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Thread: Commuting

  1. #1
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    Commuting

    Does anyone commute with there pugs.... I think I'm gonna try it tomorrow morning if I'm not to lazy I hate cold weather lol.....my pugs is set up for a 1x9 and my commute is about 12 miles do you think this is doable or am I asking for trouble?

  2. #2
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    Without knowing anything about you or the ride it is hard to answer your question. The Pugs should not be a limiting factor. I have commuted a similar distance on a Fatback. Get good lights and wear bright clothes just like any other bike commute.

  3. #3
    How much does it weigh?
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    I ride 3km to work and back every day Haha.

    If I had to ride 10km.. I'd still do it if I had some nice trails to ride on the way there.

    On the road though... I'd rather not, just because of the drivers around here. I do about 1.5km of trail on the way to work... which is not bad, the other 1.5km can be frustrating with people in cars who have to pass you just to get to that red light... only for me to pass them again in the bike lane mere seconds later.

    It's just one section of road that bothers me on the way to work... no bike lane when I first get on the road... then the next block it's bike lane.. and I always end up passing the people who swerve around me a few moments later when they have to slow down for the red light.

  4. #4
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    I commute with my Pugs daily in WI. Just make sure you put on some long johns under your skirt and go for it.

    Sorry just kidding the Pugs has put life back into cold weather commuting...Enjoy and it's not cold until your eyeballs fog up.
    Last edited by bdundee; 03-11-2011 at 04:50 AM.

  5. #5
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    i have been commuting to and from work a couple days a week on my Mukluk this winter. Its not fast, but it is comfortable and stable. I must admit my commute is only about 3mi each way.

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    I've been commuting on my Pugsley, nearly everyday since I bought it in December. I have a 5 mile round trip commute, so it's not too tough, but a whole lot of fun.

  7. #7
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    My commute is12.5 miles each way with a 1000 ft climb on the return ride. You'll burn through rubber on the fattie, but it's definitely fun. I'm 160 lbs and use 9-10 psi front and rear and the tires feel rock hard when rolling. You might have to adjust pressure if you're carrying a heavy load or enter races in the Clydesdale class...

  8. #8
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    I am a commuter around Anchorage bowl, don't get to far away from my warm bed :-) I like the ride of the Pugs for winter commuting, I do have two wheelsets.

    My Pugs came with LM xc rims, and I have found these rims accept more tire sizes than I was aware when I started out,esp my Freddies, I call them my velcro tires for ice. I also have UMA 70's for the trails or when the plows haven't been out yet.

    If I commute on the Pugs during the summer I will try Maxxi Hookworms or similar, cheaper that wearing out my endo's .

  9. #9
    It aint gonna ride itself
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    I've done about half of my winter commutes on my 907 this year (the other half on my studded tire garage sale mountain bike.) We've had above-average snowfall this year, so the fattie was mostly ridden in the snow. Some days take me out on the lake and through the golf course...

    <iframe width='465' height='548' frameborder='0' src='https://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/70902900'></iframe>
    Here's what the lake looked like that day:

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mababo/5494051419/" title="Capitol Skyline by Mauricio Babilonia, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.static.flickr.com/5216/5494051419_082ce0432f.jpg" width="500" height="333" alt="Capitol Skyline" /></a>

  10. #10
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    I've done 30+ miles road / trail rides on the Pugs.
    And my 'commute' is usually a 12+ mile mix of bike path and trail in the morning before I get in front of the computer (working from home...)

  11. #11
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    Well I did it, it was a blast my commute is all city street's. Made the 12 miles in 55 min not bad for taking almost all winter off of biking but my first race is may 1st so I need to get seat time in. The Pugs is a absolute blast to ride in any condition I have ridden it in I thought I would be more outta shape but not bad LOL... I pumped my tire's up to about 17-18 psi BAD idea I will be dropping them down for the ride home...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by gomadtroll
    I am a commuter around Anchorage bowl, don't get to far away from my warm bed :-) I like the ride of the Pugs for winter commuting, I do have two wheelsets.

