Doesn't the offset design of the Moonlander significantly reduce the wheel strength?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Doesn't the offset design of the Moonlander significantly reduce the wheel strength?

    It looks super iffy only lacing up one side of the rim, can anyone shed some light on this? (:

  2. #2
    will rant for food
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    The, uh, the spokes go to both hub flanges.

    The spoke center line is not flush with the hub bisection line. The frame compensates for this so that the tire ends up centered beneath you. The mild dish in a built Moonlander wheel isn't a HUGE concern.

    Offset designs aren't the end of the world. The car you drive on has asymmetrical rims so that the brakes fit inside, etc.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  3. #3
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    You're a few years late worrying about this, Dude.
    In theory (and probably in reality), the wheels are not as strong as a comparably sized symmetrical wheel, but there are thousands of Pugsleys and Moonies out there and I haven't seen or heard of any wheel failures resulting from this issue. Maybe some will come out of the woodwork as a result of your question. I beat the snot out of my Pugs and had no problems.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    The, uh, the spokes go to both hub flanges.

    The spoke center line is not flush with the hub bisection line. The frame compensates for this so that the tire ends up centered beneath you. The mild dish in a built Moonlander wheel isn't a HUGE concern.

    Offset designs aren't the end of the world. The car you drive on has asymmetrical rims so that the brakes fit inside, etc.
    Thanks for the quick reply! I kinda get that it's on both hub flanges, but what I'm wondering is if you only lace one side of the rim, doesn't that make it not very strong? I actually really like the idea of the offset build, I just don't get that one bit! I've bought a Moonlander which is why I'm asking haha, picking it up tommorow!! (very excited!!)


    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP View Post
    You're a few years late worrying about this, Dude.
    In theory (and probably in reality), the wheels are not as strong as a comparably sized symmetrical wheel, but there are thousands of Pugsleys and Moonies out there and I haven't seen or heard of any wheel failures resulting from this issue. Maybe some will come out of the woodwork as a result of your question. I beat the snot out of my Pugs and had no problems.
    haha I kinda figured, just got a deal on a Moonlander I couldn't pass up so I bought it! That was my thinking too, never heard of anyone having problems but it doesn't look very strong. Thanks for clearing things up, and reassuring me! I won't worry about it then (:

  5. #5
    will rant for food
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    Cool.

    First time you completely bottom the rim against something hard and sticky-outie, you'll be like OOHHHH I get it.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by OfficerFriendly View Post
    It looks super iffy only lacing up one side of the rim, can anyone shed some light on this? (:


    With a properly offset rim it builds up a wheel that's stronger than a typical non-offest MTB wheel. That's not an accident.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    Cool.

    First time you completely bottom the rim against something hard and sticky-outie, you'll be like OOHHHH I get it.
    I know right! I'm going to pick it up now, so, so excited! And I hope the rim doesn't completely bottom :S But I do hope I have that aha moment ;D

    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post


    With a properly offset rim it builds up a wheel that's stronger than a typical non-offest MTB wheel. That's not an accident.
    I'm sorry, but I don't get the diagram, are we looking at the spoke tension here? And I really, really hope that's true!!!

  8. #8
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    The red line is the centerline of the bike.
    The blue lines are the spokes.
    The rectangles are the flanges.

    We are looking at spoke tension (which is very closely symmetric) and bracing angles.

  9. #9
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    Tempest in a tea cup, looks can be deceiving, ride the snot out of it and smile!
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



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  10. #10
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    And don't ever turn left.

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