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  1. #1
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    Borealis 65mm wheelset?

    Does anyone have the weight for the Borealis 65mm front wheel? I called the company, and they didn't know. Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dougmint View Post
    Does anyone have the weight for the Borealis 65mm front wheel? I called the company, and they didn't know. Thanks.
    I don't have an answer, but I have a request: If you communicate with them further, can you ask if (or suggest) they have a 650b version on the horizon? Is this Eben's company?

    Assuming these will be similar to the 80mm version, they look pretty well built and the eyelets are nice for a change. There's a glaring market need for a 60-65mm alloy rim in the 650b size, and durability is more important to me than weight.
    We still hang bike thieves in Wyoming [Pedal House]

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    How does a company not know the weight of their product??

    At 299 I'd order a set to try as the hubs are worth more than their current price for a wheelset and would be easy to sell off in the secondary market if not happy with pricing

    I recently split with someone on mtbr. He took the hubs and I took the rims, spoke and nipples for a buddy of mine. The wheel is very nicely constructed

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    I emailed Logan on this exact question, he stated "3 pounds for the 100mm
    and just under 3 pounds for the 65mm".... Not Very precise....

    In doing a little digging I recall seeing a rim weight of around 950gm for the
    100 mm, and a built front wheel with the 100 coming in at around 1320gm
    so not bad. Considering they are tubeless and ship free with the strip,tape,
    and
    valve, using Wheelsmith spokes (at least name brand) for $299-
    and no tax other than CO, seems like a great deal.

    I am looking at a set of the 65mm combined with some JJ 26X4.0 snake skins, would make a great relatively light set up for dirt and sand....for $480 OTD....

  5. #5
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    I've been looking for an inexpensive, lighter summer wheelset for my Blackborow. I may have to pull the trigger on the 65mm set! It would be nice to know what they weigh??
    Gettin' Fat!...That's Where It's At!:cool:

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    I'm still on the fence here. Trying to decide if I keep the Clownshoes with Bud and Lou for winter setup, and purchase this Borealis 65mm set for summer combined with something light light the JJ's. Or sell the clownshoes and get a light set of wheels for year round like the HED BAD, or DT Swiss aluminum; or a moderately priced carbon set like Nexties?? Decisions...decisions...
    Gettin' Fat!...That's Where It's At!:cool:

  7. #7
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    100's are nice to have. An extra set of wheels is also nice. It would drive me crazy today to have only two sets of wheels so my 2 cents would be to get the second set of wheels and start saving for a third.

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    Thanks Alphazz. I hear where your coming from on multiple sets of wheels. For $299 it's pretty hard to beat that Borealis deal. I may just have to pull the trigger!
    Gettin' Fat!...That's Where It's At!:cool:

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    It's amazing that no one has a set of these wheels and can weigh them. Not any customers or anyone at the company.

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    Did you call them up ?
    I did yesterday on the Flume bike on sale, got one word answers and
    specifically was asking if the bike shipped with the new tubeless ready
    80mm rims, or the old style that can not be run tubeless.

    They were defensive about the"old" rims and said that is what it ships
    with, but I could get the new FTD tubeless ready 100mm or 65mm
    as a free upgrade...but not the new 80mm....strange way to do business.

    On the rims for sale, at $299 kind of hard to lose on those....
    The 65mm are probably 150-200 gm less than the 100mm
    so likely come in at 1150/1350 F/R.

  11. #11
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    Yep, I called them, and they did not know. I asked if they could weigh them, and they said they were getting ready for some event. I know it's a good deal, but I don't want to buy them if they are heavier than what I already have (Trek Jackalopes 80mm).

  12. #12
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    Borealis 65mm wheelset?

    I ordered a set today. They will definitely be lighter than my clown shoes! I can post a weight when they show up in a few days.


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    Gettin' Fat!...That's Where It's At!:cool:

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    I just ordered a set too, and will post weights as well. One site estimated the rim @ 800 grams, my Mulefut rims are in the 830 g/rim range, so might be lighter by a little, hopefully more. I'm already into summer vs winter tire season. Fruita is an hour away and dry and rideable, but snow's still coming here and studs are a must right now. I'm tired of swapping tires. Pics and weights soon (I hope).
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    I just ordered a set too, and will post weights as well. One site estimated the rim @ 800 grams, my Mulefut rims are in the 830 g/rim range, so might be lighter by a little, hopefully more. I'm already into summer vs winter tire season. Fruita is an hour away and dry and rideable, but snow's still coming here and studs are a must right now. I'm tired of swapping tires. Pics and weights soon (I hope).
    damn, I want a pair now. Been thinking of making a move like this for the mayor this year. what width are the hubs?

