 FS bike, but definitely rideable and a whole lot of fun like I said.

    Should I pull the trigger? Thoughts?

  117. #717
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blown240's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,037
    Do it, Pull the trigger! Worst case you return it.

  118. #718
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    First off, if you want it to last, you're going to have to do a clean & lube, preferably before you ever ride it. It comes with wheels that are suited for cruising, and it comes geared for cruising, and the components are of a quality for, you guessed it, cruising. So for using it as a Fat Bike would normally be used (but NOT as robust, so be careful where you take it), you need to get the gearing into the Fat Bike range. The quickest and cheapest way is the 34T megarange rear freewheel. Then there's custom freewheel stacks so you have more useful choices. Then a double or tripple front, etc., manually switched for the terrain you're in, or add the front derailer. This can be done cheap, or you can quickly get into a whole lotta bucks. This has all been covered before, many times in this thread.

    Then there's the tires. Also for cuising, but you can get away with using them on a variety of terrain. But there are much better choices, particularly when you get into 120 tpi tires. Also much easier to pedal 120 tpi tires.

    Figure out the cost of the changes/upgrades you'll need to get a Dolo to do what you want it to do. Then compare to what you can get off-the-shelf, to make sure an upgraded Dolo is good value for what you want to do.
    Last edited by Canoe; 10-08-2014 at 05:21 PM.

  119. #719
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    If you think that a diamondback is just as good as a 3k specialized, you've got some learning to do.. The 250 dollar dolo could very well be that lesson.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  120. #720
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    If you think that a diamondback is just as good as a 3k specialized, you've got some learning to do.. The 250 dollar dolo could very well be that lesson.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk
    well proof is in real life experience. And my DB goes on the same rough and rocky trails as my friends 3k bike. My bike stays pace and hits the same jumps. We are both 6 feet and weigh roughly the same. I'veridden his aand it is a little lighter so on paved trails may get a little more ahead, but honestly, for over 10 times more $, absolutely without a doubt in the world, no where near 10 times as better.

    Again..3+ years riding the DB hard and shows no sign of age whatsoever. If the Dolomite is anywhere near this experience, it seems like a no brainer.

  121. #721
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    Sounds like you made your decision then.

  122. #722
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    77
    Unless riding in the snow actually requires a very specific (albeit) more expensive fat bike, then I can understand paying more. Because in the mountain bike world, in my vast experience with many real world bikes, you can go cheaper and still have a blast on a variety of terrain.
    Is the stock Dolomite incapable of being ridden on trails in the snow? I saw a few YouTube videos of people riding just fine.
    I'm not trying to sell the Dolomite, I'm just saying if it can do the job then why spend 5 times more? Is it twice as heavy? Does it not move somewhat normal when you pedal or brake?

  123. #723
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    It's about 15 lbs heavier than a real fat bike, it doesn't have the gearing, tires, or drivetrain to handle snow. Adding up the replacement cost, you're at the level of a much better bike. Some people have put the mega range freewheel on it, but that just gives you one low gear, and street gear ratio for the rest. It'll pedal, but depending on your weight and skill it might not be fun at all.

  124. #724
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    77
    15 pounds more is a bit hefty. And it sounds like snow does require a completely different bike. Maybe the Dolomite was made for beach cruising. I've never snow biked so this is new to me. If it will not be a similar experience getting a cheaper mountain bike for summer terrain, then I may have to go with a more expensive FB. Or at least continue researching. Thanks.

  125. #725
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    You said you were 6', fit is another issue. You will need a new longer seat post, but since the frame comes in one size you're not going to have a good fit. You'll need a longer stem too, but now you're upgrading a bike that doesn't fit you, which is a complete waste. If I've learned aborting in 20 years of riding, it's that fit matters more than component level most of the time. But that's when you're starting out at the minimum at least and the dolo isn't even that. You could try, but if you were to replace what really needs replacing you're going to add up the cost and realize that you could have made a better choice. The dolo is made to be a cheap cruiser. Everything on it is cheap. No thought went into function, just price point. That's not a good starting point for anything that's going to take abuse.

  126. #726
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    77
    When I bought my $300 FS Diamondback, it was the best bike decision I could have made. Like I said, rides the same trails and terrain than bikes 10 times as much do. Ride bard, not broken, no upgrades etc. All fun...for a lot less.

    just want to make sure winter riding is a different story. Where spending a lot more is justified. A better bike is not a want, but need. Where the dolomite gets stuck in snow, can't go uphill, or simply breaks...where as the Bikes Direct bikes do not.

  127. #727
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    I posted the math I did previously in this thread, and came up with the cost of my bd Boris. I wouldn't try to ride it before doing those upgrades on much of anything technical. I haven't ridden a fat bike in the snow yet, but i did ride my mtb, so I assume drivetrain and everything else apply. You're looking at minimum 125 for tires, 150 for a crank, lace the back wheel with a freehub and go with a 9 speed 34t at least, maybe 10 with a 36t.cost depends on your wheel building skills, but why even use the rim at that point it's junk so might as well just buy a whole back wheel. That should be around 200 or 250 depending on how nice a wheel it is. Might even be cost beneficial to buy a wheelset depending. Then there's the derailleur, at least 50 bucks for something like a deore shadow, that won't get so jammed up with snow and over and under flex like an sis. Shifter, alivio minimum those are cheap only 20 bucks on ebay. Maybe you want front gears and another 50 for derailleur and shifter and cables. You can get a shifter set for like 30 or 35 on ebay. Brakes are important, the stock ones are probably not going to do a whole lot of anything. I'd do bb7s cause they're the easiest to adjust, so add another 100 or so. Plus the seat post and stem another 50. So anyways it's personal preference how you'd do it, but that's basically what i would do before dragging it into the snow. If you think that you could get away without doing anything to it thats up to you. But the way I ride and what I do, thats the bare minimum for it to meet my expectations.

  128. #728
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fat_tires_are_fun's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    520
    Quote Originally Posted by lethalsvt View Post
    When I bought my $300 FS Diamondback, it was the best bike decision I could have made. Like I said, rides the same trails and terrain than bikes 10 times as much do. Ride bard, not broken, no upgrades etc. All fun...for a lot less.

    just want to make sure winter riding is a different story. Where spending a lot more is justified. A better bike is not a want, but need. Where the dolomite gets stuck in snow, can't go uphill, or simply breaks...where as the Bikes Direct bikes do not.
    Spending a lot more and justifying it is a personal issue. You can buy this bike and give it a try, but if it doesnt fit, you have simply wasted money. If you are in to riding enough that you are on this forum, and you can afford an extra couple hundred, get a better bike.
    Sounds like you are trying to talk yourself in to the fact that this bike is a good idea....at 6 feet tall (you), I can most certainly opine that it is not.
    - MOOTS Mooto X
    - Salsa Fargo
    - Niner RLT9

  129. #729
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    291
    I'm 6'4 and have no issues with the dolomite or beast.

    I enjoy both very much. Have not had a chance to hit snow but I did go on the beach and it was a blast!!

    ..I'm also not trying to turn a geo metro into a sports car either. So I'm content with my minor mods

  130. #730
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    Also when comparing the two, it looks like the BD bike comes stock with a 50mm wide rim while to Dolo has a 100mm, is this better for having the ability to get more grippy tires? Like the on-ones, I have heard good things about them in the snow, in the reviews section of the site.


