Anti-Corrosion product shootout!- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 155 of 155
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!

    Ever wonder what the best treatment for the insides of your chromoly steel frame would be?

    Were about to find out!

    Special thanks to Walt, Waltworks Custom Bicycles Bikes, recipes and ranting for sending me the chromoly tubing for this project.

    Products tested include the following

    product 1: Corrosion X HD

    product 2: Frame Saver

    product 3: WD-40 specialist long term corrosion inhibitor

    product 4: Boeshield T-9

    product 5: Amsoil Heavy duty metal protector

    Product 6: Fluid Film


    All products were bought with my own money. I am not affiliated with any of these companies.

    Note: All products were applied throughly. First coat allowed to cure 24hrs. 2nd coat allowed to cure another 24 hrs.
    All tubes were polished with a wire wheel and cleaned with alcohol before products were applied.

    I will be spraying tubes with a saltwater solution and posting images of the mayhem as regularly as I can.

    Which product do you think will be the winner?

    Tune in to find out!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_1695.jpg  

    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  2. #2
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    14,716
    You should maybe pee on each once or twice too, to simulate real-world conditions...

  3. #3
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    7,697
    Subscribed.

    I'm really hoping Frame Saver kicks ass as that's what's in all my frames.

    How often will they get sprayed with salt water?
    Are those little tubes behind the cans what your testing?
    What steel tubing is being used? Are they all the same?
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Hey OneSpeed


    They will be evenly sprayed down once daily
    All the tubes 1-6 are in order from left to right
    Corresponding treatments a shown above
    I will check with Walt on the tubing manuf.

    Lol Mike

    Yes peeing on them would really add to the excitement
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300

    Let the mayhem begin: Day 1

    Day 1


    product 1: Corrosion X HD

    product 2: Frame Saver

    product 3: WD-40 specialist long term corrosion inhibitor

    product 4: Boeshield T-9

    product 5: Amsoil Heavy duty metal protector

    Product 6: Fluid Film
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_1696.jpg  

    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  6. #6
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    7,697
    No doubt Walt uses a wide variety of tubing. Many of those could have very different corrosion resistance.

    I'm afraid if you can't be sure they are all the exact same material, this will all have to be taken with a grain of salt.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Just J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    I hope J.P. WEIGLE (FRAMESAVER) wins, 1, because my Waltworks has a lot of it in there and 2, because it cost me a fortune to get hold of! 

    Subscribed Mikee, looking forward to the results...

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mehlertmj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    119
    I hope the Framesaver works as well, but I am very curious to see the results of this.

    Also, +1 on the pee!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    398
    I don’t see Boeshield loosing.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,273
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    You should maybe pee on each once or twice too, to simulate real-world conditions...
    That's for derailleur testing...
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Any bike, anywhere, anytime.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    151
    May I suggest adding two / three things?

    (1) An example of mild steel, as it will rust more easily than the bicycle tubing. A common nail should work.

    Would doing so, provide a base line?

    (2) A hot parifin-minerial oil application. We went through this a short while ago in referance to chain lubes; a creative mind could come up with a method to apply the mix in a seat tube.

    What is unknown...are all of the tubing examples of the same type? If not, it invalidates the experiment. If so...it needs to be stated to be sure we are comparing apples to apples.

    Walt?

    (3) Subject each example to a 'naked' salt exposure? While not necessary, it would point out just how effective each application substance is over none at all.

    If these suggestions come a little late...not all is lost; for under the 'unknowns' the experiment still is pointing the reader in the right direction.

    The effort is to be applauded!

    @VB; you know under the temps Mike rides, he has to, from time to time, pee on his chain and derailleur to brake them free, adding a little salt, lowers the temp at which freezing will do so again; and you know, at freezing temps, his aim is not precise!

    Well...that is an assumption made from personal experience...if...I can find it!
    "Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway" John Wayne

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Yes, I totally should have put an untreated piece up there...

    Fwiw I did an experiment similar to this using roughly 20 different treatment methods, and i did use an untreated control piece in that test.

    The best product from my first test however were unacceptable for use for bicycle frame tubing because the products would not spread once sprayed into a tube.

    For example:
    One of the leading products in my first test was called “5th wheel lube” nasty black stuff. I tried spraying it into a piece of pvc pipe to see what it would do.
    It was so thick/gummy it just stuck right to where it was sprayed. So not ideal for bikes.

    Sidenote: Considering what I learned from the first round of testing, I wanted to use products that were not “solvents”
    Think firearms lube/cleaners
    I wanted something that would coat tubes internally and then stay put!

    My plan after discovering the winner is to flush out the tubes every 6-12 months with some sort of solvent/alcohol and then reapply the winning product. #healthytubes

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Kirkerik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    507
    Just leave it in there! No?

    My vote goes to Fluid Film. I have had good results with it except on epdm gasket
    Studded Dillinger 4/5 For Sale

    The tires are the things on your bike that make contact w the trail

  14. #14
    Rent this space for $
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,597
    CorrosionX HD. My Surly frames are full of CorrosionX Marine which I believe is similar. I've been using it for years on ocean going offshore boats. Stuff is straight up good! A number of years ago, I saw a similar test done under similar conditions but with plate steel. There are a few new products out since but Boeshield was around as was the CorrosionX. They used standard WD40 back then and amazingly, it was very near the top of the list when it was all over.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,273
    Quote Originally Posted by SADDLE TRAMP View Post
    [email protected]VB; you know under the temps Mike rides, he has to, from time to time, pee on his chain and derailleur to brake them free, adding a little salt, lowers the temp at which freezing will do so again; and you know, at freezing temps, his aim is not precise! ...
    At those temps, I'd be lucky to find something to aim with...
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Any bike, anywhere, anytime.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    26
    One could get their frame galvanized. It may not look attractive, but it should hold up fairly well.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    429
    product 5: Amsoil Heavy duty metal protector
    That's my guess/hunch.
    Never had a steel frame rust out. Just jet it with water to wash crap out. pull the seetpost to let dry and spray some crap in the vent holes now and again. Pulling the seat post often is probably the best, bb likes that also.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Hey Surly I Ride,

    Yeah, galvanizing is a concept for sure.
    I galvanized a set of motorcycle fenders years ago. I could be wrong but there may be certain challenges in galvanizing varieties of objects and shapes. It might be a good idea to consult with a pro on this one. Would be cool to send an old frame to get galvanized just for the hell of it.

    Fwiw my Harley fenders, although now more corrosion resistant seemed weaker. This could have just been me though. Take this with a grain of salt.

    Sidenote: In my first round of testing the number one product in corrosion prevention was POWDERCOAT.

    Hands down!

    All the other steel pieces were destroyed by corrosion and the powdered pieces looked good as new!

    This may help readers of this thread torn between an old school paint job or a powdercoat.

    I used multiple different enamel paints.
    Waxed paints... Greased paints etc.

    POWDERCOAT is KING

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300

    A few spots forming on No. 4, all the others have zero signs of rust

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_1752.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: toadmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    163
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeetheviking View Post
    Hey Surly I Ride,

    Yeah, galvanizing is a concept for sure.
    I galvanized a set of motorcycle fenders years ago. I could be wrong but there may be certain challenges in galvanizing varieties of objects and shapes. It might be a good idea to consult with a pro on this one. Would be cool to send an old frame to get galvanized just for the hell of it.

    Fwiw my Harley fenders, although now more corrosion resistant seemed weaker. This could have just been me though. Take this with a grain of salt.

    Sidenote: In my first round of testing the number one product in corrosion prevention was POWDERCOAT.

    Hands down!

    All the other steel pieces were destroyed by corrosion and the powdered pieces looked good as new!

    This may help readers of this thread torn between an old school paint job or a powdercoat.