    My Pugs came with LM xc rims, and I have found these rims accept more tire sizes than I was aware when I started out,esp my Freddies, I call them my velcro tires for ice. I also have UMA 70's for the trails or when the plows haven't been out yet.

    If I commute on the Pugs during the summer I will try Maxxi Hookworms or similar, cheaper that wearing out my endo's .
    gomadtroll, would you mind posting photos of your various tires?

    I bought my Mukluk specifically to commute during snow events. My job involves municipal roadway snow removal. After a couple of decades of snow hating I thought it would put a bit more of a positive spin on the weather if I could at least bike to work. Now, nearly at the end of snow season, I am perplexed at being disappointed with our relatively mild winter. I did at least get to commute a few times on the Muk and thoroughly enjoyed it. I worry a bit about tire wear on the asphalt roads on my 13 mile round trip, though.

    An unanticipated result of riding my fat bike around my burg is the looks and comments from passersby. Kind of puts me in mind of being a small, fast moving circus.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeitlupe
    gomadtroll, would you mind posting photos of your various tires?
    Okay, I compete with cars on the streets so I am pretty conservative, studs and helmet, a hi-vis vest, lots of lights ( generator hubs on the 29er extreme & on the UMA 70) & conspicuity tape (reflective)

    I have the 100 front fork . I can run the 29er extreme from my Surly LHT on the front (currently), mostly because it has a generator hub.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Commuting-all3tires.jpg  

    Commuting-all3tires2.jpg  

    Commuting-bike3tires.jpg  

    Commuting-headshot.jpg  

    Commuting-extreme29er.jpg  


  14. #14
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    Wowser! That is an arsenal of tires. Thanks for showing.

  15. #15
    PUG U!!!
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    I've been pedaling to work on my Pugs for over a year now, and I couldn't be happier!!
    Although, I do have my Pugs lit up like a x-mas tree!!
    You wouldn't believe the looks I get at 4:30 a.m. Lol
    Better safe that a chalk outline on a city street!!

    Peace

  16. #16
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    Use it for what it is or baby it?

    So my fat bike is on order and I await it's arrival. I am also planning for for the winter's northshore fury and how to best keep my committment to year round commuting in Duluth MN. It is a 6 mile, 600 feet drop to work in the dark of the evening, a good climb home in the AM. Travel is mostly 2 and four lane town roads with some bike lanes. Right now my favorite ride to work is my Specialized tricross but as the cold rain and snow approach, I am making other plans.

    This was one of the reasons I sold myself on the Mukluk2 and how I rationalized the opening of my wallet in the LBS. However, since making the downpayment and all the anticipation of my new ride, I began to question whether I wanted to be putting my 2k transport through the adversity of duluth snow, rain, salt and grime. I started convincing myself to saving the beast for just the pristine trails and the white and blue of snow and ice of northern minnesota. Dreaming of the Arrowhead 135 etc....

    But it is a bike, right? Do you folks favor riding your fattie in the harshness of the urban commute in addition to the trails or do you let it be protected from the ill effects of winter road riding? I am starting to feel I should ride it in all conditions and do the best maintainence I can and savor it's utility. It is a tool for function. I would like to hear from other Fat bike commuters about their views.

    Cwolfe

  17. #17
    PUG U!!!
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    IMHO, use it for everything!!!
    Dont 2nd guess yourself!!
    You made the right call, and Enjoy the crap out of it!!!

    We here in the northland have winter trails coming out of our you know where!! Lol
    You'll chuckle at your self doubt come this winter!!!!

    Welcome to the FatBike cult!!!!!

    Peace..........

  18. #18
    It aint gonna ride itself
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    If you're going to commute by bike in Duluth, you should really check out Doug's blog. He's using a Cross Check and a Pugsley.

    Should you baby it? I think so. I'll ride my 907 once in a while (see above) but I've been using mostly garage sale bikes for winter commuting. It usually takes about a season to destroy a drivetrain, but that might be because Madison tends to use a lot of salt...even on the bike paths.