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    150 and 197

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    EB14: Turnagain Components Launches New FR 100 Fat Bike Rims, New Hubs - Bikerumor

    411 on the 100mm rims that I found. Does not help in the 65mm question
    but all I could find....

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    Hello I work for Borealis Fat Bikes and just wanted to address some of the posts above. We are a small company (7 employees) but we do a large volume of sales and sell bikes that we are very proud of. When you only have a limited number of manpower you have to decide what the priority is and weighing all of our parts while on the list obviously comes after processing sales, handling warranties, going to events, etc. We just went live with our online store a couple of months ago and so we are working to get a specs page up and provide the information customers are looking for but it takes time.

    We appreciate the customer feedback, and are doing our best to provide the customer service you deserve. Stay tuned for an updated webstore as well as a specification page. Thanks.

    Front FTD65 wheel is 2lbs 8oz by the way.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by lagocza View Post
    Hello I work for Borealis Fat Bikes and just wanted to address some of the posts above. We are a small company (7 employees) but we do a large volume of sales and sell bikes that we are very proud of. When you only have a limited number of manpower you have to decide what the priority is and weighing all of our parts while on the list obviously comes after processing sales, handling warranties, going to events, etc. We just went live with our online store a couple of months ago and so we are working to get a specs page up and provide the information customers are looking for but it takes time.

    We appreciate the customer feedback, and are doing our best to provide the customer service you deserve. Stay tuned for an updated webstore as well as a specification page. Thanks.

    Front FTD65 wheel is 2lbs 8oz by the way.
    Sweet - thanks for the feedback. Any chance you guys have some pictures of the bead seat and cross section of the FTD65?
    Now quit screwing around on the internet and go build my wheels!

    Edit: this should come in around 5 oz. lighter than my mulefut/novatec D201sb build. I can live with that.

    Edit #2: ordered yesterday morning, shipping out today - Wahoo.
    Last edited by watermonkey; 03-02-2016 at 03:02 PM.
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  19. #19
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    Thanks for the reply. Does the FTD65 front weight that you quote include the tubeless rim strip and valve? Thanks again!

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    The weight is for the complete wheel only, does not include the weight of the tape, valve and strip. Thanks.

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    Thanks for the input, @lagocza.

    I'm curious/hopeful about the possibility of a 650b version of this rim. Have you guys thought about producing one, since you already have the extrusion? (I don't really know, but I assume that's the bulk of the expense?)

    As I mentioned above, there is a glaring need for such a rim, which should only grow in the coming years. Trek/Bontrager is taking the lead with 650b fat tires, and presumably others will jump in at some point. But, for some reason, they've completely dropped the ball in terms of producing the rims that we actually need to leverage the tires to their optimum potential. (Something that gives the tire a versatile, good-for-summer/dry-trail use profile, and/or offers a little weight savings for someone who doesn't need the flotation of a wider rim in the winter.)

    Trek has an 80mm-ish alloy rim that's way too wide for their 650b Hodag tire (tire too square) and, conversely, there are a couple of 50mm-ish alloy plus-sized rims out there that are too narrow (tire too round). 60-65 seems like it would be the sweet spot but, unless someone wants expensive, disposable, craptastic plastic, they're out of luck.

    Food for thought, if nothing else....
    We still hang bike thieves in Wyoming [Pedal House]

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    They're here. Beadlock/shelf looks almost identical to the Mulefut. Same holes in bead shelf all the way to the edge, just like the Mulefut, so full tape is going to be key for tubeless, but the tape provided looks perfect. Weight rear 1294g, front 1160g, both naked.
    Borealis 65mm wheelset?-borealis-1.jpg
    Borealis 65mm wheelset?-borealis-3.jpg
    I would advise not taking my advice.

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    Are end caps available to make the 135x15 into a 135 QR.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bentpushrod View Post
    Are end caps available to make the 135x15 into a 135 QR.
    We have never had a bike with a QR front so we do not have endcaps to convert it unfortunately. Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    Sweet - thanks for the feedback. Any chance you guys have some pictures of the bead seat and cross section of the FTD65?
    Now quit screwing around on the internet and go build my wheels!

    Edit: this should come in around 5 oz. lighter than my mulefut/novatec D201sb build. I can live with that.

    Edit #2: ordered yesterday morning, shipping out today - Wahoo.
    That is great, 2 days and you got rims already- they look great !

    Now I ordered a Flume bike with the 100 mm, Bud/Lou, and a extra set of
    65 mm, on Monday night, they got the orders first thing Tuesday
    and just asked for a update, and nothing has been built yet....