    I used multiple different enamel paints.
    Waxed paints... Greased paints etc.

    POWDERCOAT is KING
    Powder coat I have also found to be generally superior for corrosion resistance. Exception, on sharp edges it doesn't perform well as sides of tube & plate.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,260
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeetheviking View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1752.jpg 
Views:	349 
Size:	67.6 KB 
ID:	1190017
    Nooooo...
    Latitude 61

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blockphi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,614
    Quote Originally Posted by SADDLE TRAMP View Post
    May I suggest adding two / three things?

    (1) An example of mild steel, as it will rust more easily than the bicycle tubing. A common nail should work.

    Would doing so, provide a base line?

    (2) A hot parifin-minerial oil application. We went through this a short while ago in referance to chain lubes; a creative mind could come up with a method to apply the mix in a seat tube.

    What is unknown...are all of the tubing examples of the same type? If not, it invalidates the experiment. If so...it needs to be stated to be sure we are comparing apples to apples.

    Walt?

    (3) Subject each example to a 'naked' salt exposure? While not necessary, it would point out just how effective each application substance is over none at all.

    If these suggestions come a little late...not all is lost; for under the 'unknowns' the experiment still is pointing the reader in the right direction.

    The effort is to be applauded!

    @VB; you know under the temps Mike rides, he has to, from time to time, pee on his chain and derailleur to brake them free, adding a little salt, lowers the temp at which freezing will do so again; and you know, at freezing temps, his aim is not precise!

    Well...that is an assumption made from personal experience...if...I can find it!
    Follow on - how about testing untreated tube vs treated tube with alu seat post - how long until galvanic corrosion sets in? And... will peeing on it break it loose? (Not that I've ever fused a seat post to a steel frame before... )

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_1762.jpgAnti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_1763.jpg

    Per Walt,

    All tubes are 4130 True Temper

    Today we have 2 products allowing rust to form

    Product 2:Framesaver

    and Product 4:Boeshield T-9

    All others are rust-free at the moment.

    Kinda makes me sad about the boeshield, because it is one of my favorite drivetrain lubes
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Legbacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,564
    My Pipedream Moxie. "All of our frames are have ED (Electrophoretic Deposition) treatment. This covers every surface, inside and out, with a uniform non-porous layer which protects the frame from corrosion. The frames are then painted."

    Moxie Enduro Hardtail | 27.5/27.5+/29er Compatible
    Formerly Travis Bickle

    Team Robot. "modulation is code for “I suck at brake control.” Here’s a free tip: get better."

  25. #25
    Your bike sucks
    Reputation: Carl Mega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,902
    I didn't think I'd like this thread...but I'm liking this thread. A few baseless and bold predictions with wagers would have cemented the suspense but the rising action delivers.
    Working to stomp out redundancy, I repeat, working to stomp out redundancy.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Hey Travis,

    Where can a frame be sent for ED coatings?
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  27. #27
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    7,697
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    My Pipedream Moxie. "All of our frames are have ED (Electrophoretic Deposition) treatment. This covers every surface, inside and out, with a uniform non-porous layer which protects the frame from corrosion. The frames are then painted."
    Surly and a few others use the same process from the factory, which I love. It's interesting to me that Surly also still recommends Frame Saver as the best preventative measure, in addition to the factory coating.

    OP thanks for clarifying we are testing the same tubing for all products, that could have potentially made a big difference.

    I'm pretty surprised to see rust on the Frame saver piece. Granted this is some rough testing conditions (not even a rinse cycle, which I'm totally on board with) but with two coats I would have expected it to hold up better/longer.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  28. #28
    Rent this space for $
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,597
    I don't think either of my Karate Monkeys have ED. In fact, they are both quite rigid.

  29. #29
    Thingamejigger
    Reputation: Flying_Scotsman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,157
    Are we missing a contendor here? ACF-50??

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ferrstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    367
    Just saw this. Cool test! I'm guessing Fuidfilm continues to perform well. That's what I've settled on for my cars here in the rustbelt. After a year or so with some road grime mixed in it becomes extremely sticky and effective. Only place it isn't fantastic is in the wheel wells where it gets hit with a direct shot of spray from the tires. Pretty much disappears after about 100 miles.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    5,460
    Where's the one with boiled linseed oil? That's inside my Karate Monkey. With a little care, a steel bike should last quite a long time.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    7,652
    This is a funny thread to me, I don’t keep a bike long enough for it to corrode much

    Carbon and Ti are corrosion resistant

    I’m more concerned about corrosion on my vehicle...

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Legbacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,564
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeetheviking View Post
    Hey Travis,

    Where can a frame be sent for ED coatings?
    No idea, Pipedream shipped the frame from the factory in Taiwan. They don't make a fat bike though.
    Formerly Travis Bickle

    Team Robot. "modulation is code for “I suck at brake control.” Here’s a free tip: get better."

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Kirkerik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    507
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    This is a funny thread to me, I don’t keep a bike long enough for it to corrode much

    Carbon and Ti are corrosion resistant

    I’m more concerned about corrosion on my vehicle...
    You can apply the winning "protectant" to your vehicle too. Unless of course it's made of Ti and carbon!

    Yes, it's a little funny but why not preserve the bike as long as possible so some one somewhere can enjoy the bike too. Imagine your old whatever mtb ending up who knows where changing the life of some soul who could really use it. They'd be stoked!
    Studded Dillinger 4/5 For Sale

    The tires are the things on your bike that make contact w the trail

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Redlands R&C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    945
    Been a few days, what's the updated list/pictures?

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_1824.jpgAnti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_1823.jpgAnti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_1822.jpg

    Hey Jason Rides Bikes, forgive my delay.

    Product 4: Boeshield is doing very poorly "the worst so far"

    Next one with corrosion still spreading is product 2: Framesaver

    Product 5: Amsoil Heavy Duty Metal Protector has a teeny weeny bit of corrosion forming

    All others are corrosion free
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    151
    Go Fluid Film!
    "Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway" John Wayne

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Redlands R&C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    945
    Wow, makes me question if I should order that frame saver from Q like I was thinking about doing.
    Is there a control piece that hasn't been treated? I wonder if the frame saver/others that are developing rust are just creating a layer between the metal and the rust isn't actually getting to the tubing?

    I'm glad you are testing this! I do (finally) plan on actually keeping the bikes I have now (Jones Plus, Pugsley) so have been thinking of what to treat the frames with.
    Silly bike things happening.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Hey Jason Rides Bikes,

    Yeah, it appears there is something better out there than Surly's recommended framesaver and boeshield that we've been using all these years.

    I can't wait to see who the top 2 finalists are

    FWIW this is my second round of testing and boeshield and framesaver performed quite poorly. Part of the reason I am investigating better solutions.

    I totally forgot to do a control piece.

    However I did use a control piece on my first test and as you can imagine the speed at which the corrosion spread was significantly faster then all other test pieces.
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Redlands R&C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    945
    I imagine within a month there will be quite the colorization. I may hold off another week or two. I did see that wd40 has a rust inhibitor when I was picking up some tools at HD

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    26
    After the rust has settled, will there be a test on rust neutralizer?

  42. #42
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    7,697
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Rides Bikes View Post
    Wow, makes me question if I should order that frame saver from Q like I was thinking about doing.
    Do you also plan on spraying the inside of your frame with salt water every day? If not, Frame Saver is a great product for protecting the inside of your frame.

    It won't increase the tolerances inside your seat tube, or gum up the threads of your BSA BB, and it's been successfully used by thousands for many years. Many frame manufacturers even recommend it by name.

