Cannondale caad fat 1 or Farley 9.8- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 31 of 31
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    42

    Cannondale caad fat 1 or Farley 9.8

    Ive shortlisted the caad fat 1 and Farley 9.8.
    One thing that's puzzling me about the caad fat is can other crank sets be used on this bike, Cannondale seem to make a big deal about the low Q factor and offset chainring.
    Does anyone know if the lefty hub is the standard lefty Hub and are there any aftermarket brands available for future wheel builds.
    Trek Farley I like the look of the carbon frame and the adjustability of the sliding drop outs and the option of using different wheel sizes and larger tyres. Farley seems to have better wheels and crank etc.

    Has anyone ridden both and what's your verdict.
    The caad fat does look different to other fats with that lefty.

    Any help much appreciated

  2. #2
    Norđwegr
    Reputation: Vegard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1,892
    There are several aftermarket lefty hubs, both for the original style and the supermax. Chris King, Project 321, DT Swiss etc. Wether or not the Olaf has it's own standard I do not know.

    Personally I'm looking at the Canyon Dude and CAAD 1, the Dude wins on weight, but the CAAD has the lefty so it's a toss up. Better climbing or better suspension.
    Last edited by Vegard; 01-31-2016 at 10:32 AM.

  3. #3
    bigger than you.
    Reputation: Gigantic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    3,068
    Craig/Mendon Cyclesmith can verify, but I would assume that they're sing a Lefty Max hub & there are plenty of options for them. I really love the lefty as a fat fork, but the Farley seems better spec-ed.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5,360
    My cousin has a Farley 9.8 and its a pretty sweet bike. I like my bikes to be versatile for any future plans I dream up after a few beers.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    1,144
    I'd recommend trying to get a good demo ride on each, they are very different bikes. The Farley 9.8 is more of a lightweight fast groomed trail, race ready bike, whereas the Cannondale is heavier bike better suited to traditional rough fatbike terrain.
    ‘19 Fargo Ti
    '17 Cutthroat
    '15 Fatboy Expert

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    139
    I believe the caad uses a longer, nonstandard hub called lefty 73 built specifically in conjunction with the lefty olaf. Maybe ask cannondale about it? Crank-wise you would be looking at bb30xl for cannondale and pf120(?) For trek.

    If money is not an issue I would go with the Trek based on geometry (e.g., short chainstays) and flexibility, as you would likely be able to fit a lefty olaf (available at bike24, etc) down the road via project 123 adapters, and get that unique look/reliability on a carbon frame.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    473
    The fat caad is the bike I'm currently lusting over. I feel like it's super expensive for an aluminum frame, though

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    42
    Most replies seem to be covering my thoughts to date, can't help but think the caad fat should be carbon.
    What's involved in fitting a lefty Olaf to a "Farley" / standard fat bike???

  9. #9
    Norđwegr
    Reputation: Vegard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1,892
    Quote Originally Posted by benjyboard View Post
    What's involved in fitting a lefty Olaf to a "Farley" / standard fat bike???
    Pretty much all you need apart from the wheel/hub is a lefty steerer tube that works with your current headtube. You will probably also need some spacers to make up for any space between the headtube and the clamps on the lefty.

    PROJECT 321 | Products: PROJECT 321 Lefty Adapters & Steerers

  10. #10
    blood in / blood out
    Reputation: majack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    357
    Quote Originally Posted by benjyboard View Post
    Most replies seem to be covering my thoughts to date, can't help but think the caad fat should be carbon.
    What's involved in fitting a lefty Olaf to a "Farley" / standard fat bike???
    Well to start, the Olaf is not sold as just a fork option. So you will be waiting a long time to see this happen.
    RICOH for LIFE
    Pain is Weakness

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    139
    Quote Originally Posted by majack View Post
    Well to start, the Olaf is not sold as just a fork option. So you will be waiting a long time to see this happen.
    Actually it is available right now at euro sites like bike24, r2-bike, etc.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Johnnydrz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    477
    I have a CAAD 1. Size small, so Q factor is more of a concern to me. Major difference from the Felt I rode before. You might say that an aluminium frame is an aluminium frame, but the fact remains that Cannondale is not a standard regular frame. Parts are top notch and I really like the Olaf. I was told that the Olaf was not available by itself in North America, at least for now. I'm sure that will change eventually. I'm also trying to get my hands on a 73mm Lefty hub to build a set of 45/60mm rim set of wheels to ride 3" tires. Haven't found any 73mm hub yet.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    42

