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  1. #1
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    Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike

    Took a chance and bought a suspension fork from China via eBay for my fat bike. Surprisingly, it fit my bike very well and plenty of clearance for a 26x4 tire.


    My fat bike is a Framed Minnesota 2.0 with a 1 1/8 straight steerer tube and 135mm front hub spacing.


    The shock is similar to the cheap spring shocks with oil for damping. It has a lockout, preload adjustment and 100mm of travel. Very plush and good damping; not bad for a $115 fork.

    This thing is heavy though. Not sure how much it weighs because I didnt weigh it prior to installing it. The lower arms and upper arms are made of steel; I was surprised my magnets stick to the legs.


    I'm pretty sure I'm not going to be setting any Strava records with this fork but it will have to do until they start making aluminum suspension forks for fat bikes with 1 1/8 straight steerer tubes.

    Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike-rsz_20150217_160828.jpgCheap suspension fork for my fat bike-rsz_20150217_160836.jpgCheap suspension fork for my fat bike-rsz_20150217_160848.jpg



  2. #2
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    Shipping label says it's 3.5 kgs which is about 7.8 lbs

  3. #3
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    Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike

    Is there a place online I can see the specs for this fork?? I'm kinda interested. Thanks.


    My Bikes--2014 Trek Fuel 8-29er, 2014 Trek Crossrip Elite, 2015 Trek Farley 6.

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    http://www.ebay.com/itm/251829139856...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

    Can't say how well it performs on the trail because I just installed it.

    It added a lot of weight to the front end.

  5. #5
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    RST will be bringing out an affordable suspension for with a straight steerer in the next month or so. they're said to weigh about 5 pounds.

    https://www.facebook.com/RSTSuspensi...type=1&theater

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    Here are my first impressions / observations:

    -Nice fit
    -Lots of travel for a cheap fork.
    -Lock out
    -Preload adjustment - didn't feel much difference changing the preload
    -Stancions are steel
    -Casting / lower legs are steel
    -Arch is steel
    -Shock tops out when I lift the front wheel off the ground with a loud clunk
    -Front end feels really heavy ~ 8 lbs shock and fat tire combo is a lot of weight. Makes it harder to pull the front wheel off the ground.
    -Spring is a tad on the soft side; easier to compress than my Rockshox Reba fork on my 29er.

  7. #7
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    RST fork

    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    RST will be bringing out an affordable suspension for with a straight steerer in the next month or so. they're said to weigh about 5 pounds.

    https://www.facebook.com/RSTSuspensi...type=1&theater
    The RST is affordable only if you have deep pockets. It is reported to be in the 500 plus price range. I was excited when i first saw info about it, because that was exactly how it was described...affordable. Some of us looking for suspension don't find 500 plus affordable. Don't expect this cheap fork to be as good as a bluto or RST, but is a hundred bucks, not north of 500

  8. #8
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    Nice. Following to see where this goes.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve1324 View Post
    The RST is affordable only if you have deep pockets. It is reported to be in the 500 plus price range. I was excited when i first saw info about it, because that was exactly how it was described...affordable. Some of us looking for suspension don't find 500 plus affordable. Don't expect this cheap fork to be as good as a bluto or RST, but is a hundred bucks, not north of 500
    um... no. The RST is cheap, about $300 or more less than the leading products available and is more than affordable. At around $2,000, the Rockshox RS-1 is a product for those with deep pockets and ways out of my freelance writer's budget. https://www.sram.com/rockshox/products/rs-1

    From a performance stand point, the OP could have gotten a pogo stick, bolted a wheel to it and called it a "Lefty" and would have been quite a bit lighter, to boot. The RST, while somewhat heavy and not offering the performance of a Bluto or lefty, will provide a modicum of adjustability, damping and serviceability. I expect that the unbranded chinese fork will be not much better that the forks that come on Walmart bikes; heaven forbid that you don't fit the stock spring rate or need service, you'l be sol.

  10. #10
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    I only paid $535 for my Bluto. Not sure I will ever buy another RST fork after my last one, but it will be nice to have options. :-)

    My RST I had (2013 model) was as flexy as a wet noodle.

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    500 plus price range is "you can afford a Bluto", so is the RST gonna be similar in performance? If not... Bluto. Or Lefty.

    What price is the " fork of many names" fetching these days?

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    Re: Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike

    Looking at this generic front shock from china, it's not much different from a 29er shock. It has a wider crown and arch to fit a four inch tire. Everything else looks like the could have used parts from a 29er shock so I'm not sure why it's taking so long for manufacturers to start fabricating affordable front suspensions for fat bikes with 1 1/8 steerer tubes.

  13. #13
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    My buddy ordered one of these today from Aliexpress. He got the 120mm version. Hard to say if he will be happy with it, but he got it for $105, so its worth the risk...

    Ill report back once he gets it...

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    I took the shock apart to see how it's built. I couldn't figure out to get the lower arms/casting off because it doesn't have a nut. The shock has a spring and what looks like a mechanical lock out. The shock has plenty of travel but it doesn't have any damping that I could see and the braking forces keep moving my wheel off center. The shock tops out with a clunk when lifting the front wheel off the ground. I weighed it and it weighs 6.5 lbs.

    Save your money for a real shock.

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    I think someone said they bought a Bluto for $300 from bikes direct.