    Some of these other products may also work inside a bike frame, but there are some unknowns for sure. Use at your own risk.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  43. #43
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,310
    Does anyone have experience with a quality frame developing rust to the point of failure or where you were no longer comfortable that it was safe? My understanding is that rust is looked at a little differently now-a-days, that if it is good quality steel, it can form a protective coat of rust just on the surface that does not spread through the interior and weaken the metal. I see a lot of pedestrian bridges that have a rust coat from the day they are installed.

    Powder coat is definitely a great protection but I question if it can effectively be applied inside a tube. I can see that being an issue with a lot of products.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  44. #44
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    7,697
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Does anyone have experience with a quality frame developing rust to the point of failure or where you were no longer comfortable that it was safe?
    One of the steel frames I broke a couple years ago broke the chainstay on the drive side clean through. It happened right at the vent hole near the dropout which was also in the heat effected zone from welding so I can't say for sure what the problem was. I bought the frame used and don't know how it was treated before I owned it, but I could see some light rust in there. That was a Reynolds 520 frame.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    7,652
    Ya know, there are already plenty of examples of this type of protection in use, for example steel tubing that is shipped and stored for long periods of time; they use a heavy grease/oil. I’m sure a wax based product would “stick” to steel quite well.

    A thick oil with a rust inhibitor, heated, poured into a frame, swirled and dumped, that’d be a fair choice.

    I still don’t see that rust is a big deal, lots of old steel frames out there that are fine years after being built without any internal protection.

    If I was riding in salty conditions, I’d ride something that is corrosion resistant.

    I’d be curious about a corrosion resistance comparison between steel and aluminum frames, using actual frames, with stress testing. A couple broken frames, use the head tube or B.B. sections.

    K don’t keep bikes long enough for rust to develop

  46. #46
    Rent this space for $
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,597
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post

    A thick oil with a rust inhibitor, heated, poured into a frame, swirled and dumped, that’d be a fair choice.
    The CorrosionX product I have used for years is sort of like that. It's a pretty sticky gooey substance that cures in place and as we're seeing in this test, it works incredibly well. Like I mentioned above, my '15 Karate Monkey got the full treatment of CorrosionX Marine and the items I have sprayed it on for years on several offshore boats I run are proving the stuff completely effective.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Products 2 and 4 are still spiraling downward

    Product 5 has a very small spot of corrosion beginning to form

    Products 1, 3 and 6 remain unscathed

    Note: I am VERY impressed with the corrosion resistance of chromoly steel compared to mild steel

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_1889.jpgAnti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_1890.jpgAnti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_1891.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    13,944
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Does anyone have experience with a quality frame developing rust to the point of failure or where you were no longer comfortable that it was safe?


    I took my untreated Pugs to the Baja and camped on the beach a firsbee's throw from the ocean for a combined total of at least 6 months over several trips. I rode through the area the waves would crash onto the beach so the tires were spraying saltwater at times. I never washed the bike or at least so infrequently it might have been 1/year. At home I rode it through typical Canadian winters with road salt and such.



    I didn't submerge it in the ocean or ride right into the ocean. Mostly because that seemed dumb.

    It developed some minor surface rust. After about 4yrs I took the bike apart, sandblasted the frame and refinished it. The bike is now 10yrs old and a friend is still riding it.

    After that I stopped worrying about rustproofing the inside of my steel frames despite living in the PNWet now. If I cared about the finish I should have washed it weekly in Baja with fresh water to get the salt off. I don't worry about any threat to structural integrity due to normal use in snow or rain.

    I would ensure my steel bikes had a drain hole in the bottom of the BB. For my proper "rain bikes" I use full fenders to keep wheel spray at bay.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    13,944
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    My Pipedream Moxie. "All of our frames are have ED (Electrophoretic Deposition) treatment. This covers every surface, inside and out, with a uniform non-porous layer which protects the frame from corrosion. The frames are then painted."

    Moxie Enduro Hardtail | 27.5/27.5+/29er Compatible
    My newest Surly frame came with ED coating as well. I didn't bother with any additional rustproofing.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dRjOn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,604
    interesting....
    For a rock steady Gas Tank bag > the DeWidget

    bit.ly/BuyDeWidget

    https://www.instagram.com/drj0n_bagworks/

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    ... I’m sure a wax based product would “stick” to steel quite well...
    Like Waxoyl?
    With cars, it's Hardwax for underbody, 'soft wax' for inside panels, and Topwax for protecting paint for storage (or harsh environments).
    Friend had his '84 Golf treated with the Hardwax. Where treated, it was still good 24 years later when the vehicle went to someone else.
    After checking it out when a friend kept an '84 Golf good (where we salt roads) for 24 years before it went to someone else, I got some hardwax and softwax for my car. So I give a shot of 'soft wax' into steel bike tubes for protection; good so far.
    I haven't tried Topwax.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Test Update:

    Product 1,3 and 6 still immaculate


    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_1934.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  53. #53
    Rent this space for $
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,597
    I had faith in #1 based on experience. I'm glad that I filled my Karate Monkey frame with it when bought new. Not that I'll benefit from it but maybe in a hundred years it'll end up in a museum!

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ze_Zaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,024
    Would be interesting to also test boiled linseed oil.
    It was the rust inhibitor of choice for centuries.

    I've used it on most of my pre-ED coated steel frames. I now use it annually (or close) to protect my Land Rover Defenders' frame and bulkhead.

    It polymerizes into a elastic rubbery layer, very sturdy

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300

    First complete failure

    My beloved drivetrain lube is the first to completely fail.

    This test has already paid of in my eyes.

    Because I was about to use Boeshield in a brand new Waltworks.

    If any Surly reps are reading this, or anyone who can forward this to Surly.
    Surly may want to re-consider recommending the use of Boeshield inside their frames.

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2229.jpgAnti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2230.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  56. #56
    Rent this space for $
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,597
    Not to despair. Perhaps as a lube, your beloved Boeshield may still be useful. I certainly wouldn't be squirting into my frame, though!

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Hey Oh My Sack!

    Yeah, I will keep using it on the drivetrain.

    Speaking of drivetrain lubes...

    Anyone have a preference? and why?
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    548
    Thanks for doing this test, Mikee! Thanks to your test results, the rust scales have fallen from my eyes! I sprayed Boeshield inside the frame of my Pugs that I ride on the beach and in the dunes. I do rinse my bike after every beach ride using a gentle spray from my garden hose. But I now may have to get one of the better products for inside my frames. (This bike sports the "full dress" Big-O fenders, which are simply awesome for keeping sand from the tires from getting flung onto the frame and chain)

    I use galvanized KMC Rustbuster chains, and since I run Shimano A-8 IGH hubs, the Boeshield seems to stay on my chains fairly well. I am still using my first KMC Rustbuster chain, which has been in service for 4 years and easily has 1,000 miles on it. I haven't lubed it for over a month, now (I only average about 60 miles/month on this bike). The links still function smoothly. I guess I should wonder about "chain stretch".

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Hey PlutonicPlague!

    Never heard of the rustbuster chain before! Looks great for the beach!

    Thanks for the tip!

  60. #60
    Thingamejigger
    Reputation: Flying_Scotsman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,157
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeetheviking View Post
    .....drivetrain lubes... Anyone have a preference? and why?
    Squirt lube..... wax based dry lube, keeps the drivetrain clean and sand free.... cant remember the last time I used a chain cleaner on my bike.

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Testing update:

    The next candidate showing signs of weakness is Framesaver

    Note: Look at the salt deposits forming on the Amsoil treated piece
    None of the other pieces are allowing formations of this sort.

    There are still 3 pieces that are immaculate. I have been raining on these guys the past few weeks trying harder to speed corrosion and some pieces simply will not begin to corrode.

    I am BEYOND impressed!

