Best allround tire for autumn/winter use- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Nor­wegr
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    Best allround tire for autumn/winter use

    I realise there probably isn't a perfect answer for this, but the closer I get the better because I can only afford one set of tires this season

    Recently purchased a new bluto-equipped fatbike to replace my old one, it's delivered with Jumbo Jim 4.0 liteskins. Good tires, but I want 4.8s with a grippier pattern. I've only ridden JJ, OnOne Floaters, Dillinger 4 and dreadful Innova Spyders before so I don't have alot to go by. I do have a 2XL, but I ended up with a different bike than planned so it probably won't fit.

    Intended use:
    Rainy autumn days
    Winter and snow

    I don't ride when there's ice so spikes aren't really needed, rolling resistance is also a non-issue. More exercise that way

    Any suggestions?
    Last edited by Vegard; 09-04-2016 at 08:56 AM.

  2. #2
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    Surly Bud and Lou

  3. #3
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    Snow any of these tires work well. A more aggressive tire like the bud and Lou is great for loose snow and the Dillinger is great for packed days. 45NRTH has the best runner in my option for fall riding and gripping wet roots and rocks. Most fatbike tires use cheap
    firm durometer rubber. The surly tires use a 60a rubber, Schwalbe uses the pace star compound on the jumbo jims. Vee uses a decent rubber that is high silica and somewhere like a 52a compound. 45NRTH uses a similar rubber to this and they grip great. Maxxis also uses there dual compound rubber 55a/60a and the 55a rubber helps the side knobs stick better.


    Too many companies and riders are use to crap fatbike tires that use hard tire compounds. Doesn't matter how low the air pressure is in the tire, if the tire uses a 60a rubber you are leaving traction on the table in terms of roots and rocks in the fall. Last year I went for riding nice 3c minion tires on my trail bike to bud and Lou tires and it made me realize how bad that rubber is in the wet

  4. #4
    turtles make me hot
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    Another vote for Bud and Lou. Great for snow.
    I like turtles

  5. #5
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    Lou ft and back if rolling resistance isn't an issue. The sidewalls hold up well at low pressure and they have tall knobs that grip to mud and snow like no other 4.8 tire. The rubber is slightly harder than other newer tires but I have never been left wanting for traction.

  6. #6
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    With packed trails that I ride here, I really like Bud and Bud.

  7. #7
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    There is more to tire design than just Durometer; knob size/height/pattern/type, casing size/flexibility, etc all play a role. Case in point, the Snowshoe XL was one of the worst snow tires I've tried. Despite having a better Durometer than others, snow sticks to the rubber in many conditions effectively turning the mediocre knob pattern into a slick. Even when they are exposed the knobs really don't help you do anything but go in a straight line.

    My favorites for winter riding are the 4.8" Bud/Lou and the 4" Vanhelgas. I've heard great things about the Flow/Dunderbeists as well, but haven't tried a set yet.
    '17 Cutthroat
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  8. #8
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    Bud/Bud has become my favorite tire combo. Year round.

  9. #9
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    Where do you live? Nothing beats studded fat tires in the winter if you ride on any kind of frozen (read: snow) surface.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  10. #10
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    Bud and Lou. Or Bud/Bud. For autumn.
    I have now Bud at front and JJ 4.8 SS at rear. It's okay combo also.

    In winter i need spikes. I have studded Bud/Lou for winter, i like them a lot.

    And soon i'll get my new fat, it has 2XL PSC installed. I think i give them a try also.
    Life, Love & The Blues. And Fatbiking.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiantTurd View Post
    I have using Maxxis Colossus 4.8 and has lasted a year and still looks great and has very good rolling and grip.
    Colossus is truly one i have to test someday. I've heard good things about it.
    Life, Love & The Blues. And Fatbiking.

  12. #12
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    My bad weather bike has Bud/Bud combo, and works well. If you are willing to compromise and use a good all terrain 4" tire, the Nates are hard to beat.

    Sometimes new stuff is better, sometimes new stuff is just different.

  13. #13
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    I use Nates for my all-around fall/winter tire.

    I have ridden in up to 7" of fresh snow with them. They're good and grippy for leafy fall trails. Fairly open tread that doesn't pack up. For winter riding on my local trails, studs aren't necessary, even though they might help on some conditions. Usually, frozen trails here don't stay frozen consistently. There are a LOT of freeze/thaw cycles, so even while the surface may be icy, it's not smooth glare ice. Any aggressive knobby works pretty well.