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mababo/2147403079/" title="Salted Rear Derailleur by Uncle Bicycle, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2190/2147403079_87ce1bff82_m.jpg" width="240" height="240" alt="Salted Rear Derailleur"></a>
    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mababo/2147402793/" title="Madison Brass Works by Uncle Bicycle, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2107/2147402793_5fdf8847bd_m.jpg" width="240" height="188" alt="Madison Brass Works"></a>

    The steel bike I've been using for 6 years might go another season or two before the frame is shot (pretty serious surface rust right now). YMMV, but the math is likely to be pretty simple.

  19. #19
    Slow But Still Pedaling
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    I commute on my Pugs most days - it's 4 miles each way and there is a dirt path running parallel to the pavement plus detours on to the beach if I have inclination (usually) and time (more often on the way home than there). A little slower but not enough to matter.

  20. #20
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    I commute on my Pugs all time time, even in summer! In the winter just keep up with maintenance. I store mine in the garage during the week (it doesnt thaw out in there), then bring it inside on the weekend to thaw out, get wiped down and relubed. Bike still looks new! Take care of it, and it'll take care of you.
    Jason
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  21. #21
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    Here's my setup for summer commuting with the pugs there awesome I love them. There Maxxis Hookworms!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Commuting-imag0086.jpg  

    Commuting-imag0087.jpg  

    Commuting-imag0088.jpg  


  22. #22
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    I just started working again after a 2 year hiatus from employment, and last week saw my first two bicycle commutes on my Pugsley. In the morning, I ride 1 mile to the lightrail train, and then off of the train itís roughly one mile to work. In the afternoon, I sprint balls-to-the-wall flat out on the Pugsley the entire way home:

    <iframe height='405' width='590' frameborder='0' allowtransparency='true' scrolling='no' src='http://app.strava.com/rides/1625721/embed/ea3b80be6f32d4781534f2fa3d5b86804119e63f'></iframe>

    Pugsley, 2x9 drivetrain (32t/22t FR x 11-34 RR), on 2.5" wide Surly Large Marge DH rims, shod with 26"x3.8" Nate up front, 26"x3.8" Larry (run in reverse) out back. Nice feeling to be able to keep up with the speeds/time of roadies, while riding my fat-tired snowbike.
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  23. #23
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    I have been riding my pugsley to work, 8 miles each way,mostly paved trails-I can have a nice little trail ride on the way home if I choose!
    I am going to try a Nate on the rear for traction when it finally gets snowy.

  24. #24
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    I have about 3 miles each way to work on fairly flat ground. All surface street with traffic. No issues on my Mukluk, either running Black Floyds or Larrys. One of these nights I'm going to ride the rail road tracks home for something different.

  25. #25
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    OK, I am now at serious risk of buying a fatbike. I have been winter commuting a couple years now on a regular 26'r, but my office here in VT got flooded out last month, so the route is changing. The new temporary (+/- 1yr) office is only 8 miles from my house by road. My house is on a hill and so is work, so it's the classic "when I was a kid we walked to school, uphill, both ways, in the snow" , 400' up to work, 600' home. But here's the fatbike part - I believe I can get there almost totally on snowmachine trails. I have done some of them before in winter by MTB, but it's only fun in the right conditions. So I am dreaming of a fatbike winter trail commute.

    I need to scope out the route, but here are the questions going through my mind...

    Can I do it? How long would it take? I don't have a feel for how much harder or will this be than my old commute. It was 15mi RT, dirt/paved roads, 1000' elevation gain homeward only. I am pretty tolerant time-wise, because on my old commute I also had to take the bus, so I'll save time there.

    This may sound wimpy, but I wonder if I will get spooked out on the trails in the dark? In the past on my road commute I've gone in late enough to have some daylight in the a.m., but it will definitely be dark after work. It's rural, mostly wooded, a few fields, but not wilderness.

    I guess I can get a feel for the answers by riding it on my existing bike before the snow flies, but I'd be interested in any input on how this would compare to using a fatbike on the same trails in winter, or any other thoughts that might push me over the edge or make me come to my senses.