    Caad fat1

    The Olaf fork is listed at near half the price of the complete caad fat1 bike, making the complete bike more of a bargain. I would like to run 27.5+ wheels on for summer trail riding, so just need to source that front lefty hub, anyone got any info.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: crank1979's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,787
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnnydrz View Post
    I have a CAAD 1. Size small, so Q factor is more of a concern to me. Major difference from the Felt I rode before. You might say that an aluminium frame is an aluminium frame, but the fact remains that Cannondale is not a standard regular frame. Parts are top notch and I really like the Olaf. I was told that the Olaf was not available by itself in North America, at least for now. I'm sure that will change eventually. I'm also trying to get my hands on a 73mm Lefty hub to build a set of 45/60mm rim set of wheels to ride 3" tires. Haven't found any 73mm hub yet.
    I'm waiting for my Fat CAAD 1 to arrive. What are your thoughts on it so far?

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: schnee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,797
    Buddy of mine has the fat CAAD and loves the hell out of it. I know, anecdote ≠ data, but he's a bike nerd that has a dozen bikes and is quite picky about geo and handling so there's that.

    As a Clyde, the CAAD is on my radar mostly because of the fork. The Bluto just isn't burly enough.

    I'll be watching this thread for front hub availability also, because my plan is to get a 29+ wheelset to go along with the fatty feet.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    42
    Wheel change is why I like the idea of the Farley, (along with the carbon frame). If a lefty front hub becomes available that'll fit I'll be swayed back to the cannondale. It seems like I'm not the only one with this quandary. I quite like the idea of a simmer fat / plus sized tired trail bike.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Johnnydrz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    477
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnnydrz View Post
    I have a CAAD 1. Size small, so Q factor is more of a concern to me. Major difference from the Felt I rode before. You might say that an aluminium frame is an aluminium frame, but the fact remains that Cannondale is not a standard regular frame. Parts are top notch and I really like the Olaf. I was told that the Olaf was not available by itself in North America, at least for now. I'm sure that will change eventually. I'm also trying to get my hands on a 73mm Lefty hub to build a set of 45/60mm rim set of wheels to ride 3" tires. Haven't found any 73mm hub yet.

    "I'm waiting for my Fat CAAD 1 to arrive. What are your thoughts on it so far?" End of quote.

    I REALLY REALLY LIKE IT. I rode a Felt DD30 before that I thought was it. Then I tried the CAAD 1. It's the first bike I haven't built up from scratch in the last 15 years... Priority for me is fun riding. I stopped racing a long time ago and although a light bike is always easier to handle, I don't mind the weight of my CAAD 1. My wife also has one, an x-small. She loves it. I don't think you will be disappointed with the OLAF. Dunderbeist rear and Flowbeist front, tubeless. Dropper seatpost for both of us. (Transferred from 2 of our other bikes). It's all big smiles for us. Possibly year-round adventure bikes.

    Johnnydrz

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    686
    Quote Originally Posted by benjyboard View Post
    The Olaf fork is listed at near half the price of the complete caad fat1 bike, making the complete bike more of a bargain. I would like to run 27.5+ wheels on for summer trail riding, so just need to source that front lefty hub, anyone got any info.
    You won't need to source the Lefty 73 hub for + size wheels. The 73 hub is for fat 26er wheels. The Olaf has a SuperMax spindle and any SuperMax compatible hub will bolt on. If you look at the Lefty 73, it's bolt is recessed to accommodate for the extra "hang over" of the 73mm width. Just order whatever rim you want on any lefty hub.

    The Lefty 73 hub has the rotor spaced like the Lefty 50 (Hybrid/standard), so the Olaf comes with the Lefty hybrid adapter brake mount (not SuperMax). So.....

    If you decide on SuperMax/Lefty 2.0 compatible hub (Lefty 60 for example), you'll need to get a standard SuperMax brake mount.

    Or you could use a standard Lefty hub (Lefty 50 for example) and just take off riding...

    I have personally tested a 2016 (SuperMax) Crossmax SL Lefty wheel with SuperMax adapter, spacing is perfect.