    I want a CHAMPION already

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2329.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,088
    What three are still in the running?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Top 3 performers right now are:

    Fluid Film
    Corrosion X
    WD-40 long term corrosion inhibitor

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    663
    Even without a steel frame, it's an interesting test and intriguing that some of the favourite lubes are struggling. Whilst the lowly brother of the often maligned WD-40 is holding up

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Update:

    The Framesaver treated tube is covered 1/4 with corrosion but still hanging tough.

    While Framesave does not appear to be the best choice overall, it is certainly a GREAT product!

    Sidenote: I have built a little “sweat box” to create a super humid environment. It has been sitting out in the sun and the tubes have been sprayed down multiple times per day.

    Last night i sprayed some battery acid on them, simply because it is taking a lifetime for the leading products to fail.

    This should get interesting #evillaugh

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    2nd update of the day

    Just got home to inspect the tubes after roughly 24hrs of battery acid treatment and HOLY MOTHER! HIGHLY CORROSIVE!

    Enjoy some close up shots of Framesaver fighting to the bitter end!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2461.jpg  

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2460.jpg  

    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2463.jpgUpdate #3 today Corrosion X after 24 hours of Battery Acid!
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Close up of WD-40 "long term corrosion inhibitor" after 24hrs of battery acid treatment!Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2464-2.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Close Up of Amsoil Heavy Duty Metal Protector #5 and Fluid Film #6 after 24 hrs of battery acid treatment


    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2465.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    So it looks like Amsoil Heavy Duty Metal Protector, Corrosion X HD, and Fluid Film are in the running for the win!

    At this rate we should have a winning product after a few days!
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    151
    Battery acid idea was great! After 2 months of your hard work...you are/have gone beyond any call of duty.

    Spray them down again.

    You should be nominited as poster of the year.

    Thanks.
    "Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway" John Wayne

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PurpleMtnSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    1,112
    Quote Originally Posted by SADDLE TRAMP View Post
    Battery acid idea was great! After 2 months of your hard work...you are/have gone beyond any call of duty.

    Spray them down again.

    You should be nominited as poster of the year.

    Thanks.
    + 1

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Ha Thanks Saddle Tramp and PurpleMtnSlayer,

    Long live Chromoly!

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    202
    LPS..used in aviation for decades...
    ..lps spray lube#2 or #3


    https://2ncda71rblfr1j9gym207l85-wpe...06.380.500.jpg


    LPS Labs

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Thanks FASTFAT!

    Will have to look into this for the 2019 shootout!

  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Framesaver: Today, you have died a graceful death

    48hrs of battery acid

    RIP Framesaver

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2471.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  77. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    The Final Four!

    CorrosionX HD
    WD-40 Long Term Corrosion Inhibitor
    Amsoil Heavy Duty Metal Protector
    Fluid Film

    Deathmatch!

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2472.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  78. #78
    Thread Killer
    Reputation: bucksaw87's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    767
    Very cool seeing the photographic evidence in this little experiment!
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Thanks bucksaw87!

    Glad you are enjoying this!

    If anyone has any product recommendations for a 2019 shootout
    do share!

  80. #80
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    3 Days of battery acid

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2490.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  81. #81
    Thread Killer
    Reputation: bucksaw87's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    767
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeetheviking View Post
    Thanks bucksaw87!

    Glad you are enjoying this!

    If anyone has any product recommendations for a 2019 shootout
    do share!
    I've taken quite an interest in synthetic oils and greases lately, but I'm not sure on the feasibility of studying those like this...If you're interested, I'll share some notes with you on comparisons I've done (as it pertains to Phil Wood vs. a light zinc-based grease...then I've recently begun looking into ceramic and other grease materials)
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  82. #82
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Hey bucksaw87,

    Yes I am interested in those notes.

    I did do Synthetic vs Conventional oil and grease corrosion testing earlier this year. The results were nearly identical.
    Nothing to write home about. Not what I expected.

  83. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    I did a casual check on youtbube, and the only thing I saw that degraded Fluid Film protection was repeated pressure washing, and the protection was still good, just degraded some.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  84. #84
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Good to know Canoe!

    Things are still relatively similar with the final four.

    Nothing noteworthy or photoworthy to report this weekend.

  85. #85
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,310
    Note to self: don't ride bikes through battery acid.

    Thanks for taking the time to do this, Mike. It's been interesting and informative.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  86. #86
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Ha Thanks chazpat!

    You are welcome!

    Right now I’d be content using any of the “final four” here

    When you order Corrosion X HD and Amsoil Heavy Duty Metal protector the products come in MUCH LARGER aerosol cans in comparison to the other products

    Quantity and Quality

  87. #87
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Amsoil Heavy Duty Metal Protector, today you have died a graceful death.

    R.I.P.

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2615.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  88. #88
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    3 can keep a secret if 2 are dead

    The Final Three



    1. Corrosion X HD
    2. WD-40 Specialist Long Term Corrosion Inhibitor
    3. Fluid Film

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2616.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  89. #89
    Rent this space for $
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,597
    My 2 Karate Monkeys will be around for hundreds of years thanks to the CorrosionX treatment I gave them. I just knew that stuff would be at the top of the list after using it for so many years in extremely inhospitable salty marine environments. No surprises.

    It's been a great test! Fun to watch.

  90. #90
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Today, Corrosion X HD

    You have died a graceful death

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2671.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  91. #91
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Ok guys,

    This is it....

    Our deathmatch has commenced

    Who will survive to tell the tale?

    (shown right)Product #3 WD-40 Specialist Long Term Corrosion Inhibitor

    vs

    (shown left)Product #6 Fluid Film

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2672.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  92. #92
    Human Test Subject
    Reputation: Volsung's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,289
    These pics make me glad my main bike is stainless steel.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

  93. #93
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Quote Originally Posted by Volsung View Post
    These pics make me glad my main bike is stainless steel.
    And glad I stopped dipping mine in battery acid...
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  94. #94
    Rent this space for $
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,597
    I call foul. It ain't over till it topples over!

  95. #95
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Today you, WD-40 Specialist Long Term Corrosion Inhibitor have died a most gracious death. Well done. Well done.

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2683.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  96. #96
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Ladies & Gentlemen

    I give to you, the winner of the 2018 Anti-Corrosion Product Shootout

    Product#6

    Fluid Film

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2685.jpgAnti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_2684.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  97. #97
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Final thoughts,

    The Surly recommended Boeshield T-9 or Framesaver are the last products I would choose to treat a frame.

    Amsoil Heavy Duty Metal Protector and Corrosion X HD are the "best bang for the buck" Sold in BIG cans

    WD-40 Specialist Long Term Corrosion Inhibitor and Fluid film are sold in small cans. Maybe they offer larger cans?
    But these 2 products outshine the rest

    I was surprised by every outcome of this project.

    I will be treating my new Waltworks frame with Fluid Film!

  98. #98
    mtbr member
    Reputation: toadmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    163
    EPIC thread.

    Good work OP

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  99. #99
    Thread Killer
    Reputation: bucksaw87's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    767
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeetheviking View Post
    Final thoughts,

    The Surly recommended Boeshield T-9 or Framesaver are the last products I would choose to treat a frame.

    Amsoil Heavy Duty Metal Protector and Corrosion X HD are the "best bang for the buck" Sold in BIG cans

    WD-40 Specialist Long Term Corrosion Inhibitor and Fluid film are sold in small cans. Maybe they offer larger cans?
    But these 2 products outshines the rest

    I was surprised by every outcome of this project.

    I will be treating my new Waltworks frame with Fluid Film!
    Question for you about that Boeshield:
    My favorite LPTS (local power tool store) sells Boeshield T-9 right alongside the tablesaws, drill presses, miter saws, and circular saws for use as a protectant on the sliding surfaces of each tool. They've always extolled the virtues of T-9 as leaving a light film, but not messing with the wood you're working on. Have you tried any of your products on power tools at all? Do they work as well as T-9 is purported to in that setting?
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  100. #100
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Hey Bucksaw87,

    I cannot speak to these applications.

