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  1. #101
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    MikeC really has ridden in Alaska unsupported. Not saying his opinion is everything, but he knows a lot about riding bikes in snow.
    I hope we keep getting bigger tire options and bikes that can use them, I’m burnt out on skiing and fat biking has saved me from hating winter. Where I live we need pretty big tires for float because we get cold low moisture snow and bigger means more days on the bike!

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by wookieone View Post
    MikeC really has ridden in Alaska unsupported. Not saying his opinion is everything, but he knows a lot about riding bikes in snow.
    I hope we keep getting bigger tire options and bikes that can use them, I’m burnt out on skiing and fat biking has saved me from hating winter. Where I live we need pretty big tires for float because we get cold low moisture snow and bigger means more days on the bike!
    Maybe WE need you to come up with an attachement a 6 in x14 in ski to strap on the front tire to open the trails after a snowfall and just take it off when firm enough?

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    Maybe WE need you to come up with an attachement a 6 in x14 in ski to strap on the front tire to open the trails after a snowfall and just take it off when firm enough?
    Or you could just buy one:

    https://www.fatbikeskis.com/

    Strapping a ski to the tire would present a host of problems.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    I have this thing called a full time job and am not going to spend the time and effort documenting the time I spend riding a bicycle.

    Me hopeless? Have you ever bothered to research the Iditrod trail or follow the sled dog or snowmobile race? See there are these things called check points that are conveniently located in these things called villages or proper towns. The trail is used by the locals to travel back and forth between settlements all winter before the races even start. So no, he did not ride a self supported trip on the packed down and marked trail. He mailed things to himself in advance, resupplyed at the settlements and slept inside heated dwellings when available and even ate hot food that was available. How the fuk do you think the first competitors raced on normal sized MTB tires when the race first started if it wasn’t packed down from all the snowmobile and dog team traffic? Just like the Iron Dog and Iditarod racers stay in dwellings along the trail, the same thing is available to the bicycle racers, skiers and walkers. Their problem is they can’t make the distance between many of the checkpoints and have to sleep in a tent on occasion but it’s nothing like the trip the one guy recently completed transversing Antarctica, unsupported with no one or anything out there.
    I have one of those full time jobs as well, so when people with vastly more experience and knowledge riding bikes in snow than I take the time to document and comment on this stuff, I listen a little more than I would the average poster here.

    And yes, I've researched and followed the race for many years(going back to the days of welding rims together), and some of your comments are correct, others are not.

    First, Mike rode the length of the Iditarod trail fully self supported once. He did not step foot in any building, checkpoint etc., he carried everything he needed for the entire journey from the start, including all of his food(no drop bags sent ahead), and slept outside every night. That's what 'fully self supported' means. If you bothered to read the link I posted you would have known that.

    As for the race itself, Mike has completed that a number of times as well, holding the course record at one point. The human powered race starts well before the sled dog race, and therefore conditions are extremely variable. The trail packers don't come through until just before the dogs to ensure it's packed for them. The human powered racers may enjoy a nice hard trail(more prevalent in the last 5 years), or they may encounter totally new or windblown snow which has the bikers walking for days. The dogs usually catch the people doing the full trail at some point, and that sometimes improves the conditions for them, sometimes not. You are correct about the racers using checkpoints and drop bags though.

    It baffles me that people don't at least listen to people like that instead of just dismissing what he writes. Yeah, his tone can be dickish sometimes when people post stupid stuff, but hey, it's the internet! Think about what he's saying and where/how he rides, see if it applies to you, even try it out, and then make your own decision.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    Maybe WE need you to come up with an attachement a 6 in x14 in ski to strap on the front tire to open the trails after a snowfall and just take it off when firm enough?
    But what about the back wheel???

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny View Post
    But what about the back wheel???
    The ski will levitate the whole bike! it's like magic.

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny View Post
    But what about the back wheel???
    https://youtu.be/kYmTPqFMkvs?t=16

  8. #108
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    beat meet to the post BlueCheese

    Página oficial KtraK España Portugal Andorra

    I don't think they're fat though...
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post

    I don't think they're fat though...
    I recall girls in college having a debate over length vs girth... Ktrak accomplishes it with length.

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    beat meet to the post BlueCheese

    Página oficial KtraK España Portugal Andorra

    I don't think they're fat though...
    I have a friend locally that had a ktrak approximately 10 years ago before fatbikes were a thing (in their present form at least). I tried it a few time, and it really was pretty useless. It could do Ok on a groomed skateski trail, but it once it encountered soft snow and/or significant inclines it was terrible. The handling was also very tricky on a narrow trail - there was no rail corners at high speed!

