Carbon fat bike feedback- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Carbon fat bike feedback

    I recently just finished building my 9zero7 Whiteout carbon and absolutely love the thing...... But I am stuck on my next decision should I be a weight weenie or buy a Mastodon fork?

    My end goal was to build a really light carbon fat bike and it currently weights about 27.5lbs. I know I can change out crank, seat post, handle bars and stem to drop roughly 2-2.5lbs to get me down to the 25lb range. If I add the Mastodon it will add 5lbs to the build. I want to stay light but a suspension fork sounds better for ride quality.

    I am looking for some insight and thoughts from anyone who cares to discuss.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by justin51 View Post
    I recently just finished building my 9zero7 Whiteout carbon and absolutely love the thing...... But I am stuck on my next decision should I be a weight weenie or buy a Mastodon fork?

    My end goal was to build a really light carbon fat bike and it currently weights about 27.5lbs. I know I can change out crank, seat post, handle bars and stem to drop roughly 2-2.5lbs to get me down to the 25lb range. If I add the Mastodon it will add 5lbs to the build. I want to stay light but a suspension fork sounds better for ride quality.

    I am looking for some insight and thoughts from anyone who cares to discuss.

    Thanks in advance!
    I have an Farley 7 (Aluminum) that came with a Mastodon (~36lbs)
    Recently added a Farley 9.6 Carbon with Rigid fork (~27lbs)

    I hardly ever ride the 7 now,
    ...Wifey sure likes it though.



    Your results will depend mostly on your trail conditions.

    We don't have a lot of heavily rooted, rutted, rocky single tracks that would really benefit from a suspension fork.
    The few times I would find it helpful are not enough for me to want to lug the extra 9lbs around all day.
    (of course adding a Pro Mastodon to a Carbon bike would only net you ~4 extra pounds though)

    When I'm on the 9.6 I just choose my lines a little more carefully on rough patches,
    It's extremely quick/nimble tossing it around corners and climbs almost every thing I point it at. It's a Mountain Goat!
    The Mastodon + 27.5 x 4.5 Fat tires on my Aluminum 7 is an absolute steam roller, just point it down hill and roll over everything in Beast Mode.

    I've never owned or even tried a full squish bike.
    Bought my first Farley for Winter/Snow riding 3 years ago
    but discovered riding Fat all year round was Funner!

    The Mastodon can be a bit of a disadvantage in the Winter and I usually have it locked out completely.
    Running 27.5x4.5's under 4psi gives me all the squish I need, and a heavier front end just pushes deeper in the snow I'm trying to float on.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Carbon fat bike feedback-jasper_05.jpg  

    Trek Farley Family
    Rage Red 9.8 ROARange 7
    Blue Smoke 9.6 Viper Red 7

  3. #3
    A Surly Maverick
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    There is always the LAUF option.

    Plus :- Carbon fork with some sus

    Minus :- Big $$$
    Life IS a Beach and then you Corrode :)

  4. #4
    turtles make me hot
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    I rode a carbon Salsa once. Amazing how much faster it was than my own bike.
    I like turtles

  5. #5
    Rippin da fAt
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    Quote Originally Posted by justin51 View Post
    I recently just finished building my 9zero7 Whiteout carbon and absolutely love the thing...... But I am stuck on my next decision should I be a weight weenie or buy a Mastodon fork?

    My end goal was to build a really light carbon fat bike and it currently weights about 27.5lbs. I know I can change out crank, seat post, handle bars and stem to drop roughly 2-2.5lbs to get me down to the 25lb range. If I add the Mastodon it will add 5lbs to the build. I want to stay light but a suspension fork sounds better for ride quality.

    I am looking for some insight and thoughts from anyone who cares to discuss.

    Thanks in advance!
    I run my fats as rigid to keep the weight down. Frankly, I do not treat them the way I do my plussers. I take them on flow trails and such but ride the plussers as mountain bikes.

    You wanted light, keep it that way in rigid or add the Mastadon for the rowdy ride. Think about it, you can always swap forks rather quickly for a change up. Just another option similar to two wheelsets fat and plus for your fatbike.
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanuckMountainMan View Post
    I have an Farley 7 (Aluminum) that came with a Mastodon (~36lbs)
    Recently added a Farley 9.6 Carbon with Rigid fork (~27lbs)

    I hardly ever ride the 7 now,
    ...Wifey sure likes it though.



    Your results will depend mostly on your trail conditions.

    We don't have a lot of heavily rooted, rutted, rocky single tracks that would really benefit from a suspension fork.
    The few times I would find it helpful are not enough for me to want to lug the extra 9lbs around all day.
    (of course adding a Pro Mastodon to a Carbon bike would only net you ~4 extra pounds though)

    When I'm on the 9.6 I just choose my lines a little more carefully on rough patches,
    It's extremely quick/nimble tossing it around corners and climbs almost every thing I point it at. It's a Mountain Goat!
    The Mastodon + 27.5 x 4.5 Fat tires on my Aluminum 7 is an absolute steam roller, just point it down hill and roll over everything in Beast Mode.

    I've never owned or even tried a full squish bike.
    Bought my first Farley for Winter/Snow riding 3 years ago
    but discovered riding Fat all year round was Funner!

    The Mastodon can be a bit of a disadvantage in the Winter and I usually have it locked out completely.
    Running 27.5x4.5's under 4psi gives me all the squish I need, and a heavier front end just pushes deeper in the snow I'm trying to float on.
    Trails around here for the most part are rutty and rocky...... I have contemplated doing what BansheeRune said and getting the fork and swapping it out I this is my only bike. Thing is the Mastodon is 150MM fork and the 9Zero7's front hub is a 135mm but Hope make's an adapter kit to adapt which is perfect.