    However I do see Boeshield being ideal for this and countless other applications.

    Boeshield is a very “clean to work with product”

    I will continue to buy and use Boeshield.

    Just won’t use it in a frame

  101. #101
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Just J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Good work Mikee!

    So the question is, how do I get Frame Saver OUT of my Waltworks?! Ha ha. It's actually a bit concerning because I can't imagine what's happening inside my frame at the moment given the moisture it's subjected to for the most part of the year?!

    The good news for me is that the Fluid Film product is readily available and a lot cheaper than Frame Saver...

  102. #102
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Just J,

    You bring up a good point.

    I was actually thinking the same thing and was wanting to do some other experimenting with things like rubbing alcohol/brake clean/different degreasers etc. to find out which one would easily wash away these products. I just simply havent done any testing yet...
    I would consider trying doing this with rubbing alcohol.

    Sidenote:

    This testing was “EXTREME”
    I’m confident that your tubing is safe right now with framesaver.

    But it wouldn’t hurt to upgrade in the future

  103. #103
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Just J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Thanks Mikee, yes I'd be inclined to slosh some Isopropyl Alcohol around the insides of the frame. Next time the frame is stripped, I will take a good look and report back...

  104. #104
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,260
    Quote Originally Posted by Just J View Post
    Good work Mikee!

    So the question is, how do I get Frame Saver OUT of my Waltworks?!
    It looks like you could use battery acid to get it out.
    Latitude 61

  105. #105
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ferrstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    367
    FWIW I've used Fluid Film over existing products. I would think treating over Frame Saver should be fine. If you did want to remove Frame Saver I'm sure Laquer Thinner would do it but then again it would remove paint too. Maybe a project for the next paint job.

    Thanks again to the OP for running this test! I can't say I'm too surprised. I tried several products on my cars before I settled on Fluid Film. I have cars that have seen a decade of Cleveland winters and the Fluid Film is keeping them very rust free.

  106. #106
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Just J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Quote Originally Posted by sryanak View Post
    It looks like you could use battery acid to get it out.
    LOL good idea, why didn’t I think of that?!

  107. #107
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    195
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeetheviking View Post
    Thanks bucksaw87!

    Glad you are enjoying this!

    If anyone has any product recommendations for a 2019 shootout
    do share!
    Maxima chain wax. It goes on very liquid like kerosene. Sake your bike around and let it drain out the holes. It then dries like the stuff car brake rotors come coated with. (I also use it on new vehicles in the cracks and crevasis) I even used Maxima chain wax inside my aluminum frame to prevent corrosion for ocean beach rides and salty winter Michigan roads. I don't like to use it to wax my chain however. Squirt lube works better than any previous wax I have used except maybe boiling the chain in paraffin.(waxing since 1975)

    Cleaner - use brake rotor cleaner to get any of this oil out of your frame. (basically the same stuff dry cleaners use)

  108. #108
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Lol sryanak

    Yes ferrstein, I think you have the right idea just spraying Fluid Film right over the Framesaver should work.

    k.b. “Maxima chainwax noted!

  109. #109
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    124
    Cool thread and great test! I've used Fluid Film for a few years now. Great product. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think I read that it's non toxic, all natural.
    Last edited by joshtee; 06-10-2018 at 08:23 PM.

  110. #110
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ferrstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by joshtee View Post
    Cool thread and great test! I've used Fluid Film for a few years now. Great product. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think I read that it's non toxic, all natural.
    Indeed. It is basically lanolin, so it does have the risk of making your skin really soft. The spray cans have propellants that are probably not harmless but this stuff isn't nearly as toxic as most things of this nature. I do wear a respirator to keep from inhaling the mist when I apply it... but then again I pretty much always wear a respirator when I'm making dust or fumes.

  111. #111
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Quote Originally Posted by ferrstein View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by joshtee View Post
    Cool thread and great test! I've used Fluid Film for a few years now. Great product. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think I read that it's non toxic, all natural.
    Indeed. It is basically lanolin, so it does have the risk of making your skin really soft. The spray cans have propellants that are probably not harmless but this stuff isn't nearly as toxic as most things of this nature. I do wear a respirator to keep from inhaling the mist when I apply it... but then again I pretty much always wear a respirator when I'm making dust or fumes.
    Fluid Film produces a number of products: "lanolin-based brand of corrosion preventive and lubricant". The one tested is available in an aerosol and non-aerosol. Description on site includes:
    • "a non-toxic, long lasting, thixotropic liquid"
    • "formulated from specially processed wool-wax, highly refined petroleum oils and selected agents"

    The SDS lists ingredients of the aerosol version as:
    • Refined petroleum oil, hydrotreated heavy paraffinic
    • Petroleum gases, liquified, sweetened
    • Benzenesulfonic Acid, Di-C10-18-alkyl derivs., calcium salts
    The non-aerosol drops the middle ingredient.

    I assume those are the ingredients in addition to Lanolin?

    (wikipedia on Lanolin mentions "Commercial products (e.g. Lanocote) containing up to 85% lanolin are used to prevent corrosion in marine fasteners, especially when two different metals are in contact with each other and saltwater.")
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  112. #112
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Fluid Film produces a number of products: "lanolin-based brand of corrosion preventive and lubricant". The one tested is available in an aerosol and non-aerosol. Description on site includes:

    • "a non-toxic, long lasting, thixotropic liquid"
    • "formulated from specially processed wool-wax, highly refined petroleum oils and selected agents"

    The SDS lists ingredients of the aerosol version as:
    • Refined petroleum oil, hydrotreated heavy paraffinic
    • Petroleum gases, liquified, sweetened
    • Benzenesulfonic Acid, Di-C10-18-alkyl derivs., calcium salts

    The non-aerosol drops the middle ingredient.

    I assume those are the ingredients in addition to Lanolin?

    (wikipedia on Lanolin mentions "Commercial products (e.g. Lanocote) containing up to 85% lanolin are used to prevent corrosion in marine fasteners, especially when two different metals are in contact with each other and saltwater.")
    Based on this thread, I purchased a can of Fluid Film (I have been using T9 to coat my frames.... seems like I could do better). I applied a generous coat to tubes of Salsa Fargo, and it really smells strongly of lanolin (gamey).

    I regret my decision. I sometimes go bikepacking in bear county (Sierras), and am genuinely concerned that the strong smell will attract bears. Bears have a better sense of smell than dogs, and this bike now is redolent of calorie-dense animal fat

    I may try taking the bike apart and trying to rinse off the Fluid Film with alcohol, then apply WD-40 Specialist Long Term Corrosion Inhibitor.

    Does anyone else share my concern?

  113. #113
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Quote Originally Posted by NudeRanch View Post
    Based on this thread, I purchased a can of Fluid Film (I have been using T9 to coat my frames.... seems like I could do better). I applied a generous coat to tubes of Salsa Fargo, and it really smells strongly of lanolin (gamey).

    I regret my decision. I sometimes go bikepacking in bear county (Sierras), and am genuinely concerned that the strong smell will attract bears. Bears have a better sense of smell than dogs, and this bike now is redolent of calorie-dense animal fat

    I may try taking the bike apart and trying to rinse off the Fluid Film with alcohol, then apply WD-40 Specialist Long Term Corrosion Inhibitor.

    Does anyone else share my concern?
    No.
    But that doesn't mean there isn't something to it.

    I was working on reviving friend's kid's bikes this evening, after they were left out in the rain & snow all winter. Since this is likely to remain the case moving forward, and having a can of Fluid Film handy in anticipation of treating my frames, I decided to use it to treat various rusty parts, wiping a thin coat into many a rust spot and joint. We'll see how it protects going forward.