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    I think the reason we won't see too many 1 1/8 is not because they don't work, but because the industry is moving toward the tapered head tubes, so the forks have to do the same. This is the reason no one sells an 8 spd any more. The bigger issue is the axle. With hubs that wide and the stress from the extra weight and rolling resistance of big tires, the QRs are not stiff enough to keep the forks from flexing. That's why you are only seeing thru axles on the better forks.
    On heavy rotation: Stooge 27.5+ SS, On-One Fatty, On-One 456 EVO, Surly Cross-Check, Scott CR1 (SS road)

  17. #17
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    Good to know. I wonder why your wheel moves under braking. I've never heard of that.

    Worst case when he gets it, if it's terrible, it will end up on one of his boys Dolomites.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTBLoCo29 View Post
    I think the reason we won't see too many 1 1/8 is not because they don't work, but because the industry is moving toward the tapered head tubes, so the forks have to do the same. This is the reason no one sells an 8 spd any more. The bigger issue is the axle. With hubs that wide and the stress from the extra weight and rolling resistance of big tires, the QRs are not stiff enough to keep the forks from flexing. That's why you are only seeing thru axles on the better forks.
    Torsional flex (what the thru axle is for) isn't that big of a deal on such a low travel fork, but it's far more efficient to make a 1.5 tapered steerer fork for the fore-aft stiffness so the thing won't bind when it hits a rock and so the frame won't ovalize (problem in the 90s and early 2000s when forks started getting bigger). Remember your fatbike or 29er fork has a much longer axle to crown than an old Judy or Sid from the 90s, which makes the tapered steerer a good solution to cut down on fore-aft flex. I'd rather have both the thru-axle and the tapered steerer, it's simply a better way to make a fork and allows the frame to better deal with the forces by spreading them out over a bigger area.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by linklight View Post
    I took the shock apart to see how it's built. I couldn't figure out to get the lower arms/casting off because it doesn't have a nut. The shock has a spring and what looks like a mechanical lock out. The shock has plenty of travel but it doesn't have any damping that I could see and the braking forces keep moving my wheel off center. The shock tops out with a clunk when lifting the front wheel off the ground. I weighed it and it weighs 6.5 lbs.

    Save your money for a real shock.
    The lowers are probably threaded at the base just like the cheapest of the cheap XCT fork. Some suntour XCT forks are ok, some are straight up boat anchors. Sounds like this is closer to the boat anchor, but I'd still try it out. Just not at $100. Another year, and they'll be $50 on ebay.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I'd rather have both the thru-axle and the tapered steerer, it's simply a better way to make a fork and allows the frame to better deal with the forces by spreading them out over a bigger area.
    I'm tempted to to buy another fat bike with a head tube that can fit a tapered fork but I have 7 bikes already and I don't need another one so the search to find a straight steerer suspension fork for my fat bike continues.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blown240 View Post
    Good to know. I wonder why your wheel moves under braking. I've never heard of that.

    Worst case when he gets it, if it's terrible, it will end up on one of his boys Dolomites.
    I have hydraulic disc brakes on my fat bike. The good news is that the brakes work really well. The bad news is that the wheel moves slightly toward the caliper under hard braking; I'm guessing it's because the shock is flexing and/or I need to get better QRs.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by linklight View Post
    The shock has a spring and what looks like a mechanical lock out. The shock has plenty of travel but it doesn't have any damping that I could see and the braking forces keep moving my wheel off center.
    This may be a REALLY stupid idea, but what about adding some sort of damper? The first thing that pops into my mind is what is used to keep a screen door from slamming....

  23. #23
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    Maybe you can DIY something like this...

    Lauf Carbonara | Lauf Forks - The Lauf Carbonara

    Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike-laufcarbonara_parallax.jpg

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by blown240 View Post
    This may be a REALLY stupid idea, but what about adding some sort of damper? The first thing that pops into my mind is what is used to keep a screen door from slamming....
    I like tinkering and if I could improve this shock, I would but couldn't figure out how to remove the lowers arms from the stancion. It has screws on the bottom of the arms that are visible but no nut around the screw. The spring and the lock out contraption comes out via the top pretty easily.

    I could live without damping because friction does a pretty good job of damping the shock; it doesn't bounce like a pogo stick but I don't like the clunk sound when the shock tops out because the wheel is off the ground.

  25. #25
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    It definately has the screws like the cheap XCT fork. You have to get an extension on a socket wrench and hex key. the nut is only accessible from inside the stanchions from the top. Much weaker design than a external nut. Not sure how it's cheaper either considering the alternative is simply putting a nut on the bottom. Maybe it takes an extra 15 seconds in labor. I've tried to upgrade a cheap 26" RST fork I had with adding springs to the bottom for a litle bottom out buffer. It works, but not great. the problem with it is for it to work, you're negating the spring rate from the top. to have any effect against bottoming out, this makes the top spring have to be twice as strong to still get the same suspension, which will probably bust the cap off these stanchions. Better luck using a dense foam between the stanchions and lowers, or accept the fact you're making noise.

    Are there springs in each stanchion, or just one with a cheap "lockout" in the other. If this is anything like the suntour mechanical lockout, I'd bet it breaks within the first couple months. Better to take it out and set up a spring on that side.

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    Re: Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike

    It only has a spring in one side. The other side has the lockout.