  7. #7
    rth009
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    It all depends on how and where you like to ride. I like to get nuts on the descents and I live in the Rocky Mountains. I also carry about 15 pounds of beer and pizza belly, so weight weenieness doesn't matter to me. I've been on a fat bike with a suspension fork since 2015 and would not go back to rigid.

  8. #8
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    To echo others it is all based on your desires, where you ride, and your stable of bikes. I have one trail bike, a fatty with a Mastodon, that is my all seasons ride and I LOVE the fork. If my fatty was a secondary or winter-only bike I probably would have stayed no-sus on it. Maybe. If you have roots/rocks and will spend some time on the bike then go for it. You can always swap with the rigid as needs be. The downside will be noticeable heft up front and more mechanical complexity.

  9. #9
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    I donít miss suspension on snow. I canít live without it on dirt.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  10. #10
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    You could go with a RS Bluto to save a pound.

  11. #11
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    Would love one but I would cry the first time I dinged it up after spending a lot of money. I ride mine every day in gravel, snow, rain, mud, sand, ice, and anything else I can find. I have crashed so many times I have lost count. My steel frame has countless scratches, paint chips, gouges, and patches surface rust from the cable rub going all the way through the pain/powder coating.

    If I had the money to buy a new bike every two years sign me up for a top of the line Salsa.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I donít miss suspension on snow. I canít live without it on dirt.
    That's just it, with the many ruts and rocks in the trails in the WI trails my shoulders and elbows are screaming at me!!!! Issue I have is the kit to change my 135mm front hub to 150mm from hope is on backorder right now and can't find one. Otherwise I am oh so close to pulling the trigger on it!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by justin51 View Post
    That's just it, with the many ruts and rocks in the trails in the WI trails my shoulders and elbows are screaming at me!!!! Issue I have is the kit to change my 135mm front hub to 150mm from hope is on backorder right now and can't find one. Otherwise I am oh so close to pulling the trigger on it!
    I hear you about the roots up north. I go up to northern MI (UP) every summer for a couple months and am amazed at all the roots on the trails. I run a RS Bluto in the summer and it works alright. I tried my friends Manitou Mastodon comp and it was quite a bit better than the Bluto. I see a Mastodon in my future, It is a great fork, even the comp which is heavier is impressive. You just smash over everything, it's so plush.

  14. #14
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by justin51 View Post
    That's just it, with the many ruts and rocks in the trails in the WI trails my shoulders and elbows are screaming at me!!!! Issue I have is the kit to change my 135mm front hub to 150mm from hope is on backorder right now and can't find one. Otherwise I am oh so close to pulling the trigger on it!
    My 29er has good roll-over. I took it on one of the winter-trails yesterday. Holy crap, I had forgotten how rooty and nasty all of that stuff is. When the ice and snow fill in the roots, it makes a huge difference. Trail is still technical in the winter, but it's just not fun in the summer. Others in the same area are just not passable in the summer for the same reasons.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by justin51 View Post
    That's just it, with the many ruts and rocks in the trails in the WI trails my shoulders and elbows are screaming at me!!!! Issue I have is the kit to change my 135mm front hub to 150mm from hope is on backorder right now and can't find one. Otherwise I am oh so close to pulling the trigger on it!
    I am in Wisconsin as well and for 5 years my Alu 9:ZERO:7 was rigid. It is now my only bike (#takepittyonme) and just put on a Mastodon. I am a big dude so for me suspension forks don't work the same as they do for lighter riders. I climb much better w/o a suspension fork, but really do value the ability to go down hill with a bit more confidence.

    With that being said, I had a SS rigid Karate Monkey for a summer and I learned more about trail riding in that time then I had in all my years riding hardtails and FS bikes. You have to attack the trails when SS and rigid, which is a lot different then letting the bike do the work for you. If you just sat back and let your body absorb the abuse you would be a wreck.

    I guess my point is this. Ride rigid for a while, learn how to pick the front end up and unload your arms doing over roots, don't tense up. You don't have to pick the front end up so far that you go over the roots, but just enough to get the tire to just skip over the tops of roots and rocks. Then you have to unload the rear tire as you pass over the roots too. It will be a different experience, but you WILL be much more involved in the ride as you know you have to be more active to be fast. Once you get good at rigid you will apply those techniques to your other bikes and become a better rider.

  16. #16
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    Well I got the Mastodon and I am on the fence..... I didn't think the weight would be a huge issue but it's a HUGE difference, I am am missing the lighter version of my bike unfortunately. Which is a bummer, but quite frankly I am not looking to take big drops and like others said just pick different lines. I set out for a year round light weight carbon fat bike and adding a suspension front fork isn't fitting what I set out to do.

  17. #17
    FIF
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    I would echo Dr. Feelygood and go with the Lauf Carbonara.

    They have the regular and light version depending on the weight of the rider and both have about 60mm of travel. With the fork travel and about another 20mm that I get from my tire I am comfortable taking mine off drops up to about 24".

    My full suspension fatty in a medium frame with a Lauf, dropper post, pedals, and Hodag tires runs just under 28lbs.


    My wife's HT in a large frame with Jumbo Jim's and pedals runs just a little over 26lbs.


    If you watch ebay, you could maybe pick up a used Lauf for around $600 to try it out. If it doesn't work, you may be able to resell it and hold most of your money together....just a thought.

    We use our fatty's year round as they are our one arrow quiver. Most guys can't believe it when they get passed by my wife on a fat bike.

    The Lauf's are great! I just would not recommend them for someone who is uber agressive and intends on doing 3ft + drops.
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