    All the chains were rusty. So I tried some on those too. Except for one chain that's a write-off, Fluid Film seemed to revive them very well: smooth, quiet, but I've no idea on abrasion or chain wear in the future with all of that ferrous oxide lubed around those joints. Most of the joints in the write-off chain revived well, with many initially reluctant, some had to be forced to move (and shortly worked well), while a few stayed seized. I'll certainly try it on the replacement chain I get, as I'm certain the bikes will be spending their entire time outdoors in the weather.

    I used it to lube a seized brake line I got to move. Once lubed with Fluid Film, it improved movement, but not enough for my liking, so that line will be replaced. I'll try a bit on the replacement line, and a few others, to see if this stops these kids bikes from rusting/seizing at the low point in the lines. Not something we're usually concerned with regarding our bikes that get regular maintenance and aren't left outside 24/7 to rust in the weather. I'm hesitant to try it on my quality lines, which I've never had any issue with.

    So with a number of treated parts and surfaces on three bikes, with a number of over lubricated points, one absolutely soaked chain and thoroughly treated hands (that I'm certain won't rust for a decade), there was no discernible smell left once the aerosol smell evaporated away. None of the pets showed any interest in the bike, spray can or drippings - nor my hands. I wasn't attacked, followed nor propositioned by any coyotes nor bears on my way home, nor by any of the misquotes that was bothering the kids' mom.

    Despite lanolin's reputation for making for supple skin, I easily washed it off with soap and water. My hands do feel nice: smoother, softer than usual, but not oily nor greasy. I can't say that I discern any return of youthful elasticity. Your results may vary.

    Perhaps you could treat a bike and hang it in the woods in front of a trail cam.

    I suppose you could add something spicy to sprinkle on the lanolin in the tubes, then hope none of the bears were former dump-bears and learnt to like Mexican.

    (I did find one alleged incident of the use of Lanolin attributed to causing an angry dragon to approach a smurf, but I believe that report should be regarded with some suspicion.)
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  114. #114
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    I've never had an issue with bears and oiled wool sweaters, but not a lot of time in bear country with them, and who knows what other smells I may have had that were a deterrent. Haven't heard of any issues either.

    There is this, regarding the making of bear lures.
    When using skunk essence, three ounces of pure tincture can be mixed with a pound or more of lanolin or a smaller amount of glycerin.
    https://archive.usgs.gov/archive/sit...h/NCDElure.htm

    And lanolin turns up in supply sources as a base for making lures.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  115. #115
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Quote Originally Posted by NudeRanch View Post
    ... I applied a generous coat to tubes of Salsa Fargo, and it really smells strongly of lanolin (gamey)...
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    No.
    But that doesn't mean there isn't something to it.

    ... there was no discernible smell left once the aerosol smell evaporated away. None of the pets showed any interest in the bike, spray can or drippings - nor my hands. ...
    wow
    definite smell
    Left the can in the back of the van in the sun.
    • I'm just back from some more work on another of those kids' bikes. This included applying a tiny bit of Fluid Film to some parts (a few bolts, rims, spokes). Occasional smell coming and going. Went, "what's that smell?"
    • Sprayed a fresh bit of Fluid Film out onto a bit of paper towel. Very gamy smell, almost trying to be putrid. Smell lingers in the air for a while, then subsides. Smell on hands subsides.
    • Pets showed no interest nor aversion to it. No discernible reaction at all. Not even to check it out. I find that very odd, as they'll check out most new smells; however, the previously treated bikes are in the same yard.
    • Hands washed clean with soap and water, no smell.

    I have no idea if the in-sun bake caused or enhanced the smell, or if I somehow missed it the first time using Fluid Film. Considering how distinct the smell is, I can't imagine missing it, but who knows.

    • Rusty parts treated the other day look great and work great. No discernible smell.
    • Wiped in a tiny bit of Fluid Film to a new brake cable before running it through a new housing. I know this one will be in the rain, with the housing end facing up, so we'll see if it gets water pooling in the bottom loop of the housing and rusting like the last one. Cable is a jagwire die-extruded stainless left over from a box I had. Housing is CGX-SL. We'll see how long it lasts with that abuse.
    • Found references to using Fluid Film on motorcycle chains. They liked it. No longevity reports.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  116. #116
    mtbr member
    Reputation: socal_jack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,439
    Great experiment! Seems to back up my at best mixed results with Frame Saver especially in my ROS9, seatpost fit is not as tight in that one and get some water intrusion thru stress relief slit on front side of the seat tube. Original owner also seemed to have submerged the frame as water came out of chainstays and rust everywhere else but pretty easy clean or rust reformer application thru frame holes and buffed out the inside of the seatpost a bit with a Dremel. But it was a cheap score on ebay.

    Nabbed a can of Fluid Film yesterday at O'Reilly auto and treated the ROS9 and ROS9+ this morning. Didn't detect any "gamey" smell(at least not the like the shit I've killed and/or field dressed) just the lanolin smell. Had switched to a combo of marine grease and wax based lubricants.
    Canfield R1OT SS
    ROS9+ SS
    ROS9 SS
    GT Peace 9R SS

  117. #117
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,088
    Any follow up on using Fluid Film inside a frame. Any unforeseen issues using it in that application?

    Have a new frame and deciding on Frame Saver which I already have, or to try Fluid Film.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  118. #118
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ferrstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by racefit View Post
    Any follow up on using Fluid Film inside a frame. Any unforeseen issues using it in that application?
    I use the 360 degree nozzles. They should be long enough to feed into the larger tubes by accessing through the head tube or bottom bracket. Otherwise I just use the straw tip on the drian holes of the smaller tubes.

    Fluid Film Extension Wand

  119. #119
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Quote Originally Posted by racefit View Post
    Any follow up on using Fluid Film inside a frame. Any unforeseen issues using it in that application? Have a new frame and deciding on Frame Saver which I already have, or to try Fluid Film.
    Well, where you will be using the bike?

    If along the ocean with salt water, I'd be wanted something with better than Frame Saver to protect my new frame. Also if used where there are salts in the soil or if it's acidic, or if the bike will be stored outdoors frequently (yard at home or bike rack at work?).

    Fluid Film. Just the smell. Used as described above on chains, it smells up the whole area of the deck. Over the summer, the smell quickly dissipated and the chains only smell if you wipe your finger on the chain and smell it. Trapped inside a frame, the smell may persist more.

    I'm interested in trying the WD40 Long Term Corrosion Inhibitor. Way better than Frame Saver in the test, almost as good as Fluid Film, no smell. Note that the smell may have been caused by my leaving the can in a van where it got sun-baked.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  120. #120
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Quote Originally Posted by ferrstein View Post
    I use the 360 degree nozzles. ...
    That wand looks great!

    Have you experienced any smell with Fluid Film?
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  121. #121
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,989
    After reading through this whole thread, I've determined it's much easier to buy a carbon or aluminum framed bike.

  122. #122
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Quote Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
    After reading through this whole thread, I've determined it's much easier to buy a carbon or aluminum framed bike.
    ... because you've never seen aluminum corrode?
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  123. #123
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    That wand looks great!

    Have you experienced any smell with Fluid Film?
    I haven't personally used it on bikes, but use it on other things that stay outside. I have never thought the 'smell' was a issue. It does have a distinctive scent, but until being mentioned here, I never thought about it.

  124. #124
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,989
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    ... because you've never seen aluminum corrode?
    No. Because I don't have to add any treatment to my frame.

  125. #125
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    I'm pretty much convinced my can smelling extremely gamy, almost putrid, is due to my leaving it in the van in the sun. There was some scent prior to that, but I didn't really pay attention to it. After being baked in the sun, it's pretty hard to ignore...
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  126. #126
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ferrstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    That wand looks great!

