Crankset on a Fat Bike. Single v Double?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Crankset on a Fat Bike. Single v Double?

    What are the considerations when looking at Cranksets on a FB?
    Fat Bike for a Fat Bloke

  2. #2
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    What kind of riding are you planning on doing on your fatbike? Letís start there.
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  3. #3
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    Mainly cross country, dirt trails, through woods.

    Use all seasons over similar terrain. Ie dusty, wet and muddy. Some snow although shorter season.

    Thanks


    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    What kind of riding are you planning on doing on your fatbike? Letís start there.
    Fat Bike for a Fat Bloke

  4. #4
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    I have xx1 on my one and only fatbike that I've owned but there is NOWAY I'll ever own anything with a double front chainring again
    I have a HT and will be either buying a new HT with XX1 or changing it over with a new groupo (although I'm hardly riding it since I have owned my FB)

    I ride just as you described and it's perfect
    I just got back from a 6 hr ride with over 3000m of climbing some over 25% through forest single track , fire trail and some sealed bike path
    There has never. Even been a time I thought it needed another gear
    Cheers
    IP

  5. #5
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    I always put two crank sets on my fatbikes, so I vote double crank sets.

  6. #6
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    i ran mine 1x9 on my fatty, best set up ever 32T NM chainring, i ride mostly tropical, muddy, sandy, rooty trail, will short share climbs and decants.

  7. #7
    turtles make me hot
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    I currently have a double on mine. I'm probably going to swap it out to a single.
    I like turtles

  8. #8
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    Single for me on a fatboy. Works perfect for single track and climbs here in the northeast. I also took it to the beach in Maryland and gearing was perfect for that also. Running a 30t front and a 42 wolf tooth rear. Took out the 15t on an 11-36 cassette. Perfect for what I do. Spend most of my time in the center of the cassette.

  9. #9
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    Double. I figure fat bikes are all about difficult conditions. Lots of times I've been out in several inches of snow and never got out of my granny.

  10. #10
    All fat, all the time.
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    Two crank sets? Sweet, pics!

    Quote Originally Posted by iscariot View Post
    I always put two crank sets on my fatbikes, so I vote double crank sets.

  11. #11
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    I have an xx1 single on mine. I'm very happy with it. I think that you need less range with a fat bike than a skinny tire mountain bike. I don't feel that you need any lower gearing than normal, and I don't feel that you need as much high end because the speeds that you get with the same effort on a pedaling downhill aren't as high.

  12. #12
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    I prefer my XX1 set ups for regular mountain biking, but my new bike this winter will probably have a double for fatbiking in the snow. A 28t front with 10-42 rear would probably work for me in most snow riding conditions, but the idea of spending so much time wearing down the irreplaceable alloy 42t cog on an expensive cassette is not very appealing to me. The 32t up front seems like way too stiff of a gear for the snow riding that I do, and I'm in pretty darn good shape.

  13. #13
    rth009
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    I vote for double as I prefer to have a nice broad gear range and I don't have the hatred for front derailleurs that others seem to have, especially with the new clutch rear ders. Ive only ridden a few hours on bikes with 1x11, but I was irritated by not being able to dump/gain a bunch of gears quickly like you can with a front der. For a fatty I'd get 24-38 cranks (or 22-36 if you really like it low) and a 11-36 cassette.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rth009 View Post
    I vote for double as I prefer to have a nice broad gear range and I don't have the hatred for front derailleurs that others seem to have, especially with the new clutch rear ders. Ive only ridden a few hours on bikes with 1x11, but I was irritated by not being able to dump/gain a bunch of gears quickly like you can with a front der. For a fatty I'd get 24-38 cranks (or 22-36 if you really like it low) and a 11-36 cassette.
    What this guy said. I recently upgraded my drivetrain from 2x9 to 2x10 and did the math and a few rides to see if I'd be happy giving up any gears on the high or low end. I decided that I did not want to lose any of 'em. Ditching my big ring when I went from 3x to 2x was as far as I'm willing to go.