  14. #14
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    I've only ridden five different tires and surprisingly none have been Surly but my 4.8 JJ Liteskins are my favorite so far.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rentalrider View Post
    I've only ridden five different tires and surprisingly none have been Surly but my 4.8 JJ Liteskins are my favorite so far.
    What tire pressures do you typically run? Some riders have mentioned noticing some self steer with JJs at "lower" pressures. Any thoughts on that?

  16. #16
    blood in / blood out
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    For me, the best combo would be dual Vanhelga's. But I like to run a larger tire in the front so I run a Jug Pro 4.5 up front and a JJ 4.0 SS in the back for spring - fall. And for winter tread, I run a Flowbeist up front and a Vanhelga in the back. I think for where I ride and live, I like having summer tread and winter tread. Each set of tires has a different purpose for different seasons and dirt or snow.
    RICOH for LIFE
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  17. #17
    Nor­wegr
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Where do you live? Nothing beats studded fat tires in the winter if you ride on any kind of frozen (read: snow) surface.
    Northern Norway, I had studded dillinger 4s one season and it didn't seem to be any better or worse than the floaters. What I find the most fun is riding after snowfall in deep powder. Icy hardpack isn't as much fun to me so I'll probably do fine without another studded set.

    Even though the first snow has allready fallen on the tallest nearby mountain, it's going to be another month or two before it hits sealevel, might hold out with the JJs until black friday sales roll around.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by FitmanNJ View Post
    What tire pressures do you typically run? Some riders have mentioned noticing some self steer with JJs at "lower" pressures. Any thoughts on that?
    I'm 6'1", 235# and run around 8 during spring-fall, around 4-5 snow. I feel self-steer is improved over most that I've run actually, however when I drop to snow pressures I rarely am riding aggressively. FWIW I'm tubeless, now, too.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vegard View Post
    Northern Norway, I had studded dillinger 4s one season and it didn't seem to be any better or worse than the floaters. What I find the most fun is riding after snowfall in deep powder. Icy hardpack isn't as much fun to me so I'll probably do fine without another studded set.

    Even though the first snow has allready fallen on the tallest nearby mountain, it's going to be another month or two before it hits sealevel, might hold out with the JJs until black friday sales roll around.
    Well, here in Anchorage we use studded fat tires not because we ride on ice so much, in fact, they aren't that great on ice compared to narrow studded tires, but because we like to ride all the time, over all frozen surfaces. On packed snow it's like running normal summer tires, where you can actually lean into the turns, rather than have the bike slide out from under you, like most people experience with non-studded winter tires. And of course when it does get to be hard-pack, they still work. Deep powder? Yep, I feel like (compared to floaters I had too) the studs are tiny claws that increase the surface area of your tires significantly, helping even in deep powder. As another example, one year I did a DH race on the ski slopes on the floaters, another year I did it with the studded D5s. The brakes were absolutely amazing with the D5s, it was like throwing on thrust reversers (we were hitting peak speeds above 55mph). That huge difference could only come from the traction. Braking down steep chutes/downhills at slower speeds? Way better control with studs.

    Of course, D4s aren't all that wide, and then D4s on rims 80mm or narrower are going to get pretty skinny, so you'd be missing a lot of float. I've spent two seasons on studded D5s and love it. It was like turning on a light comparatively, where all of a sudden I could go out and ride any condition at any time. At the least, I would suggest a good fat studded tire, it makes no sense to me to not have studs if you are primarily on frozen surfaces of some kind. Even when the snow is low and there are bare sections that are either frosted over or just things like frozen roots, those studs make all the difference in the world as far as bike handling.

    Of course, if one is on relatively narrow 80mm or less rims, that could also be a big contributor, if you like to ride in the powder. Most of the people that race here will get set up on ~80mm rims with studded D4s, as in 98% or so, but as fast as this combo is and as good as it is for the more packed stuff (as races tend to be), it misses a lot of float and cush for the softer stuff. 90-100mm is still king here, and with some pretty light carbon offerings, you can do it without sacrificing any significant weight, again, important if you want to ride the deeper stuff.

    I'm a huge advocate for the studs in the winter, as you can tell, most everyone rides with them here and there just isn't any reason not to, they don't make you slower, they increase control on all frozen surfaces, they let you keep riding if it gets icy, if you encounter unplanned overflow (that just happens and there's no way to predict), etc.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by rentalrider View Post
    I'm 6'1", 235# and run around 8 during spring-fall, around 4-5 snow. I feel self-steer is improved over most that I've run actually, however when I drop to snow pressures I rarely am riding aggressively. FWIW I'm tubeless, now, too.
    I guess that since the 4.8 JJ Liteskins have been your recent favorites, the self-steer you've been seeing must be pretty negligible. Thanks for responding!

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