    Have you experienced any smell with Fluid Film?
    I haven't. I've been using it for years on my cars. My wife complains a bit if I get too much overspray on the exhaust... but that goes away after a few days.

  127. #127
    mtbr member
    Reputation: toadmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    163
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    ... because you've never seen aluminum corrode?
    Aluminum Oxide creates a protective layer in most cases.

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

  128. #128
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    151
    Fluid Film Rust Protection


    The above product is a much thicker version of what the spray can holds; must be applied with a brush or swab, did see a picture of an open can that was tipped over, product was not flowing out.

    Looks like the proper solution for any who want to coat the inner parts of a seat tube. Personally, have not used the AR version.
    "Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway" John Wayne

  129. #129
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Quote Originally Posted by toadmeister View Post
    Aluminum Oxide creates a protective layer in most cases.
    Yup. Standard 'lawn-chair' protection.
    Then you add salt water, or soil salts, acids and water, or even humidity. Depends.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  130. #130
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    195
    What should I use on my carbon frame?

    Carbon fiber is indeed affected by salt water. I kid you not. (Link to another MTBR thread.)

    I continue to be drawn to this subject. I found a few products like Salt Away and Salt Terminator and I wonder about their effectiveness? Boaters seem to like the products. Does anybody use any such product for ocean beach fatbike riding or winter salt country bike commutes?

    Then I happened upon the site clearroads.org which is for road equipment that spreads salt and corrosion management on highway maintenance equipment. One pdf paper stands out and has some recommendations about page 60.

    Well, just keepin the topic alive as we approach another winter with salty roads in the forcast.

  131. #131
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MartinS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,521
    Very interesting test!
    I was wondering if anyone else has had any experience with ACF 50? I used to work with a frame builder back in the 80's that was a big fan of the stuff - recommended to him by an airplane mechanic, apparently developed for aerospace and salt water exposure. I remember soaking some rusted parts in it once and it dissolved all the rust off leaving clean shiny metal. I don't know how it would compare to some of the other stuff, they might be newer and better.
    They claim that it offers 2 years of rust protection. Had a google and found their website if anyone is interested.

    https://learchem.com/products/acf-50.html

  132. #132
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    19
    I used LPS3 on the bottom of my car and it has held up very well.

    I moved down to FL and brought my bike. It is getting all rusty as I have had to keep it on my roof rack for a month and I am right next to the ocean in Fort Walton Beach/Destin/Navarre. I wanted to get something to help prevent rust on the bearings, hardware, pedals and such. I know FF is fairly tacky and see WD-40 corrosion inhibitor is also tacky. I was going to go get a bottle of the WD40 corrosion inhibitor and apply with a rag so it will be a thin coat and hopefully the sand that I have to ride thru here will not stick to it. IDK if there is any other product that would be better or if I just need to get my bike off my roof and stored inside...


    Maybe I will use some car wax for or Bioshield.

  133. #133
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    aviator79, You bring up an important scenario. I’m liking your idea about wiping product on components...

    I personally don’t have any wisdom to contribute. Any coastal riders reading this? Please chime in with ideas.

    I would recommend regularly cleaning off fresh/new/surface corrosion with steel wool and penetrating oil. Followed by a wipe of corrosion treatment. A waxy product or maybe a silicone product might be well suited in order to not make the bikes externals greasy to the touch.

  134. #134
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    53
    for bearing and torqued surfaces I use copper grease
    for chain lube I use paraffin
    for metal finishes, plastic, and rubber parts I use fluid film
    for leather I use sno seal wax

    after eight Maine winters hanging on the bike rack, rolling over beach sand, and splashing through the ocean, my bike shows no evidence of corrosion or other deterioration.

  135. #135
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    That’s what I’m talkin’ bout! ^^^^

  136. #136
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeetheviking View Post
    ... I would recommend regularly cleaning off fresh/new/surface corrosion with steel wool and penetrating oil...
    for bikes: no, no and no
    You're rarely dealing with raw metal, and which you don't want to rough the surface of for more dirt/salt/water to reside, and you don't want to wear the metal away. It's going to damange the paint too, which is your primary protection, with the same surface roughing consequences.
    Note that a recomended treatment for rusty chrome is vigorious wiping with "tinfoil" (aliminum foil). I assume that the aluminum is softer than the chrome but harder than the rust. I've seen the result, which looks good, but I haven't tried it myself.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikeetheviking View Post
    ... Followed by a wipe of corrosion treatment. A waxy product or maybe a silicone product might be well suited in order to not make the bikes externals greasy to the touch.
    • Waxoyl "soft wax" would be a good choice, if expensive. It was my goto on cars, but I'm rethinking that with the Fluid Film.
    • I used Bike Spirits Spray Cleaner & Polish on a cloth to wipe down bike tubes, spokes & rims, just to have some protection. I like it.
    • My rear wheel's dork-protector got rubbed with beeswax as an experiment - seems to work.
    • With the salt used on the roads & bike paths in winter where I am, I'll be switching to Fluid Film.

    On the friend's kids' rusty bikes, I used a tiny abount of Fluid Film on paper towels or a rag, and wiped the tubes down. It soaked into the surface rust (as when sprayed, it soaked into the rusty chains), and cracks in the paint, and was largely wiped off of the painted surface. Rims too. It's not attracting dirt (lanolin is known for resisting dirt adhesion), but I'm not in a dusty area, so no info on that.

    That ACF 50 look interesting. It's got a track record on aircraft structures, so I can't see it having any negative affect on bikes.
    Depending on availability & price, I'd be trying some for around electrical parts of the car. Its penetrating properities looks good, but Fluid Film is also known for penetrating.
    They also have a Corrision Block product, for use around salt water.
    https://learchem.com/products/corrosion-block.html

    p.s.
    I got a fresh can of Fluid Film to treat. It does have a gamey smell, but no where near as strong as, nor any of the foul smell of, the can I left in the van that got baked in the sun.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  137. #137
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Six months down the trail, Look at Fluid Film go!
    Adhering beautifully to the walls inside the head tube of my Waltworks

    And no signs of any corrosion whatsoever

    Anti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_6852.jpgAnti-Corrosion product shootout!-img_6851.jpg
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  138. #138
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    103
    I’m a big advocate for Fluid Film and it’s highly praised in the Jeep world which is what i use it primarily for. I recently started using it on my bike from watching this thread. Great field test and appreciate the leg work.

  139. #139
    one chain, two sprockets
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    338
    Quote Originally Posted by aviator79 View Post
    ...and see WD-40 corrosion inhibitor is also tacky. I was going to go get a bottle of the WD40 corrosion inhibitor...

    Yeah, stop right there! WD40 is pretty much useless as a lubricant or rust inhibitor. The "WD" stands for water displacement. The only real good use for WD40 is drying your distributor and rotor after your truck stalls from a stream crossing.

  140. #140
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    WD-40 corrosion inhibitor is a newish product from that company. It is much different than the original WD-40

  141. #141
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,611
    It's clear that FF is great for metals. It's been stated it is fine on some other materials as well. Can anyone definitively say if it is safe to use on carbon fiber frames and parts? I have a can on the way I'm looking forward to trying, but I'd like to know if I can use directly on the carbon fiber frame...

    [edit] to clarify, I'd mostly intend on using as a way to keep the frame clean and looking good. Some added protection, but not necessarily worrying about corrosion.

  142. #142
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    7,697
    Quote Originally Posted by Wish I Were Riding View Post
    It's clear that FF is great for metals. It's been stated it is fine on some other materials as well. Can anyone definitively say if it is safe to use on carbon fiber frames and parts? I have a can on the way I'm looking forward to trying, but I'd like to know if I can use directly on the carbon fiber frame...


    [edit] to clarify, I'd mostly intend on using as a way to keep the frame clean and looking good. Some added protection, but not necessarily worrying about corrosion.