    Anyone else got their rim orders ?

    BTW, I ordered a set of the super light Kenda Juggernauts 26X4.0 Pro,
    eBay, for $105 shipped, matched to these 65 rims, a super value
    in a light summer hardpack set up. $404 for a rim and tire set up
    like this is a steal.

  26. #26
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    Tubeless setup fails

    Setting these up tubeless is totally kicking my a$$. So far, I haven't been successful. Here's the breakdown.
    Tires tried; 72 TPI Snowshoe, 120 TPI Snowshoe, Lou.
    Tubeless methods - Supplied tape (see image above), split tube, plastic wrap, Goriila Wide clear tape (correct width by the way).
    Tubes - q tubes 26 x 2.4- 2.75 (not superlight - didn't have any on hand) fill the tire perfectly - no need for true fat tubes on the 65mm rim - for summer pressures anyway.

    Notes on the rim - noticeable imperfections in the entire circumference, not damaged, just a function of the manufacturing, I think. Rim 1 mm wider at pinned seam than rest of the wheel, but not that big of a deal, seems round and true. Bead shelves are holy mother [email protected]#$%$#$ tight! We're talking 40+ psi to seat bead with a ridiculous amount of soapy water (high school car wash amounts of soapy water) tight. I took to wearing safety glasses and earmuffs to deaden the sound when (not if) the beads blew. The beads are so tight, in fact, that sometimes the seated bead would blow off before the other bead could seat, that kind of tight. ON the plus side, because the channel is so deep, its much much easier to mount and pull tires. It still requires standing on the bead to get it off the bead seat, but once that's done, pretty simple - this means that field tube swaps are doable, but I'm not sure what would happen when it came time to re-seat the bead - maybe a tire that's been mounted for a while will go.


    Method #1 - Tubeless kit that came with the wheels - Tape and valves. While I initially thought the tape was going to be the right fit, as it fit perfectly between the rim walls (same as my Mulefeets and their respective tape), the cross section of the wheel is way deeper than the Mulefut profile. so once the tape conforms to this trough, it it pulls away from the bead shelf, making it useless. It takes two wraps overlapped laterally to actually cover the rim correctly, but this puts the seam right about at the bead shelf - useless and a waste of tape. Tried anyway, sealant leakage and failure, couldn't initially get the bead to seat, blew a bead off, and ruined the tape job in the process of breaking the set bead to inspect damage. Summary - supplied kit useless.

    Method #2 - Split tube - airs up fine, bead shelf so freaking tight with tube now in there, that seating beads was a terrifying ordeal, potential tire damaging pressures to seat, then once seated, blew off the bead at a resting 14 psi. Not sure why, maybe the bead got over stretched in the mounting process - however, I used the same tire later with tube to no issues, so the bead wasn't destroyed, and still popped on.

    Method #3 - cling wrap - 5 layers - not a chance. Bead shelf is sooooo tight the tire bead ate right through it when it popped into place - homebrew sealant carnage everywhere, AND a bead blew off (different tire than before) at a resting 15 psi. Not an option.

    Method #4 - Gorilla tough and wide packing tape 2.83 inches wide. This might hold the most promising for width, but will take skill in laying it down perfect. Once it conforms to the rim channel, it covers width to width and just comes up the rim wall on each side, but not all the way. Tough to lay down without creases in the bead shelf and got some leaking through these. I'm also not confident on the resistance to sealant and the end of the wrap. This process failed, and when I dismounted the tire, I already had some sealant leaking under the end of the tape wrap - not confidence inspiring. Leaking came from a crease in the bead shelf due to poor tape laydown, and also from around the valve. Supplied valves don't seem to seal well against the contours on the inner rim right where the valve hole is (and this is with a spacer nut under the locking nut - it might take a different valve, like a DT swiss or American classic.

    Method #5 - Q tubes - still took a crapload of psi's on a soapy rim to seat the beads, but haven't blown a bead with this method.

    Summary - nothing works tubeless yet. I think tubeless specific tape the correct width may solve the problems, but finding that might be an issue. Regular wide gorilla tape might be easier to lay down, but I'm not a fan of the adhesive it leaves behind, and it soaks up sealant anyway. Superlight Q tubes with some sealant might be the way I ultimate go - these are summer wheels, and I'm less concerned about pinch flats than in the winter with tubes - thorns not an issue in most of my riding world.

