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  1. #1
    since 4/10/2009
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    Anyone successfully plugged a hole in a tire like this?

    On my ride yesterday, less than a mile from the end, a root/stick punched a hole in my Surly Nates.

    It was a pretty good-sized stick, and blunt at the end that poked a hole in my tire. Pressure in the tire popped it right out, too.


    1024181648 by Nate, on Flickr

    I spun the tire in hopes that the sealant would get the hole patched, but no dice. It had worked in the past (on a sharper stick).

    I looked at the spot after all the tire pressure was gone, to see if it was worth messing with along the trail.

    I saw this hole:


    1024181741a by Nate, on Flickr

    and realized that it wasn't worth unmounting the tire, booting it, and installing a tube for less than a mile ride back. So I walked. But I'd like to try to patch it up and put it back into service if I can, since good fat tires are expensive, and I'm trying to build up a nice trail 29er. Unfortunately, there's a piece of rubber actually missing from the tire.

    Anyone had success with any sorts of repairs on something like this? I've got a few ideas floating around in my head before I give up and buy a new tire. For now, I'll be putting one of my old Husker Dus on, since I've got some rides planned within the next week. BTW, one of those HuDus is the one that had a similarly sized stick puncture the casing. That hole was patched with sealant only, and it's still holding just fine. That happened, oh, 2.5-3yrs ago or so.

  2. #2
    This place needs an enema
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    Glue a car tire patch inside, or sew it closed then blob some glue over that. Sewing usually = wobble in casing.

  3. #3
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    I am working on a similar "fix" for a Vanhelga with a similar size hole. I am hoping that placing a tube patch on the inside of the tire will work along with a dab of Shoe Gu to cover the outside of the hole. I am a bit concerned that another well placed stick could displace the patch.

  4. #4
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    I have cut a small piece of a plastic bottle to cover such a hole on the inside of the tire and backed it with some duct tape. That worked quite well honestly. I have not done this with a fat tire, but I had a sharp cut in the sidewall of a hutchison tire that I was able to keep riding afterwards until the tread wore out. Worked relatively well with a Schwalbe tire too. I found having something rigid to reinforce that area worked better than trying to plug it or back with a piece of tube and rubber cement. Not a pretty fix, but it worked for me. I did tube the tire after the "fix".

    I wouldn't use Shoe goo, I've used that stuff on several shoes and it doesn't work all that great. I had one pair of shoes that I kept cleaning and reapplying which worked for about a day every time. I would wait for 48 hours to use the shoes and one round of disc golf would destroy them again.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  5. #5
    since 4/10/2009
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    Car tire patch is a good idea.

    Think it would also be worth shoving a bit of tire plug into the hole with more extra glue?

    Sewing had crossed my mind. I've got a speedy stitcher that would make such a repair fairly easy. but given the missing rubber, I wanted to avoid pinching the casing together and getting a nasty wobble.

  6. #6
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    For clarification: by "tube patch", I meant a patch like you would use on a tube, not a patch made out of a tube.

    A vulcanizing automotive hot patch is probably the way to go.

  7. #7
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Had good luck a few times with dental floss and superglue.

    Went tubeless again, and no wobble.

    5", 4" AND 3" have been done too....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  8. #8
    EAT MORE GRIME
    Reputation: 127.0.0.1's Avatar
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    those old school vulcanizing patch kits --with the long patch--, that will do it
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    those old school vulcanizing patch kits --with the long patch--, that will do it
    I've been looking for stuff like the "vulcanizing automotive hot patch" that BlueCheesecake mentioned and I can't really find anything. It appears such things have been regulated away - I've seen mentions on car forums that those things produced some pretty toxic fumes. I'm able to find chemical vulcanizing cement pretty easily.

    https://www.amazon.com/Xtra-Seal-Che.../dp/B002PMRDTM
    https://www.amazon.com/Rema-Tip-Top-...RJRZM82XPD0NXH

    Unless what you're referring to is one of these:

    https://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-Vul.../dp/B07CPZS582

    And I've got a few of those.

  10. #10
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    I too looked for a hot patch kit. I found this:



    What they did not do that I would do is use a roller on the patch before removing the backing. I am not sure what the purpose of the bead sealer, final step is.

    Vulcanizing glue, patches, roller and bead sealer are all available at Amazon.

    I wonder how much of a mess bead sealer would be to use on a tubeless setup and it if would help.

  11. #11
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    I too looked for a hot patch kit. I found this:



    What they did not do that I would do is use a roller on the patch before removing the backing. I am not sure what the purpose of the bead sealer, final step is.

    Vulcanizing glue, patches, roller and bead sealer are all available at Amazon.