    Looks like both bikes would need a set of winter tires for the snow, and that they come with more of an all season out of the box.


    If the Dolo can also save 8-9lbs by swapping to the On-Ones and new tubes I think that makes it a more attractive option.This coming from a guy who will most likely only be able to drag his girlfriend out to ride in the snow for an hour or so at a time a few days per snowy months.

  131. #731
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    first, a comparison of a $300 diamondback vs a $200 wallyworld full suspension. I'll assume the DB came with an acera or alevio derailure with an 8-speed trigger shifter. It also had a square taper cartridge bearing bottom bracket. Hubs and wheels were double-wall aluminum rims with a aluminum hub and decent quality quick release axle. These parts are built strong. They aren't as light, but they will handle the same beating as expensive bikes. These parts are about the same quality of parts as you'd get on the BD gravity monster, so you'll have an idea what's coming on that.

    On the other hand, the $200 wally world mountain bike will have a 7-speed freehub gear cluster attached to a lower quality hub and rims. The derailure will be a tourney or lower quality. Not bad, but not as good as the one on your DB. The shifter would probably be non-branded low quality grip shift, and the handlebar would be steel instead of aluminum. This plus grip quality will make a huge difference on extended rides over 30 minutes. The quality of the wally world bike just won't be the same as the DB bike. However, if you are OK with that, willing to do frequent maintenance, and will spend about $50 for used bike parts, the wallyworld bike is acceptable. In general, the components will never match the quality of your DB though.

    Now, comparing the dolo against the gravity monster. The dolo only comes in one size. I'm 6'5" and a 34" inseam, and with a 400mm seatpost (stock seatpost is only 300mm, so 4" shorter), I'm at the limit of minimum insertion level for the seat post. Only about 1" though, so I am pretty comfortable riding it. This is definately a good reason to get the BD monster. Also, the rims on the dolo are 100mm, which is really really fat. I figured if I was going to try a fat bike, I wanted it really fat. Comparing apples to apples, this would put the dolo against the lurch or sturgis, where the price of the dolo really comes out as huge. I figured I'll wait for another year for fatbike tires to come down a bit, and get some replacements then. Also, with use, the brakes on the dolo are starting to show their limitations. After only about 5 hours of medium to hard trail time, the brake calipers are already starting to wear some. The pads are shifting around a lot more inside the calipers.

  132. #732
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    ...Some people have put the mega range freewheel on it, but that just gives you one low gear, and street gear ratio for the rest. ...
    Correct. Which is why the 34T megarange is just the first of the upgrades if you're going on the cheap. Going to a MTN triple front so you can manually choose between 22T and 32T (one for flat/mild-hill, the other for big-hilly/sand/snow), to drive the megarange, so you can drive through the snow or sand, or up a hill. And then a custom stack of the megarange so instead of it providing just a granny gear with a big space beside it, the gears are spaced out to provide more usable selections. Check previous posts, complete with gear inches comparasion charts between stock, and what the various changes in freewheel and chainring bring you.

  133. #733
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by lethalsvt View Post
    just want to make sure winter riding is a different story. Where spending a lot more is justified. A better bike is not a want, but need. Where the dolomite gets stuck in snow, can't go uphill, or simply breaks...where as the Bikes Direct bikes do not.
    Upgrading a Dolo to ride in the sand or snow can be done. It can be done cheap (as discussed in many posts in this thread) or it can be done with more expensive parts (which are actually inexpensive parts, as far as the range of Fat Bike parts go). If you're going to need, or want, the more expensive parts, or you'll be paying someone to do the cheap upgrades, THAT's when you have to be careful that a better value for your dollars is other than a Dolo.

    A Dolo will be heavier, so with some snow or sand that's an issue, so you can go carbon fibre instead.
    As to robustness of frame & components, where do you intend to go? Back country: it may get you there but can you trust it to bring you back? Some places a long walk would be fine, other places you would be at risk. If you're a rider experienced on those types of trails in those conditions, maybe you have the skill set to ride a Dolo there while minimizing the stress on the frame & components, but it could be a ***** to rely upon that in circumstances were your life could be on the line.

    And no, the Dolo is not a "sand cruiser", but a street or urban/flat bike trailer cruiser. You can have issues with soft sand as you have with different snow conditions. A few types of sand, same as for snow, you can ride it stock if it's flat.

  134. #734
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by momikey View Post
    ... a 50mm wide rim while to Dolo has a 100mm, is this better for having the ability to get more grippy tires? ...
    Depends on the tire, the terrain and the conditions.

    Generally, a wider rim allows the tire profile to be flatter for more float - good for sand & snow - but, also good for maximazing the width of the contact patch to the ground for more grip. Lower the PSI and you've got an even larger contact patch, for flatter & larger for more foat, or simply larger for more area to grip with. If you don't need large of a contact patch to grip your terrain/conditions, then you're needing more effort for pedalling for no useful gain. (p.s., if you try that with the stock Dolo tires, you'd better have good legs - there's a reason 120 tpi tires are popular)

    Many prefer the handing from fat tires on a narrower rim for non-sand/snow use, as the tire takes on a rouder profile (but it digs into sand and snow instead of attempting to float). Check the numerious threads where users have generously posted what the tire tracks look like in sand for the various tires/rims/PSI, so you see what the differences are.

    So winter/sand riders have a tendency to prefer 80mm,100mm rims. Summer trail riders tend to prefer 65mm, with a few really liking ~50mm. 65mm or 80mm seems to be the preferred "compromise" when you'll only have one Fat Bike or only one set of wheels, but will be riding year round or through a wide variety of terrains & conditions.

    Your preferences may vary.

  135. #735
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mr pinga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    33

    Re: The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite

    Here my Dolomite.


    sent from my back yard

    To answer a few questions.
    I didn't paint my dolomite. They are sold this colour under the Schwinn name.
    I changed the brakes to bb7's. Alloy bars, stem and seatpost. 34t megarange freewheel. Deore cranks with 32, 22 chainrings, that I shift over with my foot. So far this has worked out well in the 2 big days it has been ridden. XT shadow rear derailleur with XT thumbie. Uprated sealed BB cups.
    The frame bag doesn't go to the bottom so that I can still have a water bottle in the cage.
    I JB welded the freewheel to the rear hub because I know this is a week spot, when you gear down a bike.
    Also running tubeless on original tyres using glade wrap and liquid latex.

    This is a loner bike for friends, I have a surly ICT. All the parts cost me nothing as I had them lying around my workshop (I'm a bike mechanic).

    One other thing I changed was the rotor bolts to some better quality ones. Dont want the heads turning off in a few years when I want to replace a rotor or something.

    I use my fat bikes for exploring the coastlines around NZ.
    Last edited by mr pinga; 10-12-2014 at 10:54 AM.

  136. #736
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    Quote Originally Posted by mr pinga View Post
    Here my Dolomite.


    sent from my back yard


    Looks like you added another cog up front thats smaller and connected it to the stock one, hows that working out on the trails? I would like to do the exact same thing.

  137. #737
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Sure looks nice in white.

