Christini Technologies Fat Bike- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Christini Technologies Fat Bike

    Just wondering if any of these bikes have actually been sold and if so what owners think of them.

    I looked at the thread talking about Kate Leeming's planned expedition to the South Pole using one. It seems most people were skeptical about the 2WD bike.

    My opinion: Bad choice for Antarctica. It seems to me that the Bud and Lou tires with very low pressure provided the traction needed in most cases. When it was not enough the amount of effort needed was beyond what was sustainable so I don't think 2WD really adds a needed benefit. On the other hand, it has to add extra drag to the system, make the bike heavier and anything mechanical has a great chance of failing in Antarctica.

  2. #2
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    Looks like I'm coming to this thread 1 year later...lol..

    I agree with you. For an Expedition like that...way to many things can go wrong no even considering the AWD itself.

    Adding my 2 cents here on the tech but for everyday use, I'm all about it! Never tried a Christini bike before but I am digging the internet lately looking for feedback's and the more I read, the more I want to try it!

    It can be a very inspiring project...since I am a bit of a weight weenie, this bike isn't at all what I look for in therms of weight, 29 to 30lbs bike for the stock XC version....but I believe I could build from ground up with some light parts and shave a decent 5lbs...so a 25lbs All wheel Drive Full Suspension XC bike sound like music to my ears...since I absolutely love climbs.

    Reading the reviews, that's what everybody is saying.. also great for uphills other than a bunch of other conditions! this bike sounds like a dream!
    Christini AWD XC XC Full Suspension Reviews - Mtbr.com

  3. #3
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    I could definitely see use for an electric bike. I'm surprised to see so many good reviews for regular pedaling though, definitely interesting, bit too much going on for my taste.

  4. #4
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    ?... why are you saying electric bike? we are discussing 2x2 All Wheel Drive mechanical system created by Steve Christini. Christini AWD

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    Let me reword that, I can see a use for this AWD system in use with an electric bike. Extra cranking power would really make use of the AWD system. For a regular pedal bike, I don't really understand what it would help with. Ice, Slippery mud, possibly snow. I suppose if that's where it helps, this system on a fat bike would have merit. I've never used it before though, so it's only speculation on my own riding habits. I would certainly be up for giving it a shot though, could be nice.

  6. #6
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    Christini Technologies Fat Bike

    Quote Originally Posted by wreckster View Post
    Let me reword that, I can see a use for this AWD system in use with an electric bike. Extra cranking power would really make use of the AWD system. For a regular pedal bike, I don't really understand what it would help with. Ice, Slippery mud, possibly snow. I suppose if that's where it helps, this system on a fat bike would have merit. I've never used it before though, so it's only speculation on my own riding habits. I would certainly be up for giving it a shot though, could be nice.
    Got it! Combining that with a electric motor...that's...well, a AWD motorcycle!

    Reading a bunch of reviews...everyone swears for it. Looks like the system really helps for all kinds of situations, also safer on tricky descents where a front wheel would go off the line, the AWD assures traction all the time...just like an Audi Quattro.

    The only false expectation I see is that everyone is also saying that climbs well with the 'front pull' assisting the job....but with a 30lbs bike, I'd say that this advantage is actually being canceled by the extra weight....like I said...if someone puts some weight weenie efforts to the build to shave some weigh...I can start believing in the real benefit of the AWD for uphills.

    No way a 30lbs bike would climb better than my 20lbs rig!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrepsz View Post
    Reading a bunch of reviews...everyone swears for it. Looks like the system really helps for all kinds of situations, also safer on tricky descents where a front wheel would go off the line, the AWD assures traction all the time...just like an Audi Quattro.
    Except that is wrong.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Except that is wrong.
    Have you ridden one?
    leelikesbikes.com - Christini AWD Bike

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrepsz View Post
    When descending you'll be free wheeling anyway, so there will be no benefit to the traction.

  10. #10
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    you can turn on and off...that's what they are saying. Have you tried one?

  11. #11
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    For what it's worth, Christini is in my neighborhood.
    Last edited by Gigantic; 02-13-2016 at 06:20 AM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrepsz View Post
    Audi quattro, and any other AWD system, only helps when starting out/accelerating or climbing and will not benefit you while descending. The only possible benefit, equalized engine braking while descending, wouldn't apply here at all. It's a common misconception that AWD helps out "everywhere". It can be pretty critical in certain places like here, where you can get layers of ice on the roads for months (ice, not snow), but that is for starting and accelerating, slowing down is a function of tires and brakes.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrepsz View Post
    you can turn on and off...that's what they are saying. Have you tried one?
    See Jayems answer below.

  14. #14
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    I think its important to associate with your answers if you have ridden one or not.
    Last edited by andrepsz; 02-12-2016 at 01:24 PM.

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    Christini Technologies Fat Bike-28fb581c26566bac2a2cad0644dec067-fat-woman-bike.jpg
    Haven't ridden one and not planning on it. To each his own.

