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  1. #1
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    Best pedals for snow

    I currently live in a ski town in Colorado. The majority of my rides are in soft to firm snow. I am currently riding SPD's and winter MTB boots. I am getting snow in the pedals and around the cleats and its been a real drag to clip in. Any recommendations for pedals? I would like to be clipped in so that's a factor. Time?, Crank bros? thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Rippin da fAt
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    I'm running Straitline Defacto due to the large number of traction pins. There are two rows of pins along the spindle line that offer traction under the ball of the foot as well as the pins along the perimeter. A total of 14 pins per side make the pedals viable. The best part is choosing between insulated boots and
    5 10 Guide tennies which are my bike ride go to for the most part.

    SPD and I are the equivalent of laser epidermal resection while I ride.
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  3. #3
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    Time ATAC. They clear easily and rarely have problems.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshthedoc1 View Post
    I currently live in a ski town in Colorado. The majority of my rides are in soft to firm snow. I am currently riding SPD's and winter MTB boots. I am getting snow in the pedals and around the cleats and its been a real drag to clip in. Any recommendations for pedals? I would like to be clipped in so that's a factor. Time?, Crank bros? thanks in advance
    You can run SPD's all winter. I give my pedals and cleats a good coating of a wax based lubricant (Boesield T-9) and have never had a problem in years. I ride in wet, cold, very challenging conditions 3-6 days a week in the winter.

    I've found that two things help. One thoroughly coating your cleats and pedals 1-2 times per season, and avoiding walking out of the house with nice warm 70 degree cleats and stepping right into the snow. This will obviously cause a lot of water/ice on your cleats and you haven't even started riding.

    The second thing I do is knock my shoe against my crank arm before every restart. Depending on the moisture content of the snow, the temperature, and your shoe there will be a certain amount of snow stuck to your shoe after you put your foot down. Clanking it against the crank arm before you clip in will keep you from having any issues with ice build up on the cleats.

    Only one time before I learned a couple tricks did I have ice build up on my cleats to the point where it was a problem. It was a perfect trifecta of conditions and my lack of experience. A squirt of water from my luke warm water bottle quickly solved my problem and I learned how to avoid that in the future.

    Bottom line is there's nothing wrong with SPD's in the winter.
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  5. #5
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    Laser epidermal resection? You must really love SPD's! I am assuming without a local anesthetic?

  6. #6
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    Thanks Onespeed. That sounds good, I'll try the T-9 before I start going on the never ending financial quest of finding the perfect snow pedal.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshthedoc1 View Post
    Thanks Onespeed. That sounds good, I'll try the T-9 before I start going on the never ending financial quest of finding the perfect snow pedal.
    That's just what I use, an oil based chain lube might work just as well? You get the concept though.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  8. #8
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    In addition to 1speeds suggestions you should try to get a good insulative barrier (insole) between your foot and the cleat. Serves 2 purposes, keeps your foot warmer and keeps the cleat colder, not melting the snow forming ice.

  9. #9
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    I don't have the snow packing problems in Alaska, it's not much colder, but I suspect the snow temp is usually less, the ground likes to stay cold here. What I've noticed is when it gets up to the 30 and gets slushy, it can pack SPD cleats like crazy. Probably because your heat-sink cleat is colder than the snow and it "freezes" to it. The newer SPD design that is "open" is much better than the old 737 design and stomping can usually make it work, but the culprit is the conditions IME, not so much the pedal. Now, maybe something does work a lot better to reduce this, most that use CB and Times report better mud clearance, I have a set of times for ultra-cold conditions because of their use of composite, but I haven't tried them in soupy snow.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  10. #10
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    Like Jayem, I'm in Alaska. I've had the best luck with the Time pedals for clearing snow/ice. I will say that the main problem I have had over the years has been with the cleat receptacle on the boots packing up with snow/ice. I have a pair of 45Nrth Wolvhammer (4-5 year old design) that are really susceptible to clogging up, especially when it warms up. I think the newer versions have a larger cleat receptacle. An older pair of Lake boots I have cleared pretty good (better than the 45Nrth). I am using Specialized Defrosters this year and they have been the best at clearing snow (but not quite as warm as the 45Nrth). I guess I am saying the pedals and boots are a system and should be considered together, depending on conditions, insulation needs, etc...IMO.