    Also, keep in mind I am a 49yo woman, 135 lbs., in decent shape from bikecommuting/trailriding, and toughened up from a few winters of it, but not fast or really strong, I use a lot of granny. Geez, sorry for the novel if you made it this far.

  26. #26
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    Go for it.

    You can always change your mind in light of the experience of having tried it.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    OK, I am now at serious risk of buying a fatbike. I have been winter commuting a couple years now on a regular 26'r, but my office here in VT got flooded out last month, so the route is changing. The new temporary (+/- 1yr) office is only 8 miles from my house by road. My house is on a hill and so is work, so it's the classic "when I was a kid we walked to school, uphill, both ways, in the snow" , 400' up to work, 600' home. But here's the fatbike part - I believe I can get there almost totally on snowmachine trails. I have done some of them before in winter by MTB, but it's only fun in the right conditions. So I am dreaming of a fatbike winter trail commute.

    I need to scope out the route, but here are the questions going through my mind...

    Can I do it? How long would it take? I don't have a feel for how much harder or will this be than my old commute. It was 15mi RT, dirt/paved roads, 1000' elevationl gain homeward only. I am pretty tolerant time-wise, because on my old commute I also had to take the bus, so I'll save time there.

    This may sound wimpy, but I wonder if I will get spooked out on the trails in the dark? In the past on my road commute I've gone in late enough to have some daylight in the a.m., but it will definitely be dark after work. It's rural, mostly wooded, a few fields, but not wilderness.

    I guess I can get a feel for the answers by riding it on my existing bike before the snow flies, but I'd be interested in any input on how this would compare to using a fatbike on the same trails in winter, or any other thoughts that might push me over the edge or make me come to my senses.

    Also, keep in mind I am a 49yo woman, 135 lbs., in decent shape from bikecommuting/trailriding, and toughened up from a few winters of it, but not fast or really strong, I use a lot of granny. Geez, sorry for the novel if you made it this far.

    mtbxplorer, sorry to hear about the flood damage. We were lucky in BTV, so lots of water, but no damage. Friends that work in H20bury are out of offices, and a builder friend has been working non stop with clients cleaning up.

    I work from home, so my commute is to pick up my coffee and do a loop ride. Depending on snow conditions I can cover 6,8, or 12 miles. Time ranges are all over the map. But I don't have a packed snomo trail - I have whatever has been packed by walkers and skiers and myself. Once you get a good base you could be moving pretty quickly. And, you have an advantage - I sink into snow. Lighter is definitely better, and smooth spinning is rewarded with forward progress.

    My pugs is a ton of fun, snow season and not...

  28. #28
    Harmonius Wrench
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    @mtbxplorer: My commute is 5 miles (winter route) but very flat compared to yours, so take this into consideration as I explain here.

    I had a slow time of about an hour and the fastest I think I ever got it done was about 40 minutes. This was on snow 80% and the rest on typical winter time paved surfaces. Temps ranged from -10 to 10 above for that time period that I did that. (Had wheel trouble so I eventually went to a different bike until that got resolved.......in Summer!)

    Some of my route was busting my own path, which was slower at first, but as I compacted the snow over many passes, it got as fast as the cleared sections were.

    My thoughts would be to make sure you factor in the time to get geared up and back down again. I think it takes almost as much time to layer up, and get ready/return to civvies as it does to ride the route!

    Rural, or otherwise not trafficked routes are great ways to de-stress, but I would make sure your cell phone is charged and handy, just in case, as well. A breakdown or crash/injury in winter time can be a big problem.

    Otherwise, I'd definitely give it a shot. Sounds like a great way to get to work to me.
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  29. #29
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    Go for it MTB! I think you'll end up riding it all year round, and it makes for a killer bikepacking rig too. I highly recommend getting one before winter though, to let your body get used to the wider cranks and how it handles, that way when winter comes you'll be adjusted and ready for it.
    Jason
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  30. #30
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    xplorer!

    you already have your times to get geared figured out...and you are saying you will be have some extra time on this commute...I've never tried my pugs on snow, but I believe, from what I have heard here, that your snowmachine trails will be perfect for the job...do you have your times for the same route on your actual mtb? I don't think it will change a lot with the proper flotation on winter

    you have the advantage in the weight department..with a stock pugs (65mm rims) you will be having a lot of flotation already...are you going to build?...put some 80 mm rims and you will be riding over clouds!

    stock bike or not...I would use a rear Nate tire...my rear larry slips a lot in hard terrain...your are going to be climbing so...

