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  1. #1
    wjh
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    4.8" tire vs bluto

    I currently run a 100mm Bluto RL. its old, probably needs rebuilt, and i would like to lighten the bike up with a carbon fork. I know a 4.8 tire wont replace suspension, but i don't jump or ride very aggressively. Would the addition of a 4.8 tire provide a reasonable compromise on roots, rocks and similar terrain? It is a 4 season bike as well.
    Anybody tried the same?
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjh View Post
    I currently run a 100mm Bluto RL. its old, probably needs rebuilt, and i would like to lighten the bike up with a carbon fork. I know a 4.8 tire wont replace suspension, but i don't jump or ride very aggressively. Would the addition of a 4.8 tire provide a reasonable compromise on roots, rocks and similar terrain? It is a 4 season bike as well.
    Anybody tried the same?
    Thanks
    Try the lockout with reduced pressure on the Bluto if you already have a 4.8 tire, and that will give you a better sense of what you'd miss. I have both carbon forks and a Bluto. You can ride either, but the Bluto certainly is a lot more stable in rock gardens and even small drops, and the biggest difference is roots or step ups.
    Dash Pt. State Park (Tacoma), Big Sky Montana during Snowboard Season, Duluth Mn, a couple of times of year incl. Xmas.

  3. #3
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    Rigid is rigid. As in, it's rigid. Suspension forks rule.

  4. #4
    turtles make me hot
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    I ride my 907 rigid year round with 4.8" tires. I have the pressure dialed in to what works on different trails in different conditions. I don't even try a Bluto because I'm big and heavy. I tested one once and knew it wasn't or me.
    I have a couple of small jumps on my local trail and the rigid fattie handles them with grace and ease.
    I like turtles

  5. #5
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    I have my rigid front tire at 3 psi and never miss a suspension fork for riding you describe.
    when i started out (at 7 psi or so) I thought I need one.

    It also is a lot about technique, like loading and unloading etc.

    I never used a Bluto, but think less noodling is another benefit of rigid.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
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  6. #6
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    Well I am facing the same dillema here, but my additional question is..if I am about 100Kg, can I still go with the Rockhox or will I end up with permanent "lockout" and is better to go with the rigid..? Is it still fun to use the Bluto with my type of weight?

  7. #7
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    I think the rigid v not rigid thing is a bit overblown on a fat bike. Sure a fat tire is not as good as a suspension fork but it's not like some 2.1" rigid tire bike from days of yore either. Dialed in it can provide some suspension, whether it is enough for how you ride is a call each person needs to make for themselves.

    That said as to the implied question, will a 4.8" tire make much difference over a 4" tire? I suspect the subset of people that would be able to feel a big improvement is pretty small.
    Latitude 61

  8. #8
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    [QUOTE=sryanak;

    That said as to the implied question, will a 4.8" tire make much difference over a 4" tire? I suspect the subset of people that would be able to feel a big improvement is pretty small.[/QUOTE]

    I love semantics:

    YMMV but I'm pretty small and I feel a big improvement in trail riding, not so much on snow, except for float, but then again I'm on trail much more than on snow.

    It's all a personal thing. Can't really discount a person's preferences once they've tried all available options.

    BTW the new Wozo 2019 has a Mastodon shock.
    Last edited by Bumpyride; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:11 AM. Reason: A for O
    Dash Pt. State Park (Tacoma), Big Sky Montana during Snowboard Season, Duluth Mn, a couple of times of year incl. Xmas.

  9. #9
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    A 4.8 will add a tiny bit more cushion than a 4.0, but not likely to be the difference you are looking for. The 4.8 will also have a better roll over, than a 4.0, but again may or may not be enough to keep you happy. It was mentioned dropping the air pressure is key. Remember if you go to low, a lot of tires will then start self steering. So to know you will have to try it. Demo, borrow, or lockout as wisely mentioned above. I've tried both, and rigid didn't work for me because the tire movement had no damping, and bounced me all over the trail. I had to slow down too much too stay in control. If you are all about a slow enjoyable ride it may work for you!
    RAM speed: UP, UP, and away....!

  10. #10
    Rollin' a fatty Moderator
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    When I got my bike it was rigid (Al) with 4.0s, in the snow was ok but was a pain to ride in the summer, enter the Bluto.

    Since the Bluto I go between Bud/Lou 4.8 from the late fall to early spring (snow and mud seasons) and Minion 4.0 for the rest of the year. Like both but enjoy the 4.0's more prolly because the riding pace increases when the mud dries up. Tire pressure makes a ton of difference thru the whole year, takes a while to figure out what pressures work for you so take your time a tinker until you find the sweet spot.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kikinki View Post
    Well I am facing the same dillema here, but my additional question is..if I am about 100Kg, can I still go with the Rockhox or will I end up with permanent "lockout" and is better to go with the rigid..? Is it still fun to use the Bluto with my type of weight?
    I am at about 104kg (230lbs) and i have a bluto and rigid. the bluto has its limitations but for me in the midwest it is perfect. we don't have long down hill stuff and all the tech sections are easily handled by the bluto. the biggest change i made was the bottomless tokens. i went to 4 on a 100mm travel fork. that made a world of difference. i was bottoming out on everything unless i went with like 250psi (close to max whatever that was). the ride sucked but it kept it from bottoming. with the tokens i am down to around 160psi and actually have small bump suspension. i also never use more than half the travel and never lock it out.

    some people will disagree but the lighter weight of the bluto is also nice. if you dont have to run the beefier forks for aggressive trails i would suggest the bluto

  12. #12
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    If you are new to rigid riding, donít expect miracles from a fat tire. You will feel the terrain almost as much as riding rigid on a normal 2.2in tire.

    Personally, I like my new fat bike with a rigid fork, but then I raced a rigid singlespeed for about 10 years before getting front suspension (when I turned 52 years old). For me getting back to rigid with the Suzi Q is like getting reacquainted with an old friend. I absolutely love it. And on snow, it will be even better.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SS
    RM Suzi Q 90 RSL
    KHS Team 29
    S-Works Roubaix
    KHS CX 550 cyclocross

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjh View Post
    I currently run a 100mm Bluto RL. its old, probably needs rebuilt, and i would like to lighten the bike up with a carbon fork. I know a 4.8 tire wont replace suspension, but i don't jump or ride very aggressively. Would the addition of a 4.8 tire provide a reasonable compromise on roots, rocks and similar terrain? It is a 4 season bike as well.
    Anybody tried the same?
    Thanks
    It depends. If you are trying to go fast then no, a fat tire alone will still ride poorly compared to a suspension fork. Kinda like a bouncing basketball. But, if you are taking it easy over the really rough stuff then I think rigid is the way to go. My bike is rigid and I like it that way. No fork maintenance, precise steering and no bobbing or power loss when you are really cranking on it in deep snow or on wind drifted trails.

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