    I wonder how much of a mess bead sealer would be to use on a tubeless setup and it if would help.
    that's a bit more helpful. The stuff I was seeing that is no longer available were these all-in-one patches that had some sort of chemical heating system built in.

    I found the parts for this at various places, but didn't find this video in particular. the vids I did see used a press to accomplish the same as your roller method along with the heating. This method is something that'd be easy enough to do at home.

  12. #12
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    I'm on 26x4 tubeless and carry small plugs and the tool to insert them. Bike shops have them, they work great...
    cederic

    2017 Salsa Beargrease
    2012 Fuji Absolute 3.0 Road Bike
    Giant Roam X-Road - Sold it
    Giant CycloCross - Sold it

  13. #13
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    http://www.flexsealproducts.com

    No personal experience, but worth a shot?

    Yeah; the 'packaging' is all wrong to take along in the field.
    "Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway" John Wayne

  14. #14
    EAT MORE GRIME
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    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  15. #15
    fat guy on a little bike
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Glue a car tire patch inside
    i am with mike, i would use a car tire patch on the inside. There are lots of styles and thicknesses though. I would just rough it up and glue it on w/ tube glue.

    my fbr has like 5 of them in it... i will snap pics when i dismount it... LoL

  16. #16
    turtles make me hot
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    I plugged a hole in a 3.8 Knard for a friend a few years ago. He was training for a race and didn't want to cut the ride short. He was at the trailhead looking for assistance. I showed up and said I have a plug kit. We can try it or I can give you a ride home.
    Not only did the plug work, he raced on that tire the next day which I thought was insane.
    I like turtles

  17. #17
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    Harold.

    Yes. I've had good luck using automotive tire patch to patch big cuts/rips I get from the lava rock holes in my tires here in Hawaii.

    Bummer that happened. Good luck.

  18. #18
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    Same thing happened to me the other day. Took the tire off and sewed it together and put some shoe go over it on the inside. Haven't tested yet but I think it will be good.
    I'm going to add the needle and thread to my pack.

  19. #19
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    I have repaired several fat bike tires with car tire patches. They work perfectly, I have never had one fail, even running them tubeless for hundreds of miles after the patch.

  20. #20
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    Harold,

    i have some extra Nates that I can send you. They are the 33PSI version. Non-foldable.

    If you want them contact me through the message system on MTBR. I'll just charge you shipping. I took them off my Surly Wednesday. They are too aggressive for Florida, nice tires but overkill for my trails. I am in Tampa.

  21. #21
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    I ordered the patches, glue, pre-buff and bead sealer. With eBay bucks and Amazon points it was very little out of pocket. This should work for a couple fatty tires and a couple road bike tubeless that could use a good repair. I will report back when complete.

  22. #22
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    I ordered the patches, glue, pre-buff and bead sealer. With eBay bucks and Amazon points it was very little out of pocket. This should work for a couple fatty tires and a couple road bike tubeless that could use a good repair. I will report back when complete.
    Gonna give this a shot, too.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    ... It appears such things have been regulated away - I've seen mentions on car forums that those things produced some pretty toxic fumes. I'm able to find chemical vulcanizing cement pretty easily...
    The Rema site shows they have more modern products that are 'greener'. I've had no luck finding them locally (in Canada).
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  24. #24
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    The Rema site shows they have more modern products that are 'greener'. I've had no luck finding them locally (in Canada).
    Thanks for that tip. I'm not sure exactly which product you're talking about, but they make a reinforced tubeless tire patch kit specifically for bicycles that's pretty cheap.

    https://blueskycycling.com/products/...SABEgI42fD_BwE

    I might give this a try. I suppose if it doesn't work, I can always step up to the automotive version if necessary. I'm having a rather difficult time finding smaller "consumer" quantities of some of the products I'd otherwise purchase separately, to keep the overall cost less than buying the above offered cheap Nates. Or even an exact replacement of my 120tpi version.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Thanks for that tip. I'm not sure exactly which product you're talking about...
    Just that their entire product line for automotive tire repair & patch "systems" was updated for greener less volitile components. So while a favourite or prior recomended product may be deprecated or gone, there's usualy a greener replacement as the work still needs to get done. When I was looking on their site a year or two ago, this included automotive patches.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Just that their entire product line for automotive tire repair & patch "systems" was updated for greener less volitile components. So while a favourite or prior recomended product may be deprecated or gone, there's usualy a greener replacement as the work still needs to get done. When I was looking on their site a year or two ago, this included automotive patches.
    Regardless of the chemicals used to patch, patching is still way greener than tossing a tire and buying a replacement.