    ...go for it!

    I can only wish for a proper fatbike commute

  31. #31
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    Thanks all, for your input and potentially checkbook-draining encoruagement. I scoped out the trails today on the MTB, and it is dangerously do-able. Actually shorter than the road, 7mi +/-, about 90 mins each way. I had a few detours hunting down the snow-mo trail in the fall. One section was still elusive, I know I have done it before in winter, but it enters the woods somewhere on the far side of a big farm & I was reluctant to wander through their pasture, but there is a dirt road alternative anyway. On the way back I though I found the other end of it, but after travelling a beautiful unmarked trail & being in sight of the barn, the trail ended up circling back where I started after 1 mi. The 2nd half of the ride traverses Millstone trails territory (60mi of MTB trails around old quarries), so there are also singletrack options until the snow flies. Some hills will be tough, probably some pushing in snow, but hopefully not too far.

    Another thought is to ride in on trails, and home on the road. How are they on what I call "ice pavement", dirt roads that ares smoothest in winter because the plows and traffic pack it down to ice? I use studs now -well not "now, now" - on my skinnyMTB and really need them on the hills.

    Leaning toward a Fatback Alu if I can get one, seems like it would have better standover for the height challenged (5'3") - thoughts?

    If I can't get home, maybe I can borrow this quarry machine, parked behind the office. A couple pics from the route too.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Commuting-res-view.jpg  

    Commuting-rockwall.jpg  

    Attached Images Attached Images  

  32. #32
    It aint gonna ride itself
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    OK, I am now at serious risk of buying a fatbike. I have been winter commuting a couple years now on a regular 26'r, but my office here in VT got flooded out last month, so the route is changing. The new temporary (+/- 1yr) office is only 8 miles from my house by road. My house is on a hill and so is work, so it's the classic "when I was a kid we walked to school, uphill, both ways, in the snow" , 400' up to work, 600' home. But here's the fatbike part - I believe I can get there almost totally on snowmachine trails. I have done some of them before in winter by MTB, but it's only fun in the right conditions. So I am dreaming of a fatbike winter trail commute.

    I need to scope out the route, but here are the questions going through my mind...

    Can I do it? How long would it take? I don't have a feel for how much harder or will this be than my old commute. It was 15mi RT, dirt/paved roads, 1000' elevation gain homeward only. I am pretty tolerant time-wise, because on my old commute I also had to take the bus, so I'll save time there.

    This may sound wimpy, but I wonder if I will get spooked out on the trails in the dark? In the past on my road commute I've gone in late enough to have some daylight in the a.m., but it will definitely be dark after work. It's rural, mostly wooded, a few fields, but not wilderness.

    I guess I can get a feel for the answers by riding it on my existing bike before the snow flies, but I'd be interested in any input on how this would compare to using a fatbike on the same trails in winter, or any other thoughts that might push me over the edge or make me come to my senses.

    Also, keep in mind I am a 49yo woman, 135 lbs., in decent shape from bikecommuting/trailriding, and toughened up from a few winters of it, but not fast or really strong, I use a lot of granny. Geez, sorry for the novel if you made it this far.
    Given enough time, you can do anything you want. I think in this case, it probably wouldn't hurt to reach out to the local snowmo club if such a thing exists. Offering to buy a membership, or at the very least just introducing yourself would likely do wonders.

    As for the other questions, I'll offer some answers you probably already know: Yes you can do it, but how long it takes varies with conditions. Figure probably 5-12 mph average speed; slower on soft or fresh snow and faster on hardpack. You'll find that freshly churned snowmo tracks take time to set up even when it's cold, and can get soft as temps rise above 25˚f. A fat bike will definitely allow you to enjoy a wider range of conditions. It's pretty amazing, really

    Yes, solo trips in the dark in a rural area can be spooky. Good lights and cell phone reception are obvious, but good relations with fellow trail users and area land owners couldn't hurt either. Whenever possible, keep people informed of where you are and when you might arrive.