    Quote Originally Posted by momikey View Post
    Looks like you added another cog up front thats smaller and connected it to the stock one...
    A double or triple front. And the posts below it for a custom stack freewheel.
    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/dol...l#post11152236

    Chart showing stock freewheel and what you get from a number of different fronts, from the stock 36T down to 28T, and the 22T from a MTN triple. Also showing the MTN triple with the stock freewheel, 34T megarange and various custom stacks of the megarange.
    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-gear-inches-various-cranks-freewheels-sm.jpg

    Or for a 25T (in between the 22T and 28T above), comparing stock vs a single 25T vs. a 22T-32T front off of a MTN triple, for the stock rear or the 34T megarange.
    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/dol...l#post11404506

  138. #738
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    That is a lot of info right there, thank you! I was curious about added just the one cog to the inside of the stock one, seemed like some people are buying new triple or double cranks and the arms are hitting the frame if not on the correct bend. I also saw that a 24t cog on amazon can be had for like $15, so I think it will be a cheap solution. Thanks for posting the charts, I'm gonna start absorbing all the numbers you posted!

  139. #739
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marna_Kazmaier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    115
    Is ANYONE riding a Dolomite "out of the box"? That is, without changing it?
    I am seriously thinking about buying one. But if I have to change everything....I will buy a Salsa Mukluk.

  140. #740
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marna_Kazmaier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by mr pinga View Post
    Here my Dolomite.


    sent from my back yard
    Your Bike looks nice, I like your little Frame Bag (but why not make it the whole area of your open frame?). I like the Dolomite. However? How much (money) do you think you have into your Dolomite, including paint and components?

    I am looking at Fat Bikes and wondering if buying one ready to really go on snow and Mt. Biking, would be better than buying one that might need so many updates.

    I should add that ride a Walmart Bike, and have many miles on it, over 350 since May. We ride pavement, trails and rails to trails. It is a Genesis 29" (in PINK!) I love it. No updates on it. I have been Bike Shopping, but my Genesis fits me so well, we are thinking of just updating it with better components, as needed. It is a Woman's Bike and I am working on (in my mind) a Pink Camo Frame Bag for it with a sling (top angle slung from seat post to handlebars).

    So I am NOT against a Dolomite. I am VERY interested. I just have been shopping and the Dolomite is NOT made as nice as the "others" and I see on this thread that people are making so many changes to them.

    THANKS!

  141. #741
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    So many people are making changes to the Dolomite, so that it can do what they need/want it to do. To get the Dolomite 'out the door' to market at its price point, there was no way they could outfit it for everyone's needs. People are making the changes/upgrades that they need or want. If you're going to need a lot of those for your purposes, watch out how much that will cost, as you can quickly be over the cost of a low end "real" fat bike, that comes equiped for all of the basics you'd expect from a trail capable fat bike.

    So, it comes geared for cruising. If you're doing more than cruising, or more than riding relative flat, you're going to need to change the gearing. This is a topic we've covered over and over and over in this thread. So take a short backup and read this post. http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/dol...l#post11503000

    If you haven't got a lot of coin, there are some cheap and some in expensive ways to do some basic upgrades. But if you have the coin, see if you can test ride one of the low end fat bikes that comes equiped out of the box, then see if you can find a Dolo to test ride.

  142. #742
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    If you have to ask how much things cost, then you probably don't work on bikes.. So add 50 bucks to every 100 you're going to spend for installation at a bike shop. The dolo needs pretty much everything that moves replaced to have the options and adjustability and durability to ride in terrain that doesn't include concrete. I don't know why anyone would dump that much money into any bike, it makes no sense. You still end up with a weak possibly ill fitting frame.

  143. #743
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marna_Kazmaier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    If you're buying the bike to immediately dump money into, you're better off going with a bikes direct bike cause it's gonna be the same amount of money and better.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk
    Do you OWN a Fatty From BikesDirect? I would love to know how much better those bikes are.

  144. #744
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    Yes I OWN one. I don't know why we're capitalizing that lol

    For one it's a khs frame that comes in many sizes to fit your body. That's the most important part of buying a bike. Then there's the drivetrain the wheels the tires the hubs the headset the bottom bracket etc. All the stuff that you want, like changeable chainrings, 9 speed freehub, tires without bricks in them.

    Its impractical to compare them. You're comparing a walmart beach cruiser (that comes without the gears for sand) to a lbs quality fat bike.

  145. #745
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    From my experience and that of many others, it's not as extreme as ou2mame says regarding having to replace *everything* just to go off of concrete, but it does trend that way, and more so the more technical/demanding you get. And very much so if you're going to go backcountry or truly mountain or snow away from help, then there is a safety issue if your components fail (brakes anyone?), or even if they don't fail, they're simply not capable of doing the job well enough. Not to mention the convience of - will the bike get you back from where it got you to?

    And, does the one-size only frame fit you...

  146. #746
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marna_Kazmaier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    If you have to ask how much things cost, then you probably don't work on bikes.. So add 50 bucks to every 100 you're going to spend for installation at a bike shop. The dolo needs pretty much everything that moves replaced to have the options and adjustability and durability to ride in terrain that doesn't include concrete. I don't know why anyone would dump that much money into any bike, it makes no sense. You still end up with a weak possibly ill fitting frame.
    THANK for your replies. I have not worked on bikes in 20 years. I just started riding again this Summer. (we used to ride bicycles over 1000 miles per year) We now ride Daily and I ride for my health. I really would like a Snow Bike, we live in NW SD on 161 acres. There is such a difference of price between the Mongoose and the others, I have been shopping and test riding both at Bike Shops and at Walmart....I am that overweight old lady people see riding bikes around Walmart....as a SERIOUS buyer. <smiles> So I am trying to ask folks that ACTUALLY ride the Dolomites out on trails and on snow, and know bikes, how much money they have added to their bikes.

    THANKS AGAIN EVERYONE FOR THE REPLIES. I really appreciate your input.

  147. #747
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    ...You're comparing a walmart beach cruiser (that comes without the gears for sand)...
    You've done this before. Please stop calling it a beach cruiser. Even with your gears warning, you can end up unintentionally misleading people. Out of the box it can only adequately do beach on well packed sand.

    Out of the box, it's much more accurate to call it a concrete cruiser or a urban bike trail cruiser, provided there aren't much of hills. Yes, stock it can go on some country trails, but for a newbie who doesn't know what's involved in mtn biking or a particular trail could quickly get themselves into "inconvenient" or suddenly into dangerous.

  148. #748
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by Marna_Kazmaier View Post
    ... I really would like a Snow Bike, we live in NW SD on 161 acres. There is such a difference of price between the Mongoose and the others, ...
    O.K. then. A snow bike.
    I rode my Dolo stock in the snow. On the flat trails - fine. Any kind of hill (slope) and it's work. The second there's a real hill or the snow is not packed, with the stock gearing you're screwed. I could fight it through six inches, but it is a fight. One night ride, after & during a heavy snowfall I said **** it and walked it home. Much better with 120 tpi tires, but that doesn't fix the gearing. (you're going to enjoy 120 tpi tires)

    My gut feel: for your needs you can make a Dolo do what you need with some basic upgrades. Cost will vary depending on which parts, source and who does the work. But over the next season or two, as you end up doing all of the upgrades you want to get the ride you want, I strongly believe you would end up spending as much or more than one of the low end "real" fat bikes. For running around on 161 acres in the snow, you don't want to get stranded - there is a real safety issue. You live on 161 acres in SD so you know what I mean. Can you walk back? Can you walk back after injuries sustained in a wipe out by a component failure? Can your cell reach a tower? If you're injured, can someone get to you in time?