    Harold, I feel ya. Sadly for bicycle use the patching materials come in life time supply sizes. When it arrives I will likely tell my 17 year old daughter: "One day honey, this will be yours...".

  27. #27
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Harold, I feel ya. Sadly for bicycle use the patching materials come in life time supply sizes. When it arrives I will likely tell my 17 year old daughter: "One day honey, this will be yours...".
    hahaha. no joke. Well, I'm going to try the "bicycle" specific tire patches and we can compare notes. A couple things convinced me to go this route.

    First, I had no concept really of the sizes of the auto patches, and I didn't want to put something massive in there that was going to unbalance the tire significantly and cause weird handling at speed.

    Second was the quantities of the needed chemicals, and how much I was going to have to spend in shipping to get what I was after. Sadly, anywhere I was able to find smaller quantities of the chemicals also charged rather a lot for shipping, which made it more expensive than buying larger amounts of everything. Completely silly concept.

    These reinforced bicycle tire patches look to be a step or two more robust than the old school Park tube patches, plus with my hole being only a couple mm in diameter, should be able to handle it, assuming I clean everything out really well to get rid of any remaining mold release, old sealant, and dirt. I'll probably be applying the adhesive to both sides of the hole, too.

  28. #28
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    try an auto tire shop? I'm sure they would give/sell you a patch in the size that you need.

    Then buy a few for spares.

    Rubber cement should work as the vulcanizing fluid.
    Mike
    Toronto, Canada
    Giant Trance Advanced 1
    Trek Farley 9.6 + Lauf
    Diamondback Haanjo Trail Carbon
    Scott Solace 10 Disc

  29. #29
    since 4/10/2009
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    So far so good.

    Scrubbed out the tire casing pretty well with alcohol after getting the old sealant off (that just took some scrubbing with a rag to get it to ball up and come off).

    Used the included coarse sandpaper to expose some fibers from the tire casing.

    Used the included cement, gave it about 5min or so to get tacky (prob should have left it a little longer, as it's cool), and clamped the tire with patch between wood blocks for a couple hours. Then smeared a little silicone rtv over the top because I had a couple spots along the patch edge that didn't get any cement (I wasn't generous enough with application).

    I will probably not bother with mounting it until tomorrow. It will be stormy out, so a good day for it. Should be plenty of time to cure.

    Definitely a step above the old park tube patch kits. And just $10 for this one. Though the little tube of cement isn't enough for all 3 patches.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  30. #30
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    I got mine done too, but have yet to mount it. I did the flaming hot patch bit. Letting it burn for 10 seconds or so does heat things up and flash off some of the volatile chemicals. I covered the entire patch and edges with the bead sealer and it looks pretty good.

    One thing is for sure, I cannot see using bead sealer to actually seal a fat tire bead to a rim. I am not sure you would ever get it off. I could see using it to seal the bead to a split tube. It would likely give you a sealed assembly like one often gets with a fatty stripper.

  31. #31
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    So far so good. Mounted the tire up (damn, mounting fatbike tires tubeless is something I really hate doing). Had to break out the tube to pre-seat the bead, so I got to pull out a slimy tube. Inflated to about 20psi without sealant and the patch is holding well. Next step to fill with sealant.

  32. #32
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    First ride on the repaired tire today.

    Definitely a piece of rubber missing from the outer casing, but the patch held great. Holding air set up tubeless (sealant installed now) and no leaking from the repair.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  33. #33
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    I got out on my first ride on my repair yesterday. It survived a trail with a fair amount of rocks and roots perfectly. Here is what the inside repair looked like:

    Anyone successfully plugged a hole in a tire like this?-tire-repair.jpg

    Nice to save a $100 tire.

  34. #34
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    I got out on my first ride on my repair yesterday. It survived a trail with a fair amount of rocks and roots perfectly. Here is what the inside repair looked like:
    What specific patch did you buy? It doesn't look much bigger than what I used, and that was a concern of mine with the automotive patches.

  35. #35
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    I got these off eBay:



    I used the medium sized one that has a 2.25" diameter. The small is 1.75 and the large is 3.25". I can only see using the 3.25" for a car or ATV.

    I see Harbor Freight has these in a 60 patch kit for $9.

  36. #36
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    I see Harbor Freight has these in a 60 patch kit for $9.
    Might go that route to refill once I use up my kit, if I do.

    I'm curious about the hole you patched that you felt the need to use the 2.25" patch on it. The patches in my kit are 1.25" square, so I'm wondering if I'd ever even use the medium ones on bike tires.

  37. #37
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    The hole was large enough to fit a pencil. The weight difference between the two patches is not significant so I wanted a larger adhered area.

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