    Fluid Film is meant for use on metal stuff to provide lubrication and corrosion protection.

    Your carbon frame is most likely painted, then clear coated. A basic carnauba car wax makes a great paint protector that sheds water and dirt. FF is NOT what your looking for.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  143. #143
    EAT MORE GRIME
    Reputation: 127.0.0.1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    5,140
    boeshield for carbon fiber is perfect
    it was designed for use in aluminum and carbon composite airframes originally
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  144. #144
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Fluid Film is meant for use on metal stuff to provide lubrication and corrosion protection.

    Your carbon frame is most likely painted, then clear coated. A basic carnauba car wax makes a great paint protector that sheds water and dirt. FF is NOT what your looking for.
    Exactly!
    Who knows what its solvents would do.

    If you're thinking protecting various metal parts, with some leaking onto or in contact with the carbon fibre, you'd have to get some carbon fibre to test with, and that's set-up with the same resin as yours, and is stripped of wax, and do a test. How would you do that test so you know you wouldn't be out on the trail thinking you're good, only to reach the time-required-for-failure...

    I wouldn't even trust bees wax on carbon fibre without testing or a valid report on testing. There's some galvanic erosion that can take place, so anything (everything?) is suspect until proven otherwise?

    Contact the frame manufacturer to find out what you can use on the metal bits that won't void their frame warranty?

    What might be compatible (costs more and is harder to get) is Waxoyl's "soft wax". Again, the solvents. But it's used inside vehicle doors with their plastics, so I'd guess it maybe might be a better place to start from. No idea on its use around carbon fibre.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  145. #145
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    boeshield for carbon fiber is perfect
    it was designed for use in aluminum and carbon composite airframes originally
    I'd verify that, and consider forwarding that verification to the frame manufacturer asking if you can use that and it won't void their warranty?
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  146. #146
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    7,697
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    I'd verify that, and consider forwarding that verification to the frame manufacturer asking if you can use that and it won't void their warranty?
    We don't know if we're talking about treating the frame internally or externally? I assumed externally in which case your treating paint not carbon.

    Mr. Wish- just leave your carbon frame alone. It most likely came with a warranty, don't mess that up based on a conversation about metal protection. Just keep it away from rock impacts and ride the snot out of it.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  147. #147
    EAT MORE GRIME
    Reputation: 127.0.0.1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    5,140
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    I'd verify that, and consider forwarding that verification to the frame manufacturer asking if you can use that and it won't void their warranty?
    Raoul Luescher says use Boeshield in CF frames. this dude
    knows carbon fiber, he is an aerospace engineer in composites

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNd8MoWRnr8

    He seems to know CF bikes frames extremely well.

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCY9...4lLOHpb_zbIedQ

    see 5:55 where he speaks of boeshield being great for the job in CF frames
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6a5G...pyjvHmy4E5spj5
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  148. #148
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    2
    Results of my test:
    5 cruddy bikes were stored outside in the rain and sun since November.
    All of these bikes had every metal wearable surface sprayed down or
    wiped down with the triple combination of Boeshield T-9, LPS-3, and
    ACF-50. This solution was also injected under pressure into all
    bowden cables for brakes and shifters. Pedal bearings, BB's, and hubs
    also received this solution injected under pressure. One of these
    bikes is such a piece of junk none of my friends wanted to ride it, so
    it has sat all winter. All 4 other bikes were occasionally ridden,
    including through small creeks and fields of mud with no washing them
    off. The cruddy Huffy 3" tire bike (Huffy's attempt at a fat tire
    bike) recieved the worst abuse. In February, it was carried on a car
    bike rack through mountain passes that had snowstorms and freezing
    temps all the way to the coast, it was then ridden through the surf on
    the beach after a dog, and then it was not washed. More lube was
    added. No freshwater wash occurred, except for alternating rain and
    snow on the drive back. . Once back, it has been ridden mercilessly,
    through mud, wet grass, and rain and snow. Not washed once. Beach
    sand is still visibly clinging to parts of the bike, along with great
    gobs of mud. No Rust on this bike.

    No rust has developed on ANY bike, or chain. All shifters and brakes
    work as well as they did when new (these are all Walmart bikes, so
    very poorly). The bike that sat unused since November.needed the
    tires re-inflated, and water dumped out of the frame, but rides like
    new.

  149. #149
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeetheviking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    300
    Ok guys,

    It's been roughly 9 months of regular all conditions trail riding/creek crossings etc.

    Tore down my crankset and bottom bracket today to inspect the happenings inside of the BB shell. As expected the fluid film was still adhering to all surfaces beautifully. When I wiped the film off with a rag, I exposed mint corrosion free tubing. Eat your heart out.

    Name:  IMG_8479.jpg
Views: 1462
Size:  61.0 KB
    Mikee Likes It! :cool:
    @gordosbicycleclub

  150. #150
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    LOL

    Fluid Film is keeping the previously rusty chains it freed up still working. Doesn't appear to be any new rust. I haven't measured for wear/stretch...
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  151. #151
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bakerjw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    681
    Kind of digging up a zombie thread here.

    My wife and I got back from Canada with our Chromoly steel coupled mountain tandem. When I first assembled it, I had not treated it so after this weekends thorough cleaning of EVERYTHING, S&S couplers included, I decided to treat the inner parts of the frame with one of the typical rust preventatives.

    A few years back at our LBS, before they closed, there was a local guy using Fluid Film to treat his bike frame. I found Fluid Film locally and had planned on using it. I then came across this thread and am sold.

    @MikeeTheViking needs to be given a title of "Creator of one of the most useful threads ever!"
    Help chart the mountains at www.appalachianbiketrails.org

  152. #152
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    151
    "Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway" John Wayne

  153. #153
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    [U]Krown was my goto for vehicles many years ago, as it worked well enough for a vehicle that had lots of cracks & seams that already had salt & wet in them already, as it would wick in. One farmer outside of town had space to put a vehicle up on a hoist, spray the underside and leave it there to dry over a weekend, then he'd apply the Krown. Friends had that for all their vehicles. Worked well enough, but every vehicle treated with it still rusted away, just somewhat slower. My use of Krown got surpassed by Waxoyl well over a decade ago, after someone gave me a VW that had the full Waxoyl treatment back in '84 and it was still going in the salt.

    I've no idea if that product you linked to is the same as Krown sold before, but with the results I'm getting with Fluid Film, I wouldn't even give a can of Krown a try. I know Fluid Film works really really well. I don't want to apply something that may allow some damage or I end up having to remove later to apply FF.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  154. #154
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,064
    Winter's here/coming in the North, along with some salty roads.

    <BUMP>
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  155. #155
    high pivot witchcraft
    Reputation: mtnbkrmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    3,722
    I just built a Unit for my dedicated winter commuter bike. Based on this thread I used Fluid Film.

    Based on *OneSpeed*’s advice, I waxed the f out of that frame before it saw any duty.

    So far so good...
    2020 Kona Unit
    2019 Forbidden Druid
    2018 Kona Honzo ST 30th BDay SE
    2015 Kona Paddy Wagon Fixed Gear

Similar Threads

  1. Carbon cranks and frames and corrosion from salt water.
    By hanzo111 in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-16-2018, 01:22 PM
  2. Help! Corrosion on Aluminum frame...
    By Puzman in forum Riding Passion
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 09-12-2012, 04:40 PM
  3. Handlebar corrosion?
    By LoneReaction in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-02-2011, 04:18 PM
  4. Steel corrosion on Salsa El Mar?
    By tictac778 in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-21-2011, 05:23 PM
  5. Help! Corrosion on 575...
    By Puzman in forum Yeti
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 01-06-2011, 08:41 PM

Members who have read this thread: 66

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.