    If you LIKE doing bike work, and are confident in the reliability of that work for running around on 161 acres in the winter, and you've got the bucks, then you can go for it.

    But, you'll enjoy riding more if you're riding a bike that does what you really want from the start (maybe a few tweaks or indulgences down the road), and does it better, instead of all those rides where you're fighting to get the bike to take you where you want to go. Simply, more enjoyment in snow or in summer.

    Bottom line: for your needs as stated, if you've got the money to afford one of the low end "real" fat bikes, I believe that the Dolo is not the bike for you.

    To save money, and be safe, DO make sure that the low end "real" fat bike you chose is one that is equipped for snow out of the box (or as close as possible). As in, brakes & tires. The gearing should be fine. Check out the many threads on those bikes to ensure you make an informed choice.

  149. #749
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    I do all my own wrenching, and I have built my last few mtbs, so for me the decision wasn't even swayed by labor prices or lack of knowledge. I wanted to try snow riding on a cheap bike, but after adding what I would do to it, it didn't make any sense. Plus, there's no way I'm going to ride a 50lbs bike. That just won't happen. We've come too far lol

    The Boris is a great bike for the money. Standard parts, unlimited upgrade possibilities, and put of the box it works. I've been riding it in technical trails, beating the hell out of it for every mile on it and it's been great.

    I wish there were other companies making bikes in these price ranges because fat bike prices are so inflated it's ridiculous. But I'm happy with it, and fiscally it makes sense, so I recommend them. If there was another company shipping a fat bike for 600 bucks, or even 500 if you go with the gravity, I'd recommend them too. But bd is the place for affordable bikes.

    And as for it not being a beach cruiser, you're right lol.. Its really not meant for that either out of the box.

  150. #750
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by Marna_Kazmaier View Post
    ...I am that overweight old lady people see riding bikes around Walmart...
    Depending on your weight, to be safe you would NEED to upgrade at least the rear brake on a Dolo, but should be upgrading both front & rear. (if done on the cheap, rear brake first, like a cargo bike, not the front which one would normally make the stronger brake). May or may not matter on the 161 acres, but if you're out on public trails or roads... or have hills.

  151. #751
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marna_Kazmaier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    Yes I OWN one. I don't know why we're capitalizing that lol

    For one it's a khs frame that comes in many sizes to fit your body. That's the most important part of buying a bike. Then there's the drivetrain the wheels the tires the hubs the headset the bottom bracket etc. All the stuff that you want, like changeable chainrings, 9 speed freehub, tires without bricks in them.

    Its impractical to compare them. You're comparing a walmart beach cruiser (that comes without the gears for sand) to a lbs quality fat bike.
    <smiles> Thank you. Sometimes people inject comments without really knowing...I sure appreciate your reply. We looked at the Dolomite the other day (Walmart got in a new shipment, but BOY! they sell quickly! Spearfish, SD is also a College town) Anyway, after looking at the "others" in Bike Shops, I could really see the difference. I guess my biggest question was: Did *I* need the better Fatty. Thanks again.

  152. #752
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    ... I wanted to try snow riding on a cheap bike,...
    The Boris ... I've been riding it in technical trails, beating the hell out of it for every mile on it and it's been great. ...
    Have you had it out in snow yet?

  153. #753
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    I haven't owned a dolo but I have seen one and took a really long good look at it and that's when I realized how much money it would take to bring it to a spec I'd feel confident riding. I haven't been in the snow yet. I got my boris this summer and I live in long Island. I have ridden studded tires on concrete bike trails on a mtb before so I'm not new to riding in the winter. It's just impossible to ride in the trails on a regular bike so that's going to be new to me. But if snows anything like sand, this bike can ride up sand dunes in powder sand with only a decent amount of effort.

  154. #754
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    ... But if snows anything like sand, this bike can ride up sand dunes in powder sand with only a decent amount of effort.
    And I've had the Dolo in snow, but not sand. Hard to compare, but your bike sounds promising. Hopefully she can find threads where riders have had theirs in the snow.

    P.S.
    Marna, go read the thread on the width of the rims before you buy your bike.
    If it's going to be only a snow bike, go for 100mm rims (maximum float, maximum weight distribution).
    If it's going to be a year round bike, consider 80mm or 65mm rims.
    And a warning: once you ride a fat bike in the summer, no matter the rim size, you may forget you have other bikes... so if you make an informed choice up front, you can enjoy even more.
    And NEVER let any partners or friends try it. You may not get it back.

  155. #755
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mr pinga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    33

    Re: The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite

    Here my Dolomite.


    To answer a few questions.
    I didn't paint my dolomite. They are sold this colour under the Schwinn name.
    I changed the brakes to bb7's. Alloy bars, stem and seatpost. 34t megarange freewheel. Deore cranks with 32, 22 chainrings, that I shift over with my foot. So far this has worked out well in the 2 big days it has been ridden. XT shadow rear derailleur with XT thumbie. Uprated sealed BB cups.
    The frame bag doesn't go to the bottom so that I can still have a water bottle in the cage.
    I JB welded the freewheel to the rear hub because I know this is a week spot, when you gear down a bike.
    Also running tubeless on original tyres using glade wrap and liquid latex.

    This is a loner bike for friends, I have a surly ICT. All the parts cost me nothing as I had them lying around my workshop (I'm a bike mechanic).

    One other thing I changed was the rotor bolts to some better quality ones. Dont want the heads turning off in a few years when I want to replace a rotor or something.

    I use my fat bikes for exploring the coastlines around NZ.



    sent from my back yard

  156. #756
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marna_Kazmaier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    O.K. then. A snow bike.
    I rode my Dolo stock in the snow. On the flat trails - fine. Any kind of hill (slope) and it's work. The second there's a real hill or the snow is not packed, with the stock gearing you're screwed. I could fight it through six inches, but it is a fight. One night ride, after & during a heavy snowfall I said **** it and walked it home. Much better with 120 tpi tires, but that doesn't fix the gearing. (you're going to enjoy 120 tpi tires)

    My gut feel: for your needs you can make a Dolo do what you need with some basic upgrades. Cost will vary depending on which parts, source and who does the work. But over the next season or two, as you end up doing all of the upgrades you want to get the ride you want, I strongly believe you would end up spending as much or more than one of the low end "real" fat bikes. For running around on 161 acres in the snow, you don't want to get stranded - there is a real safety issue. You live on 161 acres in SD so you know what I mean. Can you walk back? Can you walk back after injuries sustained in a wipe out by a component failure? Can your cell reach a tower? If you're injured, can someone get to you in time?

    If you LIKE doing bike work, and are confident in the reliability of that work for running around on 161 acres in the winter, and you've got the bucks, then you can go for it.

    But, you'll enjoy riding more if you're riding a bike that does what you really want from the start (maybe a few tweaks or indulgences down the road), and does it better, instead of all those rides where you're fighting to get the bike to take you where you want to go. Simply, more enjoyment in snow or in summer.

    Bottom line: for your needs as stated, if you've got the money to afford one of the low end "real" fat bikes, I believe that the Dolo is not the bike for you.