  11. #11
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    in the snowmobile world. some guys spray pam on there rear suspensions to prevent ice and snow from building up. it might worth a try.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshthedoc1 View Post
    I currently live in a ski town in Colorado. The majority of my rides are in soft to firm snow. I am currently riding SPD's and winter MTB boots. I am getting snow in the pedals and around the cleats and its been a real drag to clip in. Any recommendations for pedals? I would like to be clipped in so that's a factor. Time?, Crank bros? thanks in advance
    Iíve likely run one of every generation of SPDs since their inception WAY back when. Like you, however, I found them difficult to manage in a variety of snow conditions.

    I now run Crank Brothers Mallet-E(nduro) pedals on the fatbike in the winter. They have an much more open design and I virtually never have a problem with the pedals clogging up. I also like the large platform in case I miss clipping in on a sketchy section. I definitely prefer the feel of the release on the SPDs but itís a small compromise. One tip: get the zero float clear option which allows for a much quicker release and feels similar to the SPDs in terms of rotation necessary to exit the pedal.

    Time pedals are also excellent in the snow and a few of my buddies run them. I found the spring tension higher than I liked on the Times personally but theyíre great winter pedals too for sure.

  13. #13
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    Speedplay Frog

    No mechanism , doesn't clog in snow/mud.
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  14. #14
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    I hated the SPD's since the day they were invented. Just did not work for me, after thousands of miles on Look style cleats.

    Crank bro Candys year round did the trick for me.

  15. #15
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    Crank Bros Candy pedals haven't ever let me down. I'd recommend the Candy 7 pedals, as they're the least expensive version that have CB's "Integrated traction pad technology to optimize the shoe/pedal interface." The traction pads work well, IMO.Best pedals for snow-screenshot_2019-01-02-14-06-10.jpg

  16. #16
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    +1 on Crank Brothers.

  17. #17
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    We the people ...

    Time ATACs here.

    And (I'm showing my age by posting this) on particularly wet rides, I spray my pedals and frame with Pam (non stick cooking spray). If your boots are collecting ice, they may not be insulated well enough. It may be worthwhile to upgade the sole/inserts. I upgraded my winter boots to off-brand Uggs wool foot beds (@ $15-20 on Amazon). Love them and added and extra 20F+ of cold weather performance to my boots.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bingemtbr View Post
    Time ATACs here.

    And (I'm showing my age by posting this) on particularly wet rides, I spray my pedals and frame with Pam (non stick cooking spray). If your boots are collecting ice, they may not be insulated well enough. It may be worthwhile to upgade the sole/inserts. I upgraded my winter boots to off-brand Uggs wool foot beds (@ $15-20 on Amazon). Love them and added and extra 20F+ of cold weather performance to my boots.
    Times are a good choice if you like the Crank Brothers style of entry/retention/exit and want durable pedals.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bingemtbr View Post
    Time ATACs here.

    And (I'm showing my age by posting this) on particularly wet rides, I spray my pedals and frame with Pam (non stick cooking spray). If your boots are collecting ice, they may not be insulated well enough. It may be worthwhile to upgade the sole/inserts. I upgraded my winter boots to off-brand Uggs wool foot beds (@ $15-20 on Amazon). Love them and added and extra 20F+ of cold weather performance to my boots.
    My experience has not been the lack of insulation in the foot bed, but the poor cleat receptacle design, as I mentioned previously. It was mostly problematic when the temperature would warm up (~32F). I have had very few issues in colder temps. The reason I mention it is because I have seen/heard riders talking about their pedals packing with snow/ice, when in reality their cleat receptacles were the main culprit.

  20. #20
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    Crank Brothers Candy 1 - all year round.

  21. #21
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    Flats only.
    That way I can wear proper boots. I find my feet freeze in an hour when it's below -20.

  22. #22
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    We use Crank Bros Mallets all year long, my bike has Mallet 3 and my son's Mallet E, the main difference is that the Es have a hollow body making them even better in snow.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiRt DeViL View Post
    We use Crank Bros Mallets all year long, my bike has Mallet 3 and my son's Mallet E, the main difference is that the Es have a hollow body making them even better in snow.
    Iíve run Mallet Es for a couple seasons and a few thousand miles in all kinds of snow. They work well with my regular mtb shoes, with an over shoe, and with my wolvhammers. The platform has been great when fighting to get started in deeper snow or downhill sliding corners where Iím in and out and like the unclipped option.

    My generic favorite year round pedals. I do race XC on egg beaters but at times still miss the platform extra weight be damned.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
    in the snowmobile world. some guys spray pam on there rear suspensions to prevent ice and snow from building up. it might worth a try.
    Also painted tunnels have helped a ton.

    If you get painted pedals like issi and powder coated cleats would help alot too.




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