    I flipped the QR so that the aluminum lever and metal bushing is on the right side opposite the caliper so the wheel is staying centered now under heavy braking. The other side of the QR is plastic with a thin metal shim. It's probably better this way because most of the forces under braking that is trying to rip the wheel out the dropouts is on the right side.

    When I have some more time, i will take apart the shock again and see if I can remove the lower arms.

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    Re: Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike

    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    It definately has the screws like the cheap XCT fork. You have to get an extension on a socket wrench and hex key. the nut is only accessible from inside the stanchions from the top.

    You were correct, the nut come out through the stanchions from the top. I was able to take apart the shock.

    It has two spings; one in each stanchion. The sping in the right stanchion is shorter. It also has a mechanical lockout that sits above the right spring hence why i originally thought it only had one spring because i didnt pull the lock out contraption out of the stanchion last time.

    There is no real damping; just grease and friction.

    It has two hard polyurethane bushings to dampen shock top out. That's why it clunks when the front wheel is off the ground. I need to find some short springs or rubber bumbers I can use in place of the polyurethane bushings.

    It will be fun trying to improve this shock.

  28. #28
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    So my fork was delivered today. I got the 120mm version and I must say that I'm impressed so far.

    Its 6.8 pounds, which is heavy. But its only 1.5 pounds heavier that a rockshock Tora. It no way compared to a bluto, but it looks very similar, and it about $500 less.

    Here are some pics by itself, and next to a bluto:












    So I figure there are 2 ways to look at it:
    1. its a big ugly paperweight
    2. Its a 120mm fatbike shock, with a straight steerer for $120. Sure its heavy, but what do you want for the $$$.

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    I improved my shock... LOL... I removed the polyurethane bushings for shock top out with rubber bumpers - the bumpers look just like the ones on my shower door. I cut the height of the bumper to the same height as the original bushings. I realized that if the height is taller than the original, then I lose travel and since the fork can't fully extend, the lockout doesn't work.

    The lockout works and now I don't have the loud clunk when the shock tops out.

    I tried to use springs but couldn't find springs that were stiff and small enough to dampen the weight of the fork and tire lifting off the ground.
    Last edited by linklight; 03-17-2015 at 12:14 PM.

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    Looks cool. I was telling myself there was no need for a front fork on my fatbike in winter when I have a full squish for the summer months. With the past couple days up here in VT being in the 40's and freezing overnight, people without snowshoes or bikes have put huge holes on the trail. Biking for a few hours over the weekend almost made my arms fall off.

    Let us know how it feels after install and some miles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blown240 View Post
    So my fork was delivered today. I got the 120mm version and I must say that I'm impressed so far.

    Its 6.8 pounds, which is heavy. But its only 1.5 pounds heavier that a rockshock Tora. It no way compared to a bluto, but it looks very similar, and it about $500 less.

    Here are some pics by itself, and next to a bluto:












    So I figure there are 2 ways to look at it:
    1. its a big ugly paperweight
    2. Its a 120mm fatbike shock, with a straight steerer for $120. Sure its heavy, but what do you want for the $$$.
    So whats the verdict, how do you like it?

    Quote Originally Posted by linklight View Post
    I improved my shock... LOL... I removed the polyurethane bushings for shock top out with rubber bumpers - the bumpers look just like the ones on my shower door. I cut the height of the bumper to the same height as the original bushings. I realized that if the height is taller than the original, then I lose travel and since the fork can't fully extend, the lockout doesn't work.

    The lockout works and now I don't have the loud clunk when the shock tops out.

    I tried to use springs but couldn't find springs that were stiff and small enough to dampen the weight of the fork and tire lifting off the ground.

    Any pics of these mods?

  32. #32
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    I haven't gotten a chance to ride mine yet. So far it has just been a mockup fork on my current build.

    Teaser shot:


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    What frame is that? It looks like an old 26" downhill frame, did you just do a new rear triangle?

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    I saw the pic of your rear triangle in the other thread. That bike looks like its going to be a fun ride. Are those stock mongoose 100mm rims?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenPsz View Post
    What frame is that? It looks like an old 26" downhill frame, did you just do a new rear triangle?

    Quote Originally Posted by momikey View Post
    I saw the pic of your rear triangle in the other thread. That bike looks like its going to be a fun ride. Are those stock mongoose 100mm rims?
    OOPS! Didn't mean to derail this thread. I will do a thread for this bike later today.

  36. #36
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    This fork looks an awful lot like the suntour XCT type fork. I wonder if the internals are the same, and if you could put the new hydraulic damper from the 2015 XCT into it. Second thought, looks like the stanchion diameter is 32mm like the XCR. Better dampener is available for it.

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    Any updates on these forks, now that you have been able to put some miles on them? Is it an improvement over the rigid fork it replaced? Any problems?

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    ...my $125 fat fork. Chopsmitty style. Started as a RST M29 -80mm travel. I plan to shave another full pound off the custom crown.

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    This seems like a waste of money. Why would you pay money to make your bike heavier and ride poorly?

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by xbmedic View Post
    Any updates on these forks, now that you have been able to put some miles on them? Is it an improvement over the rigid fork it replaced? Any problems?
    Its actually not too bad. I only have 1 real ride on it, but it does smooth out the trail. As far as an improvement; I guess that depends on if adding a few pounds is worth the softer ride. Its nowhere near a Bluto, but better than a walmart fork.