    To save money, and be safe, DO make sure that the low end "real" fat bike you chose is one that is equipped for snow out of the box (or as close as possible). As in, brakes & tires. The gearing should be fine. Check out the many threads on those bikes to ensure you make an informed choice.
    Thanks for taking the time to write this up. I really appreciate it.
    I thing a Motobecane or really a Mukluk will be the bicycle I need.
    I did kinda grin about the 161 acres. Yes, I can walk it, even in the snow, wind, injured, I was a Sled Dog Musher (many moons ago) so I am pretty tough. <smiles> The best part is, we have access to 15,000 acres all around us. Our closest neighbor is 9 miles from our home. We did NOT have cell service the first five years we were here. None. Nadda. No Service. (I don't like cells anyway)

    Again. Thanks for taking the time to write up your note. I really have been researching and thinking about a Dolomite...yes, I really have been riding them around Walmart! Ha3Name:  racemarnalol.jpg
Views: 1524
Size:  57.7 KB</smiles>
    Last edited by Marna_Kazmaier; 10-12-2014 at 11:37 AM. Reason: add photo

  157. #757
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marna_Kazmaier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    And I've had the Dolo in snow, but not sand. Hard to compare, but your bike sounds promising. Hopefully she can find threads where riders have had theirs in the snow.

    P.S.
    Marna, go read the thread on the width of the rims before you buy your bike.
    If it's going to be only a snow bike, go for 100mm rims (maximum float, maximum weight distribution).
    If it's going to be a year round bike, consider 80mm or 65mm rims.
    And a warning: once you ride a fat bike in the summer, no matter the rim size, you may forget you have other bikes... so if you make an informed choice up front, you can enjoy even more.
    And NEVER let any partners or friends try it. You may not get it back.
    BAHAHAHAH BAHAHHAHAH Thanks! My husband and I have been test riding bikes. I really need something better than what I am riding. He thinks I need a Mt Bike (and I know I do) but I want a FATTY! Last week we took out (from a local shop) a Trek Sky S Mt. Bike and a high dollar ($5000) Fatty (I can not for the life of me remember the name, but Salsa) anyway, we traded back and forth and rode around a park, grass and pavement. I really want a FATTY! I am sure I will end up with both....but I doubt I will buy the Sky S.

    My husband wants to wait til it snows, and the Bike Shop suggested we come back when we get snow to ride them again, and ride the Fatties, and take them for a good ride.

    Thanks again for all the information.

  158. #758
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marna_Kazmaier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by mr pinga View Post
    Here my Dolomite.


    To answer a few questions.
    I didn't paint my dolomite. They are sold this colour under the Schwinn name.
    I changed the brakes to bb7's. Alloy bars, stem and seatpost. 34t megarange freewheel. Deore cranks with 32, 22 chainrings, that I shift over with my foot. So far this has worked out well in the 2 big days it has been ridden. XT shadow rear derailleur with XT thumbie. Uprated sealed BB cups.
    The frame bag doesn't go to the bottom so that I can still have a water bottle in the cage.
    I JB welded the freewheel to the rear hub because I know this is a week spot, when you gear down a bike.
    Also running tubeless on original tyres using glade wrap and liquid latex.

    This is a loner bike for friends, I have a surly ICT. All the parts cost me nothing as I had them lying around my workshop (I'm a bike mechanic).

    One other thing I changed was the rotor bolts to some better quality ones. Dont want the heads turning off in a few years when I want to replace a rotor or something.

    I use my fat bikes for exploring the coastlines around NZ.



    sent from my back yard
    Thank you! It looks very nice (and inviting to ride <smiles>)
    But if you are a Bike Mechanic, could you have just bought a Fatty Bike Frame and built a bike cheaper? (I ma not being a smart elic, I am seriously curious)

  159. #759
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mr pinga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    33
    Quote Originally Posted by Marna_Kazmaier View Post
    Thank you! It looks very nice (and inviting to ride <smiles>)
    But if you are a Bike Mechanic, could you have just bought a Fatty Bike Frame and built a bike cheaper? (I ma not being a smart elic, I am seriously curious)
    The price of $450 NZD for the bike is cheaper than a frame. And I get a wheelset and tyres as well. I started years ago with a pugsley, and this bikes rides better with a lot less flex.

  160. #760
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    I could spend the price of dolo on the drivetrain alone and end up wanting more lol

  161. #761
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    Quote Originally Posted by mr pinga View Post
    The price of $450 NZD for the bike is cheaper than a frame. And I get a wheelset and tyres as well. I started years ago with a pugsley, and this bikes rides better with a lot less flex.

    Thats assuring to hear you like the frame of the dolo over a pugsley from years back. I get that its a heavy bike and hopefully that means the frame can take some stress.

  162. #762
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    It's really the components that are heavy not the frame. The tires and wheels specifically. But a wheelset is more than the dolo lol

  163. #763
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marna_Kazmaier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by mr pinga View Post
    The price of $450 NZD for the bike is cheaper than a frame. And I get a wheelset and tyres as well. I started years ago with a pugsley, and this bikes rides better with a lot less flex.
    Thanks for your reply. Are you saying you like the Dolomite BETTER than the Pugsley???

  164. #764
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by Marna_Kazmaier View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    ...And NEVER let any partners or friends try it. You may not get it back.
    BAHAHAHAH BAHAHHAHAH
    Laugh if you want. This happens all the time. You have been warned.

    Also, make sure you get the fatty before you get another bike. Many people find that after getting a fatty they forget about their other bikes. A fair number end up selling their other bikes.

    And it's cheaper to have two sets of tires, one set for winter and another for summer, than it is to have two bikes. Some people have two wheel sets, with a different rim width for winter vs. summer, like a 100mm set and a 65mm or 50mm set.

  165. #765
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    313
    I think the whole fat bike becoming most fat bikers only bike year round thing gets a bit overplayed in the fat bike forum. I live in MN and a lot if us have fat bikes to survive our horribly long winters. We like our fat bikes and are happy to ride them in snow in winter or sand in summer, but most riders here go back to their regular cross country mtn bike in summer. Only a small percentage use their fat bikes in summer around here. I love my Mukluk in winter, but can't wait to ride my FS once spring comes again.

    Sent from my SPH-L720 using Tapatalk

  166. #766
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    It's the fun factor that puts the gathering dust on the others.
    That and the versatility in where you can go.
    some variations
    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/why-fat-935065.html

    This summer around here I've seen more fat bikes than any season/year before. I'd run into someone with a fat bike around here and ask what they have for another bike, and they seem surprised and go 'oh yeah, I've got a ____. Forgot about that'.

  167. #767
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    313
    I think it's cool that people ride them in summer and many in MN do, but it's still a small percentage. From what I see around here, well over 90% only ride them in winter.

    Sent from my SPH-L720 using Tapatalk

  168. #768
    just ride
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    750
    Hi Dolomite owners, I'm thinking of getting one but have few questions.

    1) Can I use external BB 68/73mm? I have spare 2011 XTR Crankset with BB and would like to use that.
    2) Can I use 10 speed cassette (11-36T XT)?
    3) What is the weight of the frame with fork?
    4) What is the seat post diameter, 28.6 or 27.2?
    5) What is the head tube diameter, 1-1/8?

    Thank you.