    Here's a pic of a difference between my winter (Bud/Lou Mulefut tubeless), and summer (Snowshoe 120 TPI, on the 65mm Borealis- tubed). Snowshoes are measuring about 3.6" wide at 12 psi, so lowfat or ++ range. Just the difference in circumference alone is going to make it zippier.
    Borealis 65mm wheelset?-bud-snowshoe.jpg
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  27. #27
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    In my experience, tape doesn't need to go to the bead shelf. On my current rims the tape only covers the spoke holes, and doesn't even come close to the rim wall.

    I may have misunderstood the issue, though.

    What are you using for a rim strip again?

  28. #28
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    Tubeless noob here, first fat bike and spare rims on the way from Borealis.

    Maybe defective rim ? Sounds simplistic, but could that be the case ?

    I ordered some kits from Fattystripper, maybe that will help me set
    mine up. Sounds like OP is not new to tubeless set ups, so has
    me wondering how my first tubeless set up will go.....
    I thought about getting some Q tubes to run a few days to break tires in
    and test everything out, now doing that for sure.

    I have Bud/Lou and Juffernaut Pro 4.0 on the way for the 100mm and
    65 mm wheelsets on the way, crossing my fingers !

  29. #29
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    Success? Maybe. Went with homemade ghetto latex strippy setup - akin to fatty stripper. Nope, not going into how to do it, but fattystripper may be the way to go with these. Set the strip, set the valve, mounted the tire, and aired up with air compressor - with the valve core in. Super simple. Its still a little disturbing how much pressure it takes to seat these beads, but its working.
    Borealis 65mm wheelset?-fat-latex-strip.jpg

    Edit - So I also set the rear wheel up ghetto fatty stripper last night. Both front and rear held full pressure, verified with gauge, overnight without any sealant in them. I figure I'll add 2-3 oz anyway, but so far I'm sold. I tried the ghetto fatty stripper with success before Fatty Stripper was even around, but was using it on crappy Weinmann's that suck at low psi's anyway, so never stuck with it. I think I'm sold now.

    FYI - In the attempt at setting these up before, I did roast a tire. The bead is now overstretched for tubeless use, but seats OK with a tube - not sure I trust it though. As I stated before, these are crazy tight to seat the beads. Even with soapy water, 303, sealant and windex, its is frightening the psi's it takes. Potentially tire damaging psi's. Its funny, the wheel box came with a little baggie with a warning in it stating that soapy water must be used as the tubeless rims are really tight, and that Borealis is not responsible for rim or tire damage during mounting - I think we now know why these wheels are on such huge discount. I don't expect anything from Borealis, and accept my role in damaging the tire bead. I suspected as much going in, it is a huge discount, and now that I have a tubeless solution, I think these are going to be a blast. I hope all this info helps someone.
    Last edited by watermonkey; 03-08-2016 at 07:53 AM.
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  30. #30
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    One important thing is to go ride the wheels right after setting them to help stretch and set the bead. I try to schedule my tubeless-mountings with rides.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  31. #31
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    I wonder if the new 80mm tubeless ready wheelset is the same design than the 65mm?
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  32. #32
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    It sounds like they're the same, but the local Borealis dealer hadn't seen any of these rims yet, so I can't confirm. So far, the front is holding air perfect with the ghetto fatty stripper, but the rear failed (my fault). I'm going to try another route - since these are a similiar width (give or take) of Marge Lites, I'm going to try the clownshoe rim strip method. It sounds like the perfect solution - an probably how every tubeless cutout rim should work...pure simplicity.
    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/tub...rk-895718.html

    Edit: Yep, Clownshoe rim strips over the supplied borealis strips, American Classic valves (not the ones supplied), 2 oz. homebrew sealant, perfect. This IS how every tubeless rim w/cuttouts should set up. So very, very easy. See the marge lite post - just like that. For those of you that get these rims, I strongly, strongly encourage you to mount your tires with a ridiculous amount of soapy water and tubes and let them sit/stretch for a day before going the tubeless route. Hope this helps.
    Last edited by watermonkey; 03-18-2016 at 12:45 PM.
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  33. #33
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    Borealis 65mm Tubeless (challenges for me too) & anybody need weights?

    Having the same exact issues with my tubeless set up. Sun Ringle tape that worked awesome with my MuleFuts didn't hold. OEM tape was a no go as well. Fatty Strippers next. This is getting old. On the bright side the hubs roll really well.