  41. #41
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    I'm more interested in durability. Too early to know, yes, but pls keep us posted, thanks!
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    That looks killer, chopsmitty. Did you CNC the brace and crown? Is the crown and steerer a single piece?

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    Yes


    Standard two piece.

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    Chopsmitty, that is cool!

  45. #45
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    Any updates on experience with the cheap chinese fork?

  46. #46
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    Anyone tried this cheap fork from China?

    upgrade more druable warranty 26*4 fat bike fork,spread 135mm snow bike suspension fork,sand bike fork-in Bicycle Fork from Sports & Entertainment on Aliexpress.com | Alibaba Group

    $125 shipped to the U.S. From alibaba.

    The weight says "2840" which i assume is grams which would make it 6.3 lbs.
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    Oh snap that would be awesome of one of the Bike directs cheap fat bikes!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    ways out of my freelance writer's budget.
    rodale? you know of a gal named lesley s.?

    as far as cheap sus goes, go the loose limb route. it's free, infinitely tuneable, maintenance free, light, and make you stronger then running a sissy fork. better for ya than doing curls for the girls

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by soarftb View Post
    Anyone tried this cheap fork from China?
    Im pretty sure thats the same one I have.

  50. #50
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    What is up with all of the fat bike suspension forks that alibaba has? Why are the main stream fork manufactures not having these?

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenPsz View Post
    What is up with all of the fat bike suspension forks that alibaba has? Why are the main stream fork manufactures not having these?
    Perhaps mainstream manufacturers don't want to sell junk.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    Perhaps mainstream manufacturers don't want to sell junk.
    Not so much they are cheaper forks but that Alibaba has Fat Bike suspension forks at all.

    If you look around on their site there are a fewer "higher" end type of forks, even a reverse fork design.

    Just puzzling that the normal fork manufactures seem to be ignoring this segment of bikes.

  53. #53
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    Any updates from anyone using their cheapo forks on the ride, function or quality? Any other cheap Bluto alternatives spotted online? Thanks.
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    One very big advantage is the 135mm hub spacing. No need for other hubs. I also use 29+ wheels, so a Bluto conversion will cost me big $$$$, anyone tried the 29+ wheel yet?

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenPsz View Post
    Not so much they are cheaper forks but that Alibaba has Fat Bike suspension forks at all.

    If you look around on their site there are a fewer "higher" end type of forks, even a reverse fork design.

    Just puzzling that the normal fork manufactures seem to be ignoring this segment of bikes.
    I looked around and saw nothing that even remotely resembled "higher end," certainly nothing that even comes anywhere near a Lefty or Bluto. All I saw was walmart quality forks, overpriced pieces of scrap metal.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    I looked around and saw nothing that even remotely resembled "higher end," certainly nothing that even comes anywhere near a Lefty or Bluto. All I saw was walmart quality forks, overpriced pieces of scrap metal.
    Not sure why you seem to be looking for an argument but I guess everyone has a hobby.

    If your base level idea of acceptable suspension fork for a fatty is a Bluto or Lefty then yes everything is going to be junk in comparison. But then this sport has always had people that seem a bit on the snobbish side when it comes to equipment and are very hung up on names of manufactures. I remember the days when Rock Shock put out some pretty crappy stuff but their stuff worked good enough to become what they are today.

    DNM USD 6 FAT BIKE FORK /snow bike fork 100mm travel-in Bicycle Fork from Sports & Entertainment on Aliexpress.com | Alibaba Group

    15*135mm 3K Matte Finish Full Carbon T700 Fiber Full Suspension 100mm Travel Fat Bike Full Suspension Front Forks-in Bicycle Fork from Sports & Entertainment on Aliexpress.com | Alibaba Group

    ( I wonder if this is a "real" Bluto)
    manual lockout fat bike fork/sram rock shox Bluto Bicycle Fork for Rockshox 26'' /fat bike fork -in Bicycle Fork from Sports & Entertainment on Aliexpress.com | Alibaba Group

  57. #57
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    here's what I saw: Fat Bike Suspension Fork-Fat Bike Suspension Fork Manufacturers, Suppliers and Exporters on Alibaba.comBicycle Fork

    as for your results, 1: see also "fork of many names." most report that the fork is heavy, damping is not the best and the effective travel is less than advertised travel.

    2. intriguing, but like most unbranded product, I'd have serious questions about durability & effectiveness. What was their R&D process? did they test in the field? On a shock dyno? What are the product specifications? What kind of damping are they using? All we have are pictures and no mention of materials like stanchion coating, damping & spring type, application, recommended rider weight, etc. With just a picture, i'm more than a little skeptical. To use your Rockshox analogy, I'd be more trusting of a company like RST, who has established a dealer/distribution network, invested in branding and marketing and submits their products to media outlets for testing and review. They have a reputation for producing products at a price point, but are also working to improve their reputation. Conversely, what do we know about "Angle Sports?"
    3. I also wonder.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenPsz View Post
    ... Just puzzling that the normal fork manufactures seem to be ignoring this segment of bikes.
    Perhaps they're not ignoring this segment of bikes, but ignoring a source of headaches and resulting damage.

    The good 'ol:
    90% of your hassles come from 10% of your customers.
    If you can identify and avoid that 10%, you've a lot less hassles, lowered cost, avoid damage to reputation and more profit at the bottom line.