  169. #769
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mr pinga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    33
    BB is 100mm so you can't use your Xtr.
    It is a screw on rear wheel, so you can only use screw on freewheels.
    Not sure of weight.
    Seaport diameter is 28.6mm

  170. #770
    just ride
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    750
    Quote Originally Posted by mr pinga View Post
    BB is 100mm so you can't use your Xtr.
    It is a screw on rear wheel, so you can only use screw on freewheels.
    Not sure of weight.
    Seaport diameter is 28.6mm
    Thank you.

  171. #771
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763

    Re: The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite

    Lol oh someone already answered

  172. #772
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    77
    Im thinking because of the Walmart 90 day return policy, get a dolomite and actually use it in the snow (or sand..whatever you plan on getting a fat bike for). If it is fun, works fine, etc, then keep it. Save a crap load. If it is not, then you know for sure and can return it for a full refund.

    My only real concern is the weight and how hard it would be to move it in snow. Ive been reading things all around the web about this bike, and that is the only conclusion I can come to.

    If it is not fun or doesn't work like I hope, then I think I will definitely buy one from bikes direct for around $500ish. One in particular is the Graviity 29Plus. Since I have a full suspension MTB, I like the idea that the Gravity 29Plus can be used as a fat bike AS WELL as a 29 incher solid frame...which would actually be great for paved rail trails which my 26" FS MTB can be slow at times on.

    Anyone have any knowledge of the 29Plus Fat Bike from Bikes Direct? Seems like it would be a logical choice to get the best of both worlds (if this Dolomite thing does not work out)!

  173. #773
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marna_Kazmaier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by lethalsvt View Post
    Im thinking because of the Walmart 90 day return policy, get a dolomite and actually use it in the snow (or sand..whatever you plan on getting a fat bike for). If it is fun, works fine, etc, then keep it. Save a crap load. If it is not, then you know for sure and can return it for a full refund.

    My only real concern is the weight and how hard it would be to move it in snow. Ive been reading things all around the web about this bike, and that is the only conclusion I can come to.

    If it is not fun or doesn't work like I hope, then I think I will definitely buy one from bikes direct for around $500ish. One in particular is the Graviity 29Plus. Since I have a full suspension MTB, I like the idea that the Gravity 29Plus can be used as a fat bike AS WELL as a 29 incher solid frame...which would actually be great for paved rail trails which my 26" FS MTB can be slow at times on.

    Anyone have any knowledge of the 29Plus Fat Bike from Bikes Direct? Seems like it would be a logical choice to get the best of both worlds (if this Dolomite thing does not work out)!
    HOW VERY FUNNY YOU SHOULD ASK THIS QUESTION! About an hour ago I asked the same thing in the Fatty Motobecane Thread on this Fourum

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/mot...75900-141.html

    We went ahead and ordered the Gravity Bullseye Monster, in GRREN, and I can not wait for it to arrive!

    I looked and looked at the Dolomite and test rode (in the store) as well as the high dollar Fatties. Test Rode, fell in love with, then after reading on this thread all of the upgrades made on the Dolo, bought the Gravity.

    Good Luck to you, and let us know how that Dolo Test Ride goes for you on the snow and such.

  174. #774
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    313
    Using the 90 return policy is a great idea. Wait until the snow flies before buying. Snow riding is fun, but very hard on a good bike. Can't imagine riding snow on a Dolomite. First time I rode my Mukluk in snow it was so hard I hated it. Kept with it though. Really like snow riding now, but some days can still stink.

    Sent from my SPH-L720 using Tapatalk

  175. #775
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    77
    They only had the beast at my local Walmart not the Dolo. Im sure my in store testing wont revel the true nature of how good or bad it really is (in the snow, especially).

    I will definitely post after I take a few snow rides. Mostly terrain through trails in the woods, rail trails and street (where I take my mountain bike now). I don't think any bike on the planet can go through deep snow, but for packed snow on trails etc..that's what I intend to test.

    I went through this same thing with my $400 Diamondback Recoil FS mountain bike 3-4 years ago. Everyone said (especially the LBS people).."oh don't buy that, get a Trek, a Specialized, etc" Never buy from a BBB blah blah blah"...

    Well years later, the bike has ridden some of the rockiest, muddiest, highest, etc trails and hasn't missed a step! I ride long and hard, 3 times a week, and it is a blast! It is not as light as bikes 4 times as much, but it is not heavy either (probably 4-5lbs difference which is barely noticeable). All I can say, it has stood the real-life test and was a great decision. I don't know if the Dolo will yield similar results, mainly because the terrain (snow) may indeed require a more expensive bike to maneuver period..so I will see.

    I bike for fun and fitness. Not looking to be the fastest or compete in any races. I understand the need for paying more when it is required...when it is a need, not just a want.

    Will definitely post an honest, unbiased review. Just need some good ol' New England snow (which I am actually looking forward to now with this fat bike thing!!!!)

  176. #776
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    77
    Interesting..I do feel like there might be a good chance that ANY fat bike, cheap or not, can struggle in the snow. I think the 10lb weight difference between the Dolo and another bike like yours or the ones Im looking at on Bikes Direct may indeed feel like 20-30 more because of the snow.

    Mountain biking you can get away with a cheaper bike like I said. Terrain is more forgiving than snow. Really interested to find out first hand!!

  177. #777
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Marna_Kazmaier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by lethalsvt View Post
    They only had the beast at my local Walmart not the Dolo. Im sure my in store testing wont revel the true nature of how good or bad it really is (in the snow, especially).

    I will definitely post after I take a few snow rides. Mostly terrain through trails in the woods, rail trails and street (where I take my mountain bike now). I don't think any bike on the planet can go through deep snow, but for packed snow on trails etc..that's what I intend to test.

    I went through this same thing with my $400 Diamondback Recoil FS mountain bike 3-4 years ago. Everyone said (especially the LBS people).."oh don't buy that, get a Trek, a Specialized, etc" Never buy from a BBB blah blah blah"...

    Well years later, the bike has ridden some of the rockiest, muddiest, highest, etc trails and hasn't missed a step! I ride long and hard, 3 times a week, and it is a blast! It is not as light as bikes 4 times as much, but it is not heavy either (probably 4-5lbs difference which is barely noticeable). All I can say, it has stood the real-life test and was a great decision. I don't know if the Dolo will yield similar results, mainly because the terrain (snow) may indeed require a more expensive bike to maneuver period..so I will see.

    I bike for fun and fitness. Not looking to be the fastest or compete in any races. I understand the need for paying more when it is required...when it is a need, not just a want.

    Will definitely post an honest, unbiased review. Just need some good ol' New England snow (which I am actually looking forward to now with this fat bike thing!!!!)
    I could have written this post, only my Mt. Bike is a Genesis 29", we bought at....Walmart. They are actually really nice bikes. I ride out here on the Prairie on Gumbo Soil or Benanite....the stuff they make clumpy kitty litter out of. <sighs> It is TOUGH STUFF! It makes very very fine dust that gets into the parts of our bikes....but there Genesis have really held up.

    I do need to upgrade my Mt Bike soon. Why I am interested in the 29PLUS. I have been looking at a 2015 Trek Marlin 5, nice bike and I like the men's bikes, they have more frame room for Frame Bags....I am getting ready to make myself.

    I too ride fun and fitness. And it is working for me. <smiles>

    I rode the Dolo around Walmart to check out the feel and the shifting and all. I knew it would ride much different on other surfaces.