    Here's part of my optional commute just after a storm (plowed only, no salt):

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mababo/4180660292/" title="Winter Bike Wonderland by Uncle Bicycle, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2539/4180660292_6178a75783.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="Winter Bike Wonderland"></a>

    And riding on a soft snowmobile trail:

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mababo/5304220782/" title="Military Ridge Trail by Uncle Bicycle, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.static.flickr.com/5202/5304220782_b3c5c3853c.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="Military Ridge Trail"></a>

    Good luck!

  33. #33
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    Thanks, Mauricio, for your info & ideas, that looks like a great commute. Yes the route here straddles 2 local snowmo clubs (the Sno-bees & the Thunder Chickens (huh ?!?!?)). Officially bikes are not "authorized" for travel on the trails, meaning they didn't ask landowners for permission for MTBs, but in reality few landowners are concerned about bikes if they are letting snowmobiles through. Whether biking, xc skiing, or dog walking, I typically step aside, wait & wave when they come through, as a courtesy & for safety. They wave back. All good, though I haven't tried this in the dark. Luckily, it's not real busy, even on the weekends.

    You can't get an actual trail pass without a sled registration #, but I could send $ for a new map & donation for trail maintenance. They have a big groomer that goes through (on the bigger numbered routes) maybe once a week and compacts the trail smooth. In between, it can get churned up, esp on the hills.

    Since I live alone I already text a friend upon arrival, it definitely feels better knowing someone else would be aware of it if I don't arrive when due.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Thanks, Mauricio, for your info & ideas, that looks like a great commute. Yes the route here straddles 2 local snowmo clubs (the Sno-bees & the Thunder Chickens (huh ?!?!?)). Officially bikes are not "authorized" for travel on the trails, meaning they didn't ask landowners for permission for MTBs, but in reality few landowners are concerned about bikes if they are letting snowmobiles through. Whether biking, xc skiing, or dog walking, I typically step aside, wait & wave when they come through, as a courtesy & for safety. They wave back. All good, though I haven't tried this in the dark. Luckily, it's not real busy, even on the weekends.

    You can't get an actual trail pass without a sled registration #, but I could send $ for a new map & donation for trail maintenance. They have a big groomer that goes through (on the bigger numbered routes) maybe once a week and compacts the trail smooth. In between, it can get churned up, esp on the hills.

    Since I live alone I already text a friend upon arrival, it definitely feels better knowing someone else would be aware of it if I don't arrive when due.
    That ride will be less scary in the winter, because it will be lot brighter. A good headlight on white snow reflects a surprising amount of light. Itís quite surreal, like riding in a scene from a Christmas card. There wonít be as many animals either, mostly just birds and hares. If there are any bears or cougars in the area itís always good to know whatís going on with them, especially if you ride alone, however. Your chances of an encounter are extremely small, but itís always good to be informed.

  35. #35
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    And always have a Plan B in case of a mechanical (or worse).
    Let the market decide!

    N42.58 W83.06

  36. #36
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    Thunder Chickens! That's a fantastic name!

    Yeah, I can't get a trail pass either, which is no big deal since I don't really need access to the private trails. But the mere asking for it seemed to foster some goodwill. I so far have found that the courtesy of yielding to sleds on the public trails goes a long way. With fat biking gets more popular, we'll have to see how long the harmony lasts.

    All that said, I don't ride the snomo trails here after dark when they're officially open. There's just too much combined drinking and sledding in Wisco.

    The organizer of the Triple D race (the one down in Iowa that I've done a couple times) works with the local club (Asbury Snow Hawks) to the extent that private trails comprise about 20 percent of the course. They are a blast...lots of winding, off-camber stuff, huge, steep climbs and descents...all of it very ridable but for the climbs.

    With regard to landowners, I suspect most of them are more concerned about motorized traffic and hunters than with the likes of us. Not sure winter bikes are even on their radar.