    DRIFT
    In one business I had, I quickly learnt to identify most of that "10%" - only it would have been around 30% - potential disaster. I was "too busy" to accommodate them and referred them to a jerk in the same business across town. He thanked me for that. Often.
    In two years, he closed his business and got into something else, as he couldn't take all the hassles anymore.
    Must have been my evil twin who did it.

    And he was very good at what he went into: win for my segment, win for me, win for him, win for his new customers, win for his new segment.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

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    What I have never understood in threads like these is why complain about something you have never tried or don't plan on buying. Don't want a cheap Chinese fork don't buy one.

    But a lot of people don't have $600+ to spend on a fork and are willing to take a chance on something cheap that is more comfortable to ride than a rigid fork. You just go in knowing you generally may get a more lemons than lemonade.

    Remember even trusted fork companies like RST did not start out all that great but people took a chance and it paid off.

  60. #60
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    Here's the rub: what happens when you spend $3-400 and buy a cheap, chinese fork and learn it's a piece of shite? Then you go and spend another $600 on the fork you should have gotten in the first place. Who's the thrifty smarty pants, the guy who forked out his hard earned cash for the good stuff right away and got something that performed well out of the box, or the cheapskate who thought he'd save a few bucks, but got a lemon instead, so he ended up buying twice?

    Since we're on a mountain biking forum here, you do realize that comfort is a side effect of a suspension fork and not the raison d'être for fitting one, right? if you think that RST is a trusted brand, i get the feeling that we're not inhabiting the same universe...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    Here's the rub: what happens when you spend $3-400 and buy a cheap, chinese fork and learn it's a piece of shite? Then you go and spend another $600 on the fork you should have gotten in the first place. Who's the thrifty smarty pants, the guy who forked out his hard earned cash for the good stuff right away and got something that performed well out of the box, or the cheapskate who thought he'd save a few bucks, but got a lemon instead, so he ended up buying twice?

    Since we're on a mountain biking forum here, you do realize that comfort is a side effect of a suspension fork and not the raison d'être for fitting one, right? if you think that RST is a trusted brand, i get the feeling that we're not inhabiting the same universe...
    What do you care what people spend their money on or how they spend it, are you the dad of the world? You sound just like the people that rail on cheap bikes like those from BD where for the majority of bikers cheap works.

    Comfort as a "side effect" and not the reason to put a suspension fork on a bike in the first place? I guess you want to talk better handling and such or do you just want to argue? Ridged sucks and comfort is going to be the first thing people feel when they change to ANY suspension fork, then handling etc... comes into play.

    Just go and buy that Bluto, Lefty or Fox or whatever you want. I would take a chance on one of these cheap forks until the used market for a more name brand fork starts up, then if the cheap fork is not doing the job I would get a better used fork. But dropping $600+ on a new fork has never been something I have done in 20+ years of mountain biking.

    Please feel free to argue with someone else since you seem to want to "win" the internet argument and just want to argue to argue. So tell you what you win!!!

  62. #62
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    Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike-11265107_10152984137979624_5333756995863421564_n.jpg

    cheap and look the part. 100mm DNM USD-6, clock 500km and so far so good. a lbs got it from me, apparently they have tons of different option straight from the mfg, 150 or 135mm, straight or tapered, etc..

    no issues, extremely stiff. gripe is on the porky side, scale weight on mine at 2.6kg with TA. mine is 150mm, tapered. performance wise so far great no complain all is goood, accept they got crappy decals.

    lets see how well this hold up after another 500km or so.

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    sorry cost is SGD$688. which is about USD$500

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lordie View Post
    sorry cost is SGD$688. which is about USD$500
    I wouldn't exactly call that cheap. I would just get a Bluto for that cost. Does this fork have an advantage over the Bluto?
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  65. #65
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    So yesterday I was able to get a real ride in on this fork. About 8 miles. Lots of single track. A trail that I have literally ridden hundreds of times.

    Here is the bike its on:




    I got this for for $105 and its the 120mm travel version. 6.8 pounds.

    As far as the fork goes, you for sure feel the weight. While I was still able to wheelie this bike, it wasn't easy. Of the fast downhill single track it was lacking. It took a bit to get it moving, and then had a hard time recovering from the hit before the next one. On gravel roads it was fine, and on slow big hits, like logs and bigger rocks, its totally fine.

    It feels slightly more flexy than an old RST fork I had, and in most other ways felt very similar.

    My Conclusion: IF you want it for a box store bike, like a Mongoose Beast or Dolomite, its a great upgrade. IF you have a bit nicer fat bike, don't mind the weight, and aren't really going to push the bike hard, then its probably ok. If you ride hard, its a waste.

    Lets put it this way. I wont be getting another for my Rigid fat bike. I would rather stay with the salsa fork. And if this Intense had a tapered head tube, it would get a Bluto.

    I am in no way trying to cause an argument here. These are just my personal feelings from a trail that I have been riding for over 20 years.

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    that is one of the coolest fat bikes ever!!!!

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    Great idea and nice work on the rear triangle, blown240. I think I read somewhere that a more known company was coming out with a 1 1/8" straight steerer tube fat fork soon, but don't recall the details now.

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    Thanks! RST is supposed to be coming out with a straight steerer version. That would be cool.