  178. #778
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by lethalsvt View Post
    ... wont revel the true nature of how good or bad it really is (in the snow, especially). I will definitely post after I take a few snow rides. ... I don't think any bike on the planet can go through deep snow, but for packed snow on trails etc..that's what I intend to test....
    As previously posted, here's what a stock Dolo is like in the snow. As explained many times in this thread to many newbies - and with that info available to anyone who bothers to read - the Dolo comes stock geared as a cruiser, not geared like 99.999% of the fat bikes. Therefore, you're likely going to want to fix/upgrade that...
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    O.K. then. A snow bike.
    I rode my Dolo stock in the snow. On the flat trails - fine. Any kind of hill (slope) and it's work. The second there's a real hill or the snow is not packed, with the stock gearing you're screwed. I could fight it through six inches, but it is a fight. One night ride, after & during a heavy snowfall I said **** it and walked it home. Much better with 120 tpi tires, but that doesn't fix the gearing. (you're going to enjoy 120 tpi tires).
    So if you want to enjoy other than nicely packed snow, or other than flat, you're going to want to improve the gearing. Look back in this thread for options. For more enjoyment, 120 TPI tires.

    If you'd like to find out what Fat Bikes can do in the snow, rather than speculate, or have to wait until you try it, why don't you go see if you can find a Fat Bike forum, where people who've ridden Fat Bikes in the snow have posted their experiences, and what gearing & tires work in what conditions...

  179. #779
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    77
    I did..and actually saw a few people ride stock Beasts and Dolomites in the snow (youtube) as well as favorable reviews of actual snow riding.

    Because of all the mixed reviews, and because of my personal experience with a BBB store Diamondback, I think at least it is worth trying out. Especially with the 90 day return policy, it seems like a no brainer.

    I respect your opinion and realize it may well be suited for a cruiser type environment rather than snow. But since there were definitely some people who have had good success (again, through forums and random videos), and with the return policy on top, I think anyone in a situation like me would be suited at least trying.

    Because worst that can happen..you test drive a fat bike for free and realize: "Hey, this fat bike thing in the snow is too cold, period. Or the snow is just not adequate in my area for ANY fat bike. Return, no cost. Or hey, this bike sucks but I like fat biking and just need something a little more suited like a lot of people say...and when I do, I will really appreciate the difference now that I know". Return, no cost, buy a better (perhaps BD bike). Or "hey, this bike is great and so much fun" Keep it...out $250 total.


  180. #780
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by lethalsvt View Post
    ... Or hey, this bike sucks but I like fat biking and just need something a little more suited like a lot of people say...
    Then the 'danger' is that you get one of the rare lemons delivered, or that the quality of the Dolo and/or that it's geared in cruiser range, means that you don't like the experience and mistakenly attribute it to Fat Bikes, instead of to the specifics of your cruiser Dolo in snow experience. So keep that in mind when you're trying to determine if you like:
    - fat biking
    - snow biking
    - the Dolo, stock, geared in cruiser range, on hills or on/in snow
    Or gently put a used triple Mtn on the front and try that at 32T and 22T for a more meaningful test in the snow and on hills.

  181. #781
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Or gently put a used triple Mtn on the front and try that at 32T and 22T for a more meaningful test in the snow and on hills.
    For anything but road use, this needs to be done.

    On a side note, based on how nice the people at your wally world are, bikes fall under a different return policy. They must be in "new" and "unused" condition. Of course, you could always wash it.

  182. #782
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    ... On a side note, based on how nice the people at your wally world are, bikes fall under a different return policy. They must be in "new" and "unused" condition. Of course, you could always wash it.
    Buy it online, get it delivered to your local store, pick the box up at the store. You don't want them assembling it and riding it around back before you have a chance to lube it before you ride it.
    If you decide to return it, get "permission" from online "where" you purchased it, then with that in hand return the bike to the store, just in case. No return shipping costs.

  183. #783
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267

    Copied from what I wrote on BBB forum

    So the Dolo ended up getting delivered a day early and made it in great shape, no dents on the box. After a regrease and adjustment of the wheels/brakes things seemed alright. I replaced the cup seals with the recommended upgrade $10 amazon part and the axle rolls much easier. After that was done I added the 24T sprocket to lighten the load up on my legs. This thing is awesome and I rarely need to drop below 3rd gear on hills. All and all I have an extra $25 into this bike and I was all over hardpack inclined trails today making me think this thing will be fine on snow. I also received one of the newer models that has a different set of tires than the first editions. Tires are about 2lbs lighter each (2200grams each) not great but much more aggressive tread.


    I really enjoyed having this thing to ride the past few days.


















    Cruise gear---Hill,snow gear




    Also, for anyone who owns this bike, this lower gear improves the chainline greatly to a straighter line.


  184. #784
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Interesting!
    Both the sprocket and the new rubber.

    Could you post a full photo of the tire?
    And:
    - what's the widest width of the tire?
    - what's the clearance between the inside of the chain stays and the tire at its widest?

  185. #785
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Interesting!
    Both the sprocket and the new rubber.

    Could you post a full photo of the tire?
    And:
    - what's the widest width of the tire?
    - what's the clearance between the inside of the chain stays and the tire at it's widest?
    For you sir I will go get that info right now, your posts have helped me out a ton, be right back with the info.

  186. #786
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    Sorry for the dirty tires, we just got back from the forest.







    Shows 0.840


  187. #787
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Interesting. 3/8" narrower than those on my Dolo.
    Nicer for the chain clearing the tire. Any issues when the chain is bouncing around on a trail?

    So the smaller tire size contributes to its lower mass. I wonder how supple (rolling resistance) it is compared to the original stock tires. Have you ridden a Dolo or Beast with the original stock tires?

    Any 'brand' on the sidewalls?

    What PSI are you running?

    And, since you seem to be in the mood for measuring, with no one on the bike (sitting under it's own weight), what's the height off a flat floor to the centre of the axle?

    p.s.
    I didn't say earlier, but thanks for documenting what you did as you went along. I always seem to think of that afterwards.

  188. #788
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Interesting. 3/8" narrower than those on my Dolo.
    Nicer for the chain clearing the tire. Any issues when the chain is bouncing around on a trail?

    So the smaller tire size contributes to its lower mass. I wonder how supple (rolling resistance) it is compared to the original stock tires. Have you ridden a Dolo or Beast with the original stock tires?

    Any 'brand' on the sidewalls?

    What PSI are you running?

    And, since you seem to be in the mood for measuring, with no one on the bike (sitting under it's own weight), what's the height off a flat floor to the centre of the axle?

    p.s.
    I didn't say earlier, but thanks for documenting what you did as you went along. I always seem to think of that afterwards.

    So, I only road the bike for 20min the night before around midnight in the pitch dark after I assembled it. I decided to do the new cog right off the back. So I have no real idea of how the stock 1st editions or beasts ride to compare it to. However the chain never fell off once in the 10miles or so today and I was all over boulders in the lower gear.

    I can say that at 8psi(how the wheels were sent) the tire seemed to self-steer a ton. At 14psi today one the trails(mostly flat hardpack) i spent half the ride with no hands cause the bike was so smooth. SO I can safely say that releaved the tire steer. I would like to experiment with a few psi lower just to see how much more absorbent riding over bumps would be.