    Weights on the 65mm tubeless wheelset:
    Front without strip is 1124 grams
    Rear withour strip is 1258 grams
    Strips are 59 grams


    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    Success? Maybe. Went with homemade ghetto latex strippy setup - akin to fatty stripper. Nope, not going into how to do it, but fattystripper may be the way to go with these. Set the strip, set the valve, mounted the tire, and aired up with air compressor - with the valve core in. Super simple. Its still a little disturbing how much pressure it takes to seat these beads, but its working.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	fat latex strip.jpg 
Views:	313 
Size:	226.2 KB 
ID:	1055156

    Edit - So I also set the rear wheel up ghetto fatty stripper last night. Both front and rear held full pressure, verified with gauge, overnight without any sealant in them. I figure I'll add 2-3 oz anyway, but so far I'm sold. I tried the ghetto fatty stripper with success before Fatty Stripper was even around, but was using it on crappy Weinmann's that suck at low psi's anyway, so never stuck with it. I think I'm sold now.

    FYI - In the attempt at setting these up before, I did roast a tire. The bead is now overstretched for tubeless use, but seats OK with a tube - not sure I trust it though. As I stated before, these are crazy tight to seat the beads. Even with soapy water, 303, sealant and windex, its is frightening the psi's it takes. Potentially tire damaging psi's. Its funny, the wheel box came with a little baggie with a warning in it stating that soapy water must be used as the tubeless rims are really tight, and that Borealis is not responsible for rim or tire damage during mounting - I think we now know why these wheels are on such huge discount. I don't expect anything from Borealis, and accept my role in damaging the tire bead. I suspected as much going in, it is a huge discount, and now that I have a tubeless solution, I think these are going to be a blast. I hope all this info helps someone.

  34. #34
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    Ride report - I've got several rides on these now and am pretty happy with them. The 65mm is definitely quicker handling than my Mulefuts, tubeless with the exact same tires. Very fun summer ride. The Clownshoe rim strips have been working perfectly with the american classic valves. The above image shows the front wheel set up ghetto fatty stripper tubeless. This set up well and held air perfectly - so fatty strippers are definitely a viable option for these. That being said, I removed this setup before heading out to Loma so that both front and back were setup with the Clownshoe strips, and I'm happy I did...here's why. I've picked up small thorns many times in the past that sealed fine with Stan's/homebrew. This time I picked up a really big nail, and sealant would not stop this leak once the nail was pulled. I had to install a tube, and then and there I realized I was glad I wasn't running the fatty strippers. All I had to do was pull the american classic valve, drop in a tube, and away I went. The clownshoe strip stayed exactly where it needs to be once I go to set up tubeless again. The fatty stripper would've been a sloppy PITA to remove, as they glue themselves to the tires. IF you could've removed the stripper without tearing it, they're still all wrinkled and floppy. Clownshoe strips FTW. So, in summary, solid wheels that rode well and added some agility and nimbleness back to the dirt riding personality of my fatty. I like the POE of the hub fine, and I had a really good time on them. I will definitely be riding with a tubeless plug repair kit in the future, would've saved me a lot of work in the field.

    On another note - now that the tires have been mounted for a few weeks, it only took 28 psi to seat the beads this time. so I think the tire beads stretched some, and they are now more easily serviceable in the field.
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  35. #35
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    Ditto on fatty strippers

    Ditto on success with these wheels via fatty strippers. Really curious how to make ghetto fatty strippers.


    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    Ride report - I've got several rides on these now and am pretty happy with them. The 65mm is definitely quicker handling than my Mulefuts, tubeless with the exact same tires. Very fun summer ride. The Clownshoe rim strips have been working perfectly with the american classic valves. The above image shows the front wheel set up ghetto fatty stripper tubeless. This set up well and held air perfectly - so fatty strippers are definitely a viable option for these. That being said, I removed this setup before heading out to Loma so that both front and back were setup with the Clownshoe strips, and I'm happy I did...here's why. I've picked up small thorns many times in the past that sealed fine with Stan's/homebrew. This time I picked up a really big nail, and sealant would not stop this leak once the nail was pulled. I had to install a tube, and then and there I realized I was glad I wasn't running the fatty strippers. All I had to do was pull the american classic valve, drop in a tube, and away I went. The clownshoe strip stayed exactly where it needs to be once I go to set up tubeless again. The fatty stripper would've been a sloppy PITA to remove, as they glue themselves to the tires. IF you could've removed the stripper without tearing it, they're still all wrinkled and floppy. Clownshoe strips FTW. So, in summary, solid wheels that rode well and added some agility and nimbleness back to the dirt riding personality of my fatty. I like the POE of the hub fine, and I had a really good time on them. I will definitely be riding with a tubeless plug repair kit in the future, would've saved me a lot of work in the field.

    On another note - now that the tires have been mounted for a few weeks, it only took 28 psi to seat the beads this time. so I think the tire beads stretched some, and they are now more easily serviceable in the field.

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