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    I'm pretty sure it was RST, but I think they were going to use the 150mm thruaxle hub. Sweet, have to buy a new hub and lace it up.

    Nice to hear an actual review on it. I've contemplated it, but I'll wait for a couple more reviews. It does sound heavy as sin, but for a bike that's already heavy, why not. Blown, do you know if the stanchiosn are 28mm, or are they bigger.

    Also, what tire pressure were you at? With normal suspension, I'd be fine running higher pressures, but with this fork and the low initial compression, I'd still want to use low tire pressures.

  70. #70
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    28mm stanctions. Maybe smaller actually. I don't have my micrometer here, but they are smaller than the 32mm on my Rockshox Tora. I am running 12psi, but I am 240lbs.

    Another thing I forgot to mention: With the slack head angle of 64 degrees on the fat Intense, the fork will not move if you push straight down on the bars when stopped. Whwn moving this doesn't really matter since you roll into bumps. But on my FOX forks, you push straight down and they more nicely...

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by soarftb View Post
    I wouldn't exactly call that cheap. I would just get a Bluto for that cost. Does this fork have an advantage over the Bluto?
    Well it's cheap at this part of the world. Advantage is I like the look and it comes with all sort of configuration so dun need to swap hubs and relace.

  72. #72
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    $500 is inexpensive for a decent fat suspension fork, but a lot fat bikers are cheap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KenPsz View Post
    What do you care what people spend their money on or how they spend it, are you the dad of the world? You sound just like the people that rail on cheap bikes like those from BD where for the majority of bikers cheap works.
    Cautioning people about good brands vs bad brands is pretty much the point of internet discussions on parts, so people who are googling/researching can get the straight story instead of some feel-good BS.

    dropping $600+ on a new fork has never been something I have done in 20+ years of mountain biking.
    Considering inflation, that's not much of a stretch for most people.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slow_Thyroid_Bike View Post
    Cautioning people about good brands vs bad brands is pretty much the point of internet discussions on parts, so people who are googling/researching can get the straight story instead of some feel-good BS.
    Which would be fine if anyone had actual experience with the forks in question to give real feed back, not just the response of "Chinese cheap forks are junk".


    Considering inflation, that's not much of a stretch for most people.
    do you have $20 you can send me I need to get lunch. $600 is $600 regardless of the time frames involved. But they the bike industry is still trying to convince people a "good bike" will cost you 3 grand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KenPsz View Post
    Which would be fine if anyone had actual experience with the forks in question to give real feed back, not just the response of "Chinese cheap forks are junk".
    That's just inductive logic and context, plus forks aren't exactly simple like a steel tube.


    do you have $20 you can send me I need to get lunch. $600 is $600 regardless of the time frames involved. But they the bike industry is still trying to convince people a "good bike" will cost you 3 grand.
    No, $600 today is actually more like $380 in 1995, or a $1900 bike back in the day. So, say we're looking at a 1995 Hoo Koo E Koo, MSRP of 780 in 1995 dollars....that gives us about 1200 bucks for a decent hardtail today. That'll get you a Goblin, an X-Caliber 8, or any other number of capable hardtails (that are 29ers even, much better!). I'd wager that's a decent bike and they even managed to get a Rock Shox fork in the budget and tubeless ready rims.

    Then again, we're talking about fatbikes here....which are inherently more expensive. If not for the production costs, then because demand has shifted up and adjusted prices upward due to scarcity, as economic systems tend to do. You're wanting a sort-of-novelty item (with a pseudo monopoly/oligopoly being that almost nobody makes them) on a niche/novelty subset of bikes. What's a good fork cost for a 26'er these days? That shitty fork is a cash grab because they're filling a hole and know people are going to jump at the chance regardless of its quality. Rock Shox however has a brand to protect and can't go making crap forks.

    Now, if peoples' underlying definition of a "good" bike has evolved over the years as technology has changed the norm, that's a different story. What was a full susser in 1995? And how would that full susser stack up to one today adjusting for purchasing power?

    I'm saying this as I'm meeting a buddy who *still rides his bikes from 1995*. He rides a 1995 Hoo Koo E Koo and an old like 2002 Rocky Mountain Carve. He knows a basic 29er from today will slaughter BOTH of his bikes.

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    Yeah because people think in terms of inflation costs when they buy something. LOL

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    Quote Originally Posted by KenPsz View Post
    Yeah because people think in terms of inflation costs when they buy something. LOL
    Rational people do when comparing against a 20 year time horizon of costs, yes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slow_Thyroid_Bike View Post
    Rational people do when comparing against a 20 year time horizon of costs, yes.
    Yeah sure what ever you say boss.

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    Thank you for sharing your observations regarding this fork. Much appreciated.

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    Cheap fork

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch R. View Post
    Thank you for sharing your observations regarding this fork. Much appreciated.
    thanks for the info. Whole lot of walgoose fat bikers looking for suspension. For the comfort, not performance. This fork does fit some people's purpose and budget

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    Quote Originally Posted by MTBLoCo29 View Post
    With hubs that wide and the stress from the extra weight and rolling resistance of big tires, the QRs are not stiff enough to keep the forks from flexing.
    Neither weight nor rolling resistance on a fatbike is the issue with QR vs Thru-axle.
    Industry is going that way on 29er's etc, and thus with FatBikes as well. It helps with a suspension fork with flex, but it's not a fat bike specific consideration.