  15. #15
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    Crankset on a Fat Bike. Single v Double?-dscn1421.jpg

    And that was in Arizona!

    Funnyness aside, if you've convinced yourself you can't climb without a granny gear, you can't climb without a granny gear, it's that simple.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post

    Funnyness aside, if you've convinced yourself you can't climb without a granny gear, you can't climb without a granny gear, it's that simple.
    If it's all in your head, you should be able to climb a 40% grade with a 46x11 gear.

  17. #17
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    Crankset on a Fat Bike. Single v Double?

    If your goal is weight savings, 1x10 or XX1 is the obvious choice. I agree that when blazing new trail in fresh powder or climbing/cleaning rocky and rooty gnar, the big mamma jamma granny is the trick. That's why I run a One Up Components 42T on all my 1X10 set ups.

    http://www.oneupcomponents.com/colle...tooth-sprocket

    It's fantastic when upgrading anything that isn't XX1. For $90 bucks you can get the same range as XX1 without spending $400 on an XX1 cassette, $150 on a free hub conversion, $40 on a XX1 chain, $60 on the chainring up front, $350 on a XX1 Derailleur, and another $200 in the XX1 shifter and cables. Sure, XX1 is lighter and performs fantastic but when upgrading an existing bike, it just makes sense to spend the $1100 difference on the 1UpC 42T. Just pull the cassette, put the 42T on, toss the 17T, replace the 15 with the supplied 16, add a few links or replace chain and go climb!


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  18. #18
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    I largely agree, but would like to mention that although you get the 42t low, you do not get the 10t high. This is probably not a big deal for non-racers & fatbikers, but removing an upper/mid-range cog for some might be. This conversion still propably offers the best value for most.
    Quote Originally Posted by 2FewDaysOnTrail View Post
    If your goal is weight savings, 1x10 or XX1 is the obvious choice. I agree that when blazing new trail in fresh powder or climbing/cleaning rocky and rooty gnar, the big mamma jamma granny is the trick. That's why I run a One Up Components 42T on all my 1X10 set ups.

    OneUp Components US - 40/42T Sprocket + 16T

    It's fantastic when upgrading anything that isn't XX1. For $90 bucks you can get the same range as XX1 without spending $400 on an XX1 cassette, $150 on a free hub conversion, $40 on a XX1 chain, $60 on the chainring up front, $350 on a XX1 Derailleur, and another $200 in the XX1 shifter and cables. Sure, XX1 is lighter and performs fantastic but when upgrading an existing bike, it just makes sense to spend the $1100 difference on the 1UpC 42T. Just pull the cassette, put the 42T on, toss the 17T, replace the 15 with the supplied 16, add a few links or replace chain and go climb!


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  19. #19
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    I will say that I have lusted after a X01 or XX1 conversion for my fat bike for some time. The range seems like it would be no problem, the simplicity (1 derailleur instead of 2), and the improved chain line is a big attraction. The weight savings would be a bonus as well. Everyone I know that has it loves it but I just can't get past the $400 cassette replacement cost.

  20. #20
    Nemophilist
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    Hey;

    Of course, lots of people are riding Fatbikes these days just like they were your average trail bike. If you will be using your Fatbike as they were originally intended - running over terrain where other bikes likely can't go, and/or in conditions where they are useless - as well as more "normal" usage, then a double ring is a smart move. You may not need granny that much, but there will come a time... and I'm out to RIDE. I hate to give up and have to walk!

    YMMV.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  21. #21
    aka bOb
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    Lovin my x01 and it cost me about $775 not $1100 and actually if you subtract the drivetrain I sold that it replaced it only cost me $525. That being said I am not looking forward to the day I need to replace a $300 cassette.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtuck1 View Post
    I will say that I have lusted after a X01 or XX1 conversion for my fat bike for some time. The range seems like it would be no problem, the simplicity (1 derailleur instead of 2), and the improved chain line is a big attraction. The weight savings would be a bonus as well. Everyone I know that has it loves it but I just can't get past the $400 cassette replacement cost.
    This is why there are options out there that save serious weight but don't cost as much as the full XX1 setup.