    As BowHopper points out, it does tend to be brighter in the snow, especially if you're under the light dome of a nearby urban area. It's pretty amazing how bright it can be at night during a snowfall. Still, it's hard to beat the current crop of LED headlights, and I would also put in a plug for the new Planet Bike Superflash Turbo taillight...

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Leaning toward a Fatback Alu if I can get one, seems like it would have better standover for the height challenged (5'3") - thoughts?
    My wife is 5'1" and the smallest Fatback Aluminum just fits, so you should be good to go. I was in Speedway yesterday and they have quite a few frames in there right now. Good Luck

  38. #38
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    Now I've done it!

    Took the plunge & put $ down on the last 14" green 2011 Fatback frame. Should arrive in just a few weeks with the carbon fork & wheels!

    Thanks all, I will keep that "Christmas Card" image from Bowhopper in mind if I get scared of the dark on the trail. Uta, with regards to plan B, please send your phone #. I'll probably add a handlebar light, better backup anyways, and I have a crazy bright Dinotte tailight.

    "Rollin', rollin', rollin' " - I think that is my bag of cash he's riding away with in the first 15 seconds! Yee hah!
    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ShOiHPrwtHk?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

  39. #39
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    Congrats!!!!! Can't wait to read about all those "how was your commute posts"

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Took the plunge & put $ down on the last 14" green 2011 Fatback frame. Should arrive in just a few weeks with the carbon fork & wheels!

    Thanks all, I will keep that "Christmas Card" image from Bowhopper in mind if I get scared of the dark on the trail. Uta, with regards to plan B, please send your phone #. I'll probably add a handlebar light, better backup anyways, and I have a crazy bright Dinotte tailight.

    "Rollin', rollin', rollin' " - I think that is my bag of cash he's riding away with in the first 15 seconds! Yee hah!
    Congrats on the purchase! I got my Fatback last April and am looking forward to getting it out on the snow.

    Women always have some safety concerns that men don't have (friend of mine recently wrote about his mixed feelings of pride and worry as his daughter commutes on trails in the dark) and it's a pisser. You've gotten some great advice from everyone: make yourself known, know your surroundings, have someone waiting for your call, and invest in some great lights (I use Dinotte as well -- great lights!). One more: plug into your local cycling discussion board(s) and scan it regularly to keep yourself aware of any issues/crime that may be arising on area trails (you also might discover others who commute the same trails you're considering). And yes, the night is brighter with snow on the ground!

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bag View Post
    Congrats on the purchase! I got my Fatback last April and am looking forward to getting it out on the snow.

    Thanks! Enjoy your Fatback & winter as well!

    Women always have some safety concerns that men don't have (friend of mine recently wrote about his mixed feelings of pride and worry as his daughter commutes on trails in the dark) and it's a pisser.

    Sad but true. I learned this in 6th grade when I had borrowed my sister's new 10-speed and a boy-gang on bikes chased me & tried to take it away, put sticks in the spokes etc. I was able to sprint away, no doubt motivated by it being my sister's bike, but I still remember one of them saying "We don't want you, just the bike". Until then, the thought had not occurred to me that they might want something other than the bike.


    You've gotten some great advice from everyone: make yourself known, know your surroundings, have someone waiting for your call, and invest in some great lights (I use Dinotte as well -- great lights!). One more: plug into your local cycling discussion board(s) and scan it regularly to keep yourself aware of any issues/crime that may be arising on area trails (you also might discover others who commute the same trails you're considering). And yes, the night is brighter with snow on the ground!
    That's an excellent suggestion. While it is pretty safe here, I first heard of a crime a couple weeks ago on the trails 1.5 hrs south through the local forum; a h.s. girl showed up early for a running meet to warm up annd was attacked on the trail, and came out of the woods bleeding and crying. A MTB'r and his wife arrived for a ride and were greeted by the police cars, and then alerted others through the forum.

    However, I would be pretty shocked to see another biker on these trails. Even on my road commute, if i saw a couple other cyclists it was a lot. Recreational MTB'g and roadbiking are pretty big here, but there are not a lot of commuters or winter bikers.

    p.s. Thanks to everyone who has been so welcoming and encouraging here. So nice to get positive energy.