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    can you show photos of the rubber damper and/or how to take the fork apart?

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    Thanks to the OP for posting this. Cursed with a straight stem/QR combo, I ended up getting one of these in June, and it's probably not the best but way better than a regular fork, at least if you are not too heavy. Lasted fine so far.

  84. #84
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    I haven't heard anything new lately in the fatbike suspension fork area. Any news? Semi long term review of these cheap forks? Any other cheap forks out there?
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  85. #85
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    I have a couple decent rides on mine. Its for sure a cheap fork and it acts like one. I can accept that. The one thing that scared me a bit is how much it flexes. Granted I have 203mm rotors with BB7s, and Im 250lbs with my gear on, but It flexes well over an inch under hard braking.

    That being said. I don't have any plans on taking it off because its still better that a rigid fork on the bike its on. And I have another fat bike that is rigid...

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    I just purchased the same fork and have the same "top out" problem. What did you use to replace the original bushings/bump stops?

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    I don't know the model, but it's RST.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike-img_3138.jpg  

    Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike-img_3099.jpg  

    Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike-img_3112.jpg  


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    Thanks for the reply but I don't see an image. Was there supposed to be an attachment?

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    Quote Originally Posted by emgraphix View Post
    Thanks for the reply but I don't see an image. Was there supposed to be an attachment?
    Sorry, I have edited the post above.

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    Great, thanks Skoroed. So off a cheapie RST fork? Your bike looks amazing BTW.

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    Quote Originally Posted by emgraphix View Post
    Great, thanks Skoroed. So off a cheapie RST fork? Your bike looks amazing BTW.
    It's not mine )). This bike is sub-brand of Giant for limited markets. You can see the spec here. iRide ROCKER 1 Titanium - Momentum Bikes | International
    The retail price is about $700, so fork should be cheap. Since I can't identify the fork model name I guess it's made by RST exclusively for Giant, but not for OEM or after market.

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    Awesome. Thanks

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    I purchased the "PASAK" brand fork with 85mm travel from eBay and installed it on my Gravity BEM. I was optimistic that it would be a little better than the the other reviews on this thread since they advertised hydraulic lock out, but it's very much like what Blown240 described in post #65.

    I am conflicted about recommending this fork. I have 5 rides on a local intermediate-level trail (~50 miles total). It smooths the trail, and it definitely absorbs big bumps. It also has the friction affect that Blown describes, but performs fine when the bike is actually in motion. It, and its ilk, are still the only 1/8" straight steerer option with 135mm front hubs; and I don't see options on the horizon. It looks like the RST Renegade is trying to occupy the same market space as the Bluto. As a point of comparison, it is not as nice as the Suntour XCM HLO (which is a good fork for the price, but far from elite) on my hardtail 29er, but does absorb big hits without significantly bouncing me.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike-20160527_resize.jpg  


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    Good job! My Cheap Fork

    [edit: took mine off and replaced it with the original fork. Crashed once, and it never rode the same after. Too heavy. Becomes less responsive quickly. I just need to save my pennies for the real deal. Leaving my original review below]

    Hello All, Just bought a front suspension fork off of eBay from Hong Kong and thought I would provide my review and tips. Keep in mind, I'm the kind of guy that rides a Gravity Bullseye Monster (GBEM) and buys forks from Hong Kong off of eBay, so keep in mind the expertise level as you read. The short recommendation is, buy one. I just did a ride today on a really rocky trail (search the Quarry Trail in Utah, it's a very well known trail). I haven't had this much fun biking in a really long time. The fat tires climb at least as well as a 29er and are way more stable coming down. In fact, the reason I decided to ride fat on this trail is because the last time I took my Hi-Fi on the trail, I thought I was going to die. Today, there was no fear. The fork really smooths out the trail and I was hitting some pretty big rocks. Look, this fork is not nearly as good as the one on my Hi-Fi, but it will do. Here are the things to keep in mind:
    1- I paid $65 for the fork plus $40 shipping (plus I will have to pay a few bucks on my use tax at the end of the year, because I'm honest like that).
    2- You will need to buy at least a star nut and a crown race, so you might as well just buy the whole headset. The crown race on the GBEM is not removable. The fork is machined with a crown race, so you will need to buy one for the new fork. If you want to be sure it matches your bottom bearings, why not just buy the whole head set? You need the star nut and crown race anyway (which is about $10 for the two) so spend $3 more and get the headset. Buy the headset now so it will be at your house when your fork shows up. The star nut can be a little tricky, but I just used a screw through an appropriately sized socket and then through the star nut, and then pound with a rubber mallet. GO SLOW!!! See that white tube in the first picture? That's a 1 1/4 inch piece of PVC pipe. That and a rubber mallet are what you need to get the crown race onto your new fork. A little grease helps as well.
    3- Get the 135 mm spacing for the GBEM. Probably 150 for a Mongoose, but I don't know for sure.
    4-The disk brake caliper attachment on the fork is hokey. You wont be able to add different brackets. I'm not sure if it will work with larger size disks. It works fine with the stock disks.
    5- On the rebound, the stanchions slam into the lowers with enough force, that if you are not expecting it, they might slam the handlebars right out of your hands. Also, the slamming will make you think something is lose in your headtube. It's not. It's just the fork.
    6- The lockout seems to be completely mechanical and not hydraulic. It won't lock unless the stanchions are fully extended. You are not going to be locking out on the fly. You are going to have to stop your bike and extend the stanchions and then lock out the fork.
    7- I went with the 100 mm. I think it messed with my geometry. If I had it to do over again, I'd get the 85mm version.