    This concept has been tried so many times and it just doesn't work. Current fatibkes far exceed these contraptions.

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Comfisherman View Post
    Wait, are we arguing that Mike, the guy with the custom frame with 217 axles doesn't want bigger tires?

    Trying to track this thread,

    - big heavy tire that doesn't actually exist
    -old Canadian guy on a oddly sized Helga wears his shoes out with grip studs
    -odd general angst against Mike, narrow tires, fat tires, life in general.

    Had a question for espen, didn't want to derail thread. Not possible to get any weirder so I'll ask anyway.

    Espen, when vee sent they prototype 2xls did the manufacture them in a traditional manner? I.e. did the machine a billet die for that size carcass already? Or do they have another means of doing the small one offs like 3d printing on the casing?
    Not sure about the details on the making of the mold, but I was told that they modified the original mold used for the protos (315mm bead-bead) so that it would produce the smaller sized production ones (still massively bigger than anything else at approx. 298mm bead-bead). Ie. a production ''3XL'' would require a new mold.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny View Post
    But what about the back wheel???
    I understand that this would not float across a 50 feet river.
    It could give an edge when the conditions are a bit soft.
    Focussing on the front would bypass the limits imposed by the frame
    so it could be sold to many fatbike owners.
    Just imagine some use 3.8 tires for speed but when a friend calls to ride
    it would be a bit like if you had a pair of 4.8 to fallow a person
    riding 4.8
    It s a numbers game, get enough buyers to lower the production cost
    then you offer something interesting at an interesting price.

    It would also cover the 26 and the 27.5 in.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny View Post
    I have one of those full time jobs as well, so when people with vastly more experience and knowledge riding bikes in snow than I take the time to document and comment on this stuff, I listen a little more than I would the average poster here.

    And yes, I've researched and followed the race for many years(going back to the days of welding rims together), and some of your comments are correct, others are not.

    First, Mike rode the length of the Iditarod trail fully self supported once. He did not step foot in any building, checkpoint etc., he carried everything he needed for the entire journey from the start, including all of his food(no drop bags sent ahead), and slept outside every night. That's what 'fully self supported' means. If you bothered to read the link I posted you would have known that.

    As for the race itself, Mike has completed that a number of times as well, holding the course record at one point. The human powered race starts well before the sled dog race, and therefore conditions are extremely variable. The trail packers don't come through until just before the dogs to ensure it's packed for them. The human powered racers may enjoy a nice hard trail(more prevalent in the last 5 years), or they may encounter totally new or windblown snow which has the bikers walking for days. The dogs usually catch the people doing the full trail at some point, and that sometimes improves the conditions for them, sometimes not. You are correct about the racers using checkpoints and drop bags though.

    It baffles me that people don't at least listen to people like that instead of just dismissing what he writes. Yeah, his tone can be dickish sometimes when people post stupid stuff, but hey, it's the internet! Think about what he's saying and where/how he rides, see if it applies to you, even try it out, and then make your own decision.
    This exactly! Well except for the part about the full time job as I'm old enough to have stopped doing that.
    Latitude 61

  14. #114
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    Ooh, midwinter Iditarod fights!

    It should be noted that 70-100lb bikes aren't going to float worth a damn and .5" wider tires is probably not going to make a huge difference. It's entirely possible that you may end up pushing your 5.5" tires a long long way where some lighter and easier rolling tires would make a difference (while pushing).

    At some point, the logistics of riding a bike don't make sense anymore. I think the south pole attempts are a pretty good example of this. People on skis almost always make progress compared to someone pushing a bike, whereas with the bike there is so much drag and friction with the sled on the compacted snow. Fighting 80mph winds and massive drag, a bit bigger and heavier tires may just drag you down even more. I haven't seen anyone do this "well" or in a way that I think could be sustainable. Lots of people just end up dragging their bike in a sled. That should tell you something.

    Tire with and PSI can be the difference between riding and walking, but there are a bunch more factors that you can't control that may make riding completely impossible. My impressions from the racer's bikes is that the tire width above 4.5" is not a definitive advantage. A lot of the route is on fairly hardpack routes on the Yukon river and across the Norton Sound. This can change with one storm obviously, but large sections like the backside of the Alaska range and others are notorious for light coverage or no coverage. The wind here can totally strip places of snow (and deposit it elsewhere). Soft conditions and pushing may be (and probably will be) encountered, but think about it, if we aren't talking about hardpack, fat tires will only work in a few inches of new snow when it's not 250+lbs of rider and bike. You can't control the snowstorms to ensure that just the right amount of snow is deposited. Sitting here at home, I can decide when to ride when I know there's a chance the snow will support my bike and otherwise, I'll break out the snowshoes to pack the trails.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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