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    A friend had one a decade or so ago. He thought that the front drive system had a pretty hefty friction penalty.

    This seems like a solution looking for a problem - lack of traction is rarely the problem IMO. Lack of lungs, lack of balance, too much speed and soft shoulders cause about 99% of my dabs/dismounts. Which is to say, lack of traction is the least of my problems.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by tfinator View Post
    When descending you'll be free wheeling anyway, so there will be no benefit to the traction.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Audi quattro, and any other AWD system, only helps when starting out/accelerating or climbing and will not benefit you while descending. The only possible benefit, equalized engine braking while descending, wouldn't apply here at all. It's a common misconception that AWD helps out "everywhere". It can be pretty critical in certain places like here, where you can get layers of ice on the roads for months (ice, not snow), but that is for starting and accelerating, slowing down is a function of tires and brakes.
    The Christini AWD, when engaged, slightly under drives the front wheel from the rear wheel, whether you are pedalling or not. That means, any time the front wheel turns slower than the rear, the power gets transferred to the front wheel. It means that when the front wheel washes out, it gets driven by the rear wheel, which does happen on a downhill.

    In practice, I usually leave the AWD disengaged on downhills due to the added drag.
    Last edited by itsdoable; 02-12-2016 at 08:38 PM.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsdoable View Post
    In practice, I usually leave the AWD disengaged on downhills due to the added drag.

    Here it is, we finally have a user of the bike...feel free to give us more feedback! I'm curious!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrepsz View Post
    Here it is, we finally have a user of the bike...feel free to give us more feedback! I'm curious!
    I have the original Hardtail, posted some observation back in 2004 - it took me a while to search it out, had to go into the MTBR archives to find it.

    This is the original thread (go to the last post): Mountain Bike Review Forum Archives

    Some followup (just look for my posts in the threads)

    (2004) http://forums.mtbr.com/general-discu...mtbs-3933.html
    (2006) http://forums.mtbr.com/general-discu...ke-243730.html

    I still have it, but I don't ride it much. The main problem was, when the bike was in it's element, everyone else was walking. When everyone else was on the flat smooth hard stuff, you were working hard to keep up. Kind of like Fat Bikes when they first came out, only they caught on (the technology and maintenance is much simpler), so you can find people to ride with.

  20. #20
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    Very cool, I just checked your comments on the first link...and it does match with all the rest of the comments that I found elsewhere. I think I have a special interest for this kind of bike because my number one destination here next to my house is as nasty as it gets....rocky as F* and is one way up, steep..and same way down...on the same nasty rocks.

    As for your analogy with Fatbikes...it makes sense. I really believe this AWD concept could be revamped, on a nice and light carbon fiber frame, light parts, Titanium components, better material all around and this bike would have a place just like Fat bikes today are here to stay. I can imagine this bike under 25lbs and killing it!

    One thing I'm trying to understand...you said that when everybody was on flat smooth...you were working harder to keep up...but can't you just switch the AWD entirely off? some other people where saying that when its off it feels just like any other bike.
    Last edited by andrepsz; 02-12-2016 at 11:37 PM.

  21. #21
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    Christini Technologies Fat Bike

    I want to try one
    Last edited by andrepsz; 02-14-2016 at 09:45 AM.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrepsz View Post
    One thing I'm trying to understand...you said that when everybody was on flat smooth...you were working harder to keep up...but can't you just switch the AWD entirely off? some other people where saying that when its off it feels just like any other bike.
    My 15 year old bike is getting off topic in this forum...

    But just like riding a Fat Bike with a group of light XC bikes on fast dry trails, you work harder to keep up. You have to remember that back in 2004, a large part of the group were riding XC race bikes. All Mountain was not a term yet and 4"s of travel was for downhill. I was lucky to ride with a bunch of freaks that broke all the rules (but we still made fun of each other).

    Many of them have Fat Bikes now, none of them have an AWD. And "2" is the critical number you need to have fun.

  23. #23
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    As far as riding on snow goes:

    I could see it being a significant benefit when the trail gets really crappy. Soft, punchy, chopped up, mashed potato kind of snow. If a big chunk of your mileage is that kind of stuff, it might be a big benefit. Would have to be pretty light and low resistance though. Maybe an add on that could be installed without too much hassle for a race/ride or during/after a big snowstorm.

  24. #24
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    Although I can see that 2wd drive has some benefits, I'm sceptical about the claims it helps with climbing.

    The front drive does not benefit from weight transfer going up a steep hill, and if the surface is loose or soft, is quite likely to spin. I have ridden a front-drive assisted e-bike in those conditions and came to the conclusion that the front wasn't much help at all. I suspect having to propel the extra weight of a 2wd system would negate the value of any drive.

    On the flat, a different story.

    Edit: just to make it clear - my opinion is theoretical based on other experiences of front wheel traction up steep loose hills.
    I haven't ridden a Christini, but would very much like to try one.
    Last edited by Velobike; 02-15-2016 at 04:21 PM.
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