    So, even though it sounds like I hate the fork, I love the fork. Definite recommend. I have been mountain biking since 1996, and I'm not sure if I have ever had as much fun as I had today. At best, it's been a very long time since I had this kind of fun. I'm saving my pennies for a full suspension fat bike. But this will do for the time being.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike-wp_20160903_001.jpg  

    Cheap suspension fork for my fat bike-wp_20160903_004.jpg  

    Last edited by littlereddog; 11-16-2016 at 11:27 AM.

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    2nd That LittleRedDog

    I've gotten a few more rides in on my BEM/Pasak 85mm travel fork. I'm not taking it off. I lI've having a fat bike to handle sketchy stuff and this fork does a nice job eliminating front bounce when I'm riding.

    Quote Originally Posted by littlereddog View Post
    Hello All, Just bought a front suspension fork off of eBay from Hong Kong and thought I would provide my review and tips. Keep in mind, I'm the kind of guy that rides a Gravity Bullseye Monster (GBEM) and buys forks from Hong Kong off of eBay, so keep in mind the expertise level as you read. The short recommendation is, buy one. I just did a ride today on a really rocky trail (search the Quarry Trail in Utah, it's a very well known trail). I haven't had this much fun biking in a really long time. The fat tires climb at least as well as a 29er and are way more stable coming down. In fact, the reason I decided to ride fat on this trail is because the last time I took my Hi-Fi on the trail, I thought I was going to die. Today, there was no fear. The fork really smooths out the trail and I was hitting some pretty big rocks. Look, this fork is not nearly as good as the one on my Hi-Fi, but it will do. Here are the things to keep in mind:
    1- I paid $65 for the fork plus $40 shipping (plus I will have to pay a few bucks on my use tax at the end of the year, because I'm honest like that).
    2- You will need to buy at least a star nut and a crown race, so you might as well just buy the whole headset. The crown race on the GBEM is not removable. The fork is machined with a crown race, so you will need to buy one for the new fork. If you want to be sure it matches your bottom bearings, why not just buy the whole head set? You need the star nut and crown race anyway (which is about $10 for the two) so spend $3 more and get the headset. Buy the headset now so it will be at your house when your fork shows up. The star nut can be a little tricky, but I just used a screw through an appropriately sized socket and then through the star nut, and then pound with a rubber mallet. GO SLOW!!! See that white tube in the first picture? That's a 1 1/4 inch piece of PVC pipe. That and a rubber mallet are what you need to get the crown race onto your new fork. A little grease helps as well.
    3- Get the 135 mm spacing for the GBEM. Probably 150 for a Mongoose, but I don't know for sure.
    4-The disk brake caliper attachment on the fork is hokey. You wont be able to add different brackets. I'm not sure if it will work with larger size disks. It works fine with the stock disks.
    5- On the rebound, the stanchions slam into the lowers with enough force, that if you are not expecting it, they might slam the handlebars right out of your hands. Also, the slamming will make you think something is lose in your headtube. It's not. It's just the fork.
    6- The lockout seems to be completely mechanical and not hydraulic. It won't lock unless the stanchions are fully extended. You are not going to be locking out on the fly. You are going to have to stop your bike and extend the stanchions and then lock out the fork.
    7- I went with the 100 mm. I think it messed with my geometry. If I had it to do over again, I'd get the 85mm version.

    So, even though it sounds like I hate the fork, I love the fork. Definite recommend. I have been mountain biking since 1996, and I'm not sure if I have ever had as much fun as I had today. At best, it's been a very long time since I had this kind of fun. I'm saving my pennies for a full suspension fat bike. But this will do for the time being.

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by TucsonBamaRider View Post
    I've gotten a few more rides in on my BEM/Pasak 85mm travel fork. I'm not taking it off. I lI've having a fat bike to handle sketchy stuff and this fork does a nice job eliminating front bounce when I'm riding.
    So is the Pasik a hydraulic lock-out?

    Also, when the fork extends to it's full length, does it hit hard? Make a clunking sound?

    My guess is that if it has hydraulic lock-out, then it won't have the hard extension problem.

  97. #97
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    The Ebay description says "car oil spring fork." If it is hydraulic damped, the friction damping overwhelms it. I do get a "thunk" when I lift the front wheel. I've bottomed it out several times, but I don't notice it at the time. I just see the grease line on the stanchions showing that I used all of the travel.

  98. #98
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    I'm also looking at them... I use my fatty on road pretty much only, do you guys think it's a good choice? I just don't want something that will stop working in 3 months...

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flugelbinder View Post
    I'm also looking at them... I use my fatty on road pretty much only, do you guys think it's a good choice? I just don't want something that will stop working in 3 months...
    No, probably not a good choice. For road, I always like to have the lightest bike with the thinnest tires. This will add tons of weight to your bike for minimal benefit (e.g., when you decide to go off of a curb). And as far a reliability, don't know yet, but they are probably not super reliable.

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by littlereddog View Post
    ...as far a reliability, don't know yet, but they are probably not super reliable.
    This is what I'm interested in knowing, as a fact.

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