    You don't need crazy expensive cranks. I got XX1s for around $280 on amazon a while back. Got raceface turbines for something like $180 or 200 about 6 months ago. The RF cranks are a bit heavier, but you're still going to save weight over OEM X5s and other boat anchors. Then put a narrow-wide ring on the RF cranks. The XX1s are even more versatile, taking down to a 28t ring, pretty cool. Then run an X9 derailleur and standard 11-36 cassette. You get plenty of range for winter riding and save some serious weight. If that's not enough, do one of the 40t swaps out back. Again, nowhere near the cost of plunking down for an XX1 crank, derailleur, chain, cassette and freehub body/hub That's probably somewhere around 3x the cost or more of upgrading to just a decent 1x10 setup.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  23. #23
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    if you plan on riding snow, I'd suggest sticking with a double, here in NY there are snow conditions that end up requiring more spin than torque... you might be able to get down near there with the 42 tooth... but maybe not.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by twright205 View Post
    if you plan on riding snow, I'd suggest sticking with a double, here in NY there are snow conditions that end up requiring more spin than torque... you might be able to get down near there with the 42 tooth... but maybe not.
    You.re not gonna get quite as low as a typical 22x38 granny with a 28x42 setup. The 28x42 gear is roughly equal to a 22x33 gear. And that's with a 28t chainring, which means you'll give up some high end ratios. You may not care, but if you're used to a double or triple chainring crank, you might feel like you're spinning like a clown. Play around with a gear inch calculator (like this one: Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator ) to see what the effects would be. Then ride your current 2x or 3x setup and limit yourself to the corresponding ratios to see if you could live without the gears you'd be giving up.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by twright205 View Post
    if you plan on riding snow, I'd suggest sticking with a double, here in NY there are snow conditions that end up requiring more spin than torque... you might be able to get down near there with the 42 tooth... but maybe not.
    Dang not sure how I have been doing it the last couple of years

    Edit: and a 26x42 will give the same ratio as a 22x36 with a top end of around 18-19 mph at 90rpm.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    Dang not sure how I have been doing it the last couple of years
    Exactly. I'm not against having gearing, but to put it in perspective, we've gone from 24t grannys paired up with 30t cassettes in 15 years to 22t grannys and 36t cassettes. We've made things way easier and forgotten that it was possible to ride with other gearing. If you NEED the gearing, you NEED the gearing (see above), but to claim that you NEED the gearing because you live in "x" state or whatever, is ridiculous.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  27. #27
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    I'll just jump in here to really stir the pot ... Triple crank rings - standard old school MTB 44-32-22 with 11-36 on the rear.

    80% of my riding is on either groomed ski trail in the winter or paved bike trail in summer as I ride the bike more for my daily commute than anything. I use that big ring all the time. All. The. Time. I love it. For the riding I do, I don't know that a 2x or 1x would feel right. Then again, I've never tried it.

    However, I am thinking of upgrading from the Pugs to something a bit flashier and newer, so a 2x might be in my future. Who knows.

    Calculating gear inches and all that just hurts my head. I just ride where it feels good.

  28. #28
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    Good comments above.

    Every rider is different, and the type of riding they prefer is different. Some guys benefit from a big ring, others do not.

    I will say, changing to a 1x9 helped me become a stronger rider quicker than anything else. Without the granny as a bailout, you push through the climbs & get stronger.

  29. #29
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    shark
    is that my problem, I rely on my triple chain ring and can't climb fast.

  30. #30
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    I vote double. Then again on my typical riding loop there is a big downhill on a gravel road near the trails that I love to speed test on. 35.1mph is my fastest so far, couldn't do that on a single and still have the flexibility to ride trails.

  31. #31
    All fat, all the time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
    shark
    is that my problem, I rely on my triple chain ring and can't climb fast.
    Haha, you just need to use the bigger ring

    Fair warning, when I ran 1x9 it was in Indiana....
    I have since put my granny back on after moving to terrible Idaho.
    Time will tell if my 1x10 plan will work on the new bike....... These 6 mile climbs could prove otherwise ....

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