  19. #19
    blood in / blood out
    Reputation: majack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    357
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnnydrz View Post
    I was told that the Olaf was not available by itself in North America, at least for now.
    This is what my C-dale Rep said also. So that was the info I was passing along. Glad to see you can get the Olaf in Europe.
    RICOH for LIFE
    Pain is Weakness

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    954
    My best bud owns both, and he weighs about 230(ish). He says he can look down at the rear of the Fatcad and see the rear wheel move side to side from the frame flexing, but he LOVES the Olaf fork. Basically, he sums it up like this, the C-Dale has the better suspension (he owns an Echo w/ a Bluto as well) but his other 2 carbon fatties have way better frames. Basically, he'd like to weld the front end of the Cad, to the Echo or Farley.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    42
    Thanks for the advice on the hubs, so does that mean that a 29 crossmax lefty would fit no problem

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    42
    Good review of the Farley 9.8 with 29 in wheels
    Trek Farley 9.8 Summer Edition | DANOS MODERN(ER) LIFE

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    686
    Yes. Either version will fit. 2015 and later with SuperMax hub and previous Crossmax with prior lefty hub. You'll just have to get the correct brake adapter.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnnydrz View Post
    I have a CAAD 1. Size small, so Q factor is more of a concern to me. Major difference from the Felt I rode before. You might say that an aluminium frame is an aluminium frame, but the fact remains that Cannondale is not a standard regular frame. Parts are top notch and I really like the Olaf. I was told that the Olaf was not available by itself in North America, at least for now. I'm sure that will change eventually. I'm also trying to get my hands on a 73mm Lefty hub to build a set of 45/60mm rim set of wheels to ride 3" tires. Haven't found any 73mm hub yet.
    I've got the 73mm lefty hub from dr.cannondale
    It doesn't come with axle bolt so if want to order make sure you order the right axle bolt too.
    Kh-163 for hub and Kh-162 for axle bolt.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    42
    Subscribing as I too like both bikes.

    The factory promo video on the Fat Caad is pretty awesome! Better than the factory promo video of the other bike mentioned in this thread.

    Looks like a well-working front suspension system to me:






    But can you take off the front wheel without removing the caliper?
    Last edited by elefantrider; 03-20-2016 at 03:18 AM.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtuck1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    439
    Quote Originally Posted by elefantrider View Post
    But can you take off the front wheel without removing the caliper?
    No, you cannot realistically remove the front wheel without first removing the caliper.

    You can remove the front tire without removing the wheel though.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    263
    The caliper is removed really easily. It is on a bracket. You loosen 2 5mm allens, lift it off, then loosen the 5mm holding the hub on. It lines up fine each time.
    Fat CAAD 1 was my first deal with the lefty, so I was please to see that it was so easy.
    If you want a light bike, go with the Farley. Fat CAAD is pretty hefty all stock.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    42
    Thanks. If you need to get it quickly in/out of a car without tools, do you remove the back wheel instead?

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    263
    No. I tried that once, But for my ride (Mazda 5), it is way easier to remove the brake and wheel. Surprising how easy it is. Not quite thru axle easy, but not that bad.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by lwkwafi View Post
    No. I tried that once, But for my ride (Mazda 5), it is way easier to remove the brake and wheel. Surprising how easy it is. Not quite thru axle easy, but not that bad.
    Do you often check if the front hub axle bolt is on secure and not loosening? If it loosens off when riding, the wheel cannot come off by itself when riding because of the caliper interference, correct?

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    263
    I never gave it a second thought, really.
    Correct, you cannot remove the wheel without removing the caliper plate/attachment thing. But I don't think it would ever loosen itself anyway.

    If I were just riding locally, I would put it on the Kuat rack with a velcro strap to hold the front wheel in place, but all of our fat bike races were in NJ, so it was 3 our trips. Just more efficient to keep them inside that way.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-04-2014, 11:31 PM
  2. Is this cannondale f7 caad co2 bike any good
    By Ryan Bachmann in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-17-2014, 11:08 AM
  3. Tire Clearance on a Cannondale CAAD X 5?
    By whistlesglimberg in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-23-2013, 11:52 AM
  4. Cannondale F1000 Caad 5 Frame Question
    By buchanan in forum Cannondale
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 08-14-2013, 07:40 PM
  5. 2006 Cannondale F800 furio VS 2003 F800 CAAD 5
    By Mrwinkle in forum Cannondale
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-09-2011, 05:07 AM

Members who have read this thread: 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.