  42. #42
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    Hey Justin51! How well do the Hookworms roll? I am debating on a set but am at a crossroads because I think the Black Floyds are wicked cool. I've read that you can pump them too high for fear of bead slippage or tire blowout, have you had any of those concerns or is it a relatively worry free tire? They look pretty cool on the pugsley as well!

    Thanks buddy!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    [COLOR="royalblue"]However, I would be pretty shocked to see another biker on these trails. Even on my road commute, if i saw a couple other cyclists it was a lot. Recreational MTB'g and roadbiking are pretty big here, but there are not a lot of commuters or winter bikers.
    Sounds like you'll be starting a new trend!

  44. #44
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    Update: Rode the trails both ways on the MTB today, it was superb! Light on the way in, got dark about halfway home & I didn't get scared of the dark! Add some cold and wind and it could be different, but I am encouraged. I had to walk up a couple steep sections, but I'm not gonna lose any sleep over that. Saw 10 turkeys and 6 deer today. Zero bikes, zero hunters sighted, but was glad to be in orange/flourescent green as I saw 3 moose on trailers over the weekend. The commute took about 1 1/4 hr each way. The Fatback "rolling chassis" will be en route when the wheels are built this week.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    [...] I saw 3 moose on trailers over the weekend.
    Right, so do you need to take any precautions to avoid tangling with the moose themselves? We don't have them in Wisco, so I'm mainly just curious...

  46. #46
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    Not really, they are much more dangerous when you are driving as they tend to come through the windshield. On a bike or on foot they usually ignore you and keep munching or whatever. I've heard of people getting hurt trying to pet the cute moosey, or getting close for a photo, but most people are smarter than that. I don't see them very often here, though.

  47. #47
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    Ya, lots of Moose in AK, just like mtbx said, in a car, they suck, on a bike, you can just go around them or wait for them to walk off the trail.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by justin51 View Post
    Here's my setup for summer commuting with the pugs there awesome I love them. There Maxxis Hookworms!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Nice pics.

    I wonder how these tires compare to the Black Floyds on summer commutes?

  49. #49
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    Has anyone been commuting with drilled out rims on concrete? What are the drawbacks to the sturdiness of the rim for this type of riding? I've been commuting 3 times a week about 5 miles and don't want to damage anything but also don't want to pony up another 400$ for a wheelset.

    For the record my LBS said that they have had zero issues with cut outs on concrete. Does anyone else have any experience with this?

  50. #50
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    I commute 26 miles round trip on my Mukluk with the Black Floyds. Tire pressure up at 25psi. So far so good!

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by christian402 View Post
    Has anyone been commuting with drilled out rims on concrete? What are the drawbacks to the sturdiness of the rim for this type of riding? I've been commuting 3 times a week about 5 miles and don't want to damage anything but also don't want to pony up another 400$ for a wheelset.

    For the record my LBS said that they have had zero issues with cut outs on concrete. Does anyone else have any experience with this?
    Yes daily and no problems!!

  52. #52
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    Oh the Irony

    Drove 45 miles to Fedex today to pick up my new Fatback frame, fork & wheels. About 1/4 mi away from Fedex, the car made a weird noise and died. Decided to walk for my packages before calling for a tow. A good samaritan there offered me and my 2 big packages a ride back to my car - it would have been 2 long walks with packages back and forth otherwise. So the towtruck came and luckily I was covered for 100 mi tow and that got me back to a garage about 4 mi from my house. There I had to leave the Fatback stuff in the car, but took out my regular MTB to get home without walking. Some packing tape to keep the pants out of the chain and I was good to go. Hoping to borrow a neighbor's car or get a lift later so I can bring the Fatback home.

  53. #53
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    2nd day commuting on the new Fatback, mostly via snowmobile trails. Tonight the 6 miles only took about 15 minutes longer than a typical dry trail commute on the regular MTB.
    Thanks again for your input!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Commuting-pc131379.jpg  


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