Arctic Race - Battery Packs & Handwarmers?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    197

    Arctic Race - Battery Packs & Handwarmers?

    Previously posted in Bikepacking and Adventure board, no replies so thought fatbikers might be able to offer some advice?

    I'm doing my first arctic race at Rovaniemi in February where expected temperatures are -10 to -20 celcius. Planning to need lights for up to 17 hours and know that battery packs work better when warm. One option is to use body heat, but it's quite a big lump to carry. I was thinking whether anyone had tried using a chemical handwarmer to keep a battery pack warm?

  2. #2
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    31,649
    I haven't had problems with quality lights working in those temps. For cheap Chinese lights, sure. I have put a chem pack on my camera before, but you can also put it in a pocket close to your body. I supposed I'd want to test run time first?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    197
    Thanks Jayem for your reply - the advice about cold-effect on batteries came from a reputable manufacturer with an assumption is that at -20C you have only 50% of battery capacity. Being in southern England, we're having an unseasonally warm and wet winter - we've had no winter frosts so no chance of trying it out for real. I have a spare battery so might try sticking the light in the freezer for a few hours!

  4. #4
    Laramie, Wyoming
    Reputation: alphazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,941
    17 hours at those temps is a long time even though they aren't extreme temps. Dovebiker, you didn't mention the lights you are planning on using or the lumens you are going to try to use for that long. I rode at those temps yesterday with two others. All of us had brought our phones but I was the only one who had their phone in a "heated" pouch. I have all of my electrical stuff in a pouch on top of my Bar Yak. I threw in two chemical heaters and my phone was the only one that worked a couple of hours into the ride.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    507
    If you use a light with a remote battery pack you can put the battery pack in your pogies that does pretty good. When it gets colder you can put a hand warmer in with it and get double duty out of it. Keep your battery and your hands warm.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    423
    Son dyno hub would be the lightest and most reliable option. I would also bring a backup light as well.

    Remember that white snow reflects light much better than dark trails. You might be able to get away with using a lower lumes light or mode to save on batteries.

    Either way I would highly recommend to practice in condition as close to what you will be going though before you go there. Could be life threatening if you make a mistake or have me mechanical failure

  7. #7
    Laramie, Wyoming
    Reputation: alphazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,941
    Yes, the dyno hub would be the best solution if you had the money. You have enough time but you would have to get going on it. I have the Son dyno hub and it's nice because it takes the worries out of wondering about batteries. Winter includes a lot of night riding and a lot of riding that ends up being in the dark. The dyno hub allows you ride without any concern over light. As a bonus, you can ride all day and your bike computer is still fully charged.

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    31,649
    Yeah put the remote battery pack in your pocket or something. I do recall on a few very cold rides where I left my phone in my pack, it discharged like halfway over just a few hours, but again, light battery has always been good in the same situation.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    91
    I have used hand warmers for years to keep camera battery's warm. Put the battery pack in an insulated case (OR bottle parka) with the hand warmer. You could test that in your freezer. Insulation R values are rated in a vacuum and disappear with air movement so make sure it is zipped up tight and stuffed with other insulating things. Hope this helps!

    Sent from my E2306 using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    347
    Just use a light that takes AA lithium batteries, and don't worry about the cold. -20c isn't that cold, just about any light will work at those temps.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    91
    I agree with spruceboy. My personal setup is to have two headlamps loaded with lithium AA's. Handy to have backup and not switch batteries in the dark..

    Sent from my E2306 using Tapatalk

Similar Threads

  1. Arctic Race - Battery Packs & Handwarmers?
    By dovebiker in forum Bikepacking and Bike Expedition
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-04-2016, 02:05 PM
  2. Chinese Light Battery Packs
    By NYrr496 in forum Lights DIY - Do It Yourself
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-23-2013, 06:45 PM
  3. Drivers attached to battery packs?
    By marpilli in forum Lights DIY - Do It Yourself
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-14-2012, 04:59 AM
  4. help finding alternative battery packs
    By nattyboh74 in forum Lights DIY - Do It Yourself
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 10-17-2011, 08:04 AM
  5. Help with DIY battery packs
    By mercman in forum Lights DIY - Do It Yourself
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-16-2011, 05:36 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.