Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    444

    Burp Proof Ghetto tubeless

    Thanks to this forum I learned about ghetto tubeless and have been successfully using it on my fat bikes since. But given the low pressures there is always the chance of burping. This video showed up on my youtube feed today and it is a great idea on how to make a burp proof ghetto tubeless.

    Short and long is you do a ghetto tubeless then you rubber cement the overhang back to the sidewall of the tire.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0R8uyY0Yytg

    I had not seen this mentioned before so sorry it has and I missed it.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,095
    I would not want the tube to stick to the tire permanently. I suppose if one did not clean the bead the rubber cement would not stick the tube to the bead like a patch. They do make a product called bead sealer for sealing beads to rims. I would call it a light duty adhesive that cleans up pretty easily. I have found it to work well even on taped rims.

  3. #3
    Professional Crastinator
    Reputation: Fleas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    5,308
    I was lucky enough to have my tires stick to my split tubes just from the Stans that seeped through. However, I am having trouble with one of them now since I wrinkled it on the re-install. I have a can of bead sealer ready to go. I will not glue it 100% shut. I'll leave a gap to fill Stans.
    They never came loose while riding, even at tire-wrinkling low pressures.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,494
    Quote Originally Posted by KenPsz View Post
    ... Short and long is you do a ghetto tubeless then you rubber cement the overhang back to the sidewall of the tire.

    I had not seen this mentioned before so sorry it has and I missed it.
    I haven't seen that video posted. Appreciate it.

    For over three years I've been experimenting with that and a variation.

    I've tried with 24" and 26" tubes on my 26" rims. Using a 26" tube is much easier for switching the tire-split-tube combo out to install different tires. That 20" tube he uses in the video would be light, but very tight. I thought I'd like the 24", but I really prefer the 26".

    The variation I'm most interested in, is gluing the split tube to the inside of the tire. The procedure to get it glued to the inside is a real pain. But what is holding me back, is getting a reliable adhesive bond. Working with various scrap tires & tubes, I've tried rubber cement, contact cement, cyanoacrylate and the cyanoacrylate that has rubber in it, and prepped with combos of sanding, alcohol, acetone and naphtha/white-gas, and with and without pre-sealing the tire with diluted rubber cement: they all fail the peel test. Not even close. Wouldnt' even ride, just for a lark. I need to move to the automotive vulcanizing products, but I can't get them in town.

    I haven't tried brake cleaner products as he uses in the video. But they're usually some really really nasty solvents.

    Once I figure out how to do a reliable permanent bond, unless needing puncture protection, it shouldn't need liquid sealant.

    ~edit: Using the 26" tube also leaves the combo loose enough that the tire bead finds its seat as usual.

    P.S.
    I have the parts sitting right behind me, indecisive as to what to try next. I guess I'm off to the store for some brake cleaner.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,494
    And I checked my notes.
    There's the issue with getting into the sealed space when running with liquid sealant when it finally starts to setup into latex boogers.

    And that naphtha/white-gas is supposed to de-vulcanize for bonding.

    From somewhere online I got the tip that if you're thinning rubber cement to seal the inside of the tire, use the same solvent for thinning that you'll be using to de-vulcanize for bonding, else a different thinning solvent may interfere interfere.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 01-13-2014, 09:26 AM
  2. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-15-2011, 12:30 PM
  3. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 01-24-2011, 01:44 AM
  4. Ghetto is as ghetto does...
    By vreihemnotor6 in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 08-05-2007, 08:02 PM
  5. Bullet proof hubs that are not bullet proof.
    By DeeZee in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 10-10-2006, 09:13 PM

Members who have read this thread: 99

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.