    I honestly think these are left over tires from some manufacturer, or maybe im just a conspiracy theorist. But it really seems like a logo has been removed from the sidewall. I will try to get a high res shot of that tomorrow in the light.


    From the floor to the bottom of the axle housing is 11.25'', I had to use a measuring tape and not my micrometer.

  189. #789
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    Sorry I didn't post this back yesterday. Got tied up, so I copied from the BBB forum this morning,

    Uploaded some more pics of the tires, maybe someone can name the MFG logo. Either way they hold up well in the mud and on hills. I had an OEM stem and metal brake levers from a specialized hardrock that make the riding position much more comfortable on this bike for long rides and the metal break levers make me feel like I'm not going to snap them with my hand like the plastic ones did. Also only about 30miles on the bike and the breaks are wearing in nicely. Almost all the slack is out of the cable for break in and I can lock the wheels pretty well.



    So the way I see it is that im in this bike $275 so far and I have a sturdy(but heavy) frame. Decent tires that will take me on moderate trails. 100mm wide rims, 14 speeds and nice enough brakes and a rear derailer stock. So the modding might already be done. At the most a better seat and water bottle holder. So <$300 has gone a long way. Time will tell how the bike likes the snow.








    And here is where it looks like a logo has been rubbed off









  190. #790
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by momikey View Post
    ... However the chain never fell off once in the 10miles or so today and I was all over boulders in the lower gear...
    From the floor to the bottom of the axle housing is 11.25'', I had to use a measuring tape and not my micrometer.
    I was wondering how the chain may have bounced around and contacted the sidewall of the tire, wearing it down over time.
    And from floor to the center of the axle (bike sitting straight up) is the radius, double that and we know the height of the tire to compare to others (gear inches, etc.).

    I don't recognize that tire. Perhaps others will.

  191. #791
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    Sorry the 11.5'' is from floor to BB axle, I'll get you the floor to rear axle measurement cause I had no clue thats what you were looking for. No real chain whip on the tiers even in 1st gear BTW. I did remove 2 links though cause the stock gear even had some slack in it.

  192. #792
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    floor to rear axle is 14.5"

  193. #793
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    291
    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    For anything but road use, this needs to be done.

    On a side note, based on how nice the people at your wally world are, bikes fall under a different return policy. They must be in "new" and "unused" condition. Of course, you could always wash it.
    I disagree with your first statement. I rode my bike on the beach no problem I assume snow is roughly the same.

    And I also live in a hilly area. I can ride this bike in neighborhoods I would have to walk my beast.

  194. #794
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by ImaBum View Post
    ... I assume snow is roughly the same...
    You've made a lot of assumptions in your posts. Don't mislead others with assumptions.

  195. #795
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    For flat ground, the stock gearing is fine. With the 22T chainring up front, you can get up pretty much any hill. I tried the dolo with stock gearing on trails (lots of hills over 15 degree incline) and although it can be done, it wasn't easy. Had to stand and mash, which is a great way to brake stuff. After a gear swap, I'm climbing up the mountain, although very slowly.

    And by trails, I mean actual trails with rocks and roots and hills, not asphalt paths through the neighborhood. The old style tires work OK for dirt trails at 13-15psi, but bump absorption is completely gone. Really wish walmart had sent them out with the new tires. Started seeing them about a week after I ordered mine. Does anybody have both types to compare the flexibility. The new tred is obviously better for off road.

  196. #796
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    267
    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    For flat ground, the stock gearing is fine. With the 22T chainring up front, you can get up pretty much any hill. I tried the dolo with stock gearing on trails (lots of hills over 15 degree incline) and although it can be done, it wasn't easy. Had to stand and mash, which is a great way to brake stuff. After a gear swap, I'm climbing up the mountain, although very slowly.

    And by trails, I mean actual trails with rocks and roots and hills, not asphalt paths through the neighborhood. The old style tires work OK for dirt trails at 13-15psi, but bump absorption is completely gone. Really wish walmart had sent them out with the new tires. Started seeing them about a week after I ordered mine. Does anybody have both types to compare the flexibility. The new tred is obviously better for off road.




    Watts, did you need to remove any links from your chain when you went with the smaller front chainring? I added a 24t to my Dolo and removed 2 links because of some slip I was having but couldn't tell if it was the chain or that my spocket wasn't completely tightened down parallel to the OEM crank/cog, it is now. I have seen a few threads about what tire pressure to run for certain terrain, but since I don't know this new model do you have any suggestion of what psi I should run. It seems to be a guess and check thing.


    P.S.

    i agree with you about the lower gearing, I have a 20 foot hill in the back yard that's at least a 30 degree incline. I like to test out the bikes on it when new tires or pedals come in to test the claims of great grip. So I had no real chance of making it up on the stock front sprocket, but with the new 24, I can ride up in 2nd or 3rd gear with no slip even on a wet day. Really impressed with the traction from the bike so far in wet/slippery conditions.

  197. #797
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,763
    Tire pressure is personal preference. It depends on terrain, speed, riding style, etc.. I will raise the pressure when it's dry and lower it when it's wet on the same trail. I'll also air down and pump it back up depending on how it's changing. So I wouldn't look to others for psi recommendations, it's up to you. If you're sliding out and not grabbing lower it. If you're smacking your rims or getting self steer, raise it a bit.

  198. #798
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    Quote Originally Posted by momikey View Post
    Watts, did you need to remove any links from your chain when you went with the smaller front chainring?
    The stock derailure is a mid-length cage, so changing to a 22T chainring, guaranteed you'll need to remove some links.

    However, I don't have dirrect experience with it to know how many links. I swapped freewheel, chain and derailure shortly after I did some demo riding in stock configuration. I run a 29T chainring up front with an 8-speed 14-32 freewheel in back. Can get up most hills, and still have enough top end speed for road use. The only hills I can't get with this gear range are the long steep one's I'd normally get off and walk anyway. So much more fun to catch my breath on the uphill and have energy for the downhill.

  199. #799
    Super Moderator SuperModerator
    Reputation: AVL-MTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,125
    Has anyone of you guys or girls taken the Dolomite on a rough singletrack? Will it handle well? No bent frames?

  200. #800
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    Here's some links to one of the trails I've taken my dolo on. I weigh about 240 geared up. I'm not worried about the frame. I have some reservations with the fork, but as of yet, no problems. Trail is mostly less than ~4-6" diameter rocks & roots. some rock gardens. I haven't jumped it other than rolling off some 8" dirt benchs created by roots.

    Shawnee Mission Park MTB Trails 4-20-13 - YouTube
    Mountain Biking Shawnee Mission Park - YouTube
    Not my videos. Please forgive the guy that spends 30 seconds staring at a trail sign.

Page 4 of 16 FirstFirst 1234567814 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Rolf Dolomite Wheel set for sale
    By Wiplash in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-13-2013, 03:38 PM
  2. Semi-rad.com took a jab at us!
    By jmmUT in forum Off Camber (off topic)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-15-2013, 10:30 PM
  3. Rolf Dolomite Disc cracked rear rim?! WTF?
    By Wasmachineman NL in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-01-2012, 01:09 AM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-02-2012, 10:57 PM
  5. Semi OT
    By pisgahproductions in forum North & South Carolina
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 08-11-2011, 02:48 PM

Members who have read this thread: 66

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.