2019 fatbike state of the union.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    2019 fatbike state of the union.

    No secret that fatbikes have faded back to a more realistic place within most bike shops. That surge a few years ago represented manufacturers wanting to get into the game to sell units, and didn't accurately reflect the number of consumers truly interested in the niche.

    Now that we're back to reality, how do you see fatbikes being used (not marketed) and improved going forward?

    More width in rims and tires?

    Focus on lighter package weight with existing rim/tire sizes?

    Different geometry?

    E-assist?

    Moving forward, what sorts of (realistic) improvements are you hoping to see in 2, 5, 10 years?

    Discuss.

  2. #2
    Rippin da fAt
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    Oh boy, Mikesee's starting us up again!

    Frankly, it's spot on that the demographic was severely misjudged as many thought with a "bandwagon" mentality as they joined the fatolution.

    There will be the brands that stand behind and fully support fat for years to come.
    Minor geometry adjustments and other tweaks will go on, color changes between model years...

    Tire offerings will be dialed along with improvements to casing designs that might take into account the shear dead weight along with improvement if durability.

    Of course, we have all seen the advent of 10, 11 and 12 speed traditional drivetrains along with internal gear hubs morph to be fatbike compatible. Pinion gearboxes with different number of speeds became available.

    We have seen many things go away as well, between brands eliminating fat, brands thinning the herd (Surly) and components being discontinued. Tires by Surly, rims by Surly, and the end of the Moonie...
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
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  3. #3
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    I think focus on lighter package weight with existing wheel/tire sizes, maybe leaning more toward 27.5 Fat.

    Also in the fat bikes marketed more toward trail duties/year round quiver-killer types..... possibly longer front center/reach/slacker HTA tweaks.

    Hopefully some lighter (but still stiff enough) suspension fork options..... but that may be a stretch with the scaling back measures.
    "I ride to clear my head, my head is clearer when I'm riding SS. Therefore, I choose to ride SS."~ Fullrange Drew

  4. #4
    Fatbiker Fatbiking
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    Great questions. Being a realistic pessimist, I see the future as one being a niche brand of bike. A lot of manufacturers leaving the scene due to shrinking sales. I don't see no great revelations within the fat bike industry that we have not seen already. We may already have past Peak Fatbike.

    There will always be a loyal and hard core following such as myself and the folks who populate this particular portion of MTBR. But my purchases have already been made and as such, it's just a matter of upgrading or maintaining what I have. And as I tend to keep my bikes for a very, very long time, bike manufacturers best not depend upon the likes of me!

    If I have one true wish to see done is for the major tire manufacturer's make a fat tire supple enough yet backed with a real puncture proof tire casing such as that found on alot of the Schwalbe touring bike tires.

    E-Assist? Most definitely, one future direction. It totally transforms the fat bike into a vehicle where you can knock down some serious miles under your tires. It doubles the smile factor of the standard fat bike by a great margin. But again, a fat tired ebike is a niche product within a niche grouping. A shame, cause many bicyclists will never truly get that feeling of satisfaction we get when we start rolling those fat tires!

    2019 fatbike state of the union.-100_1875.jpg
    First fatty, Specialized Fatboy. Surly Nice Rear racks, Ortlieb pannier bags, front and rear. Schmidt Dyno hub lighting system. Stock Specialized/Sram drive train. This is the bike that got me hooked on bikes & the idea of going off road, again.

    2019 fatbike state of the union.-100_3812.jpg
    Second fatty, Haibike Full FatSix. Old Man Mountain Phat Sherpa's, front and rear. Tubeless Schwalbes. Stock Shimano drive train. Ortlieb pannier bags for touring. 2 extra 500wh Yamaha batteries for extra range....

    Again, a niche within the niche. But as many of us age out, afflictions occur but the need to get off-road remains the same. This will be the solution for a few of us. Not all, but a few; especially those with the discretionary dollars to make it happen.

    From what I've observed and it's just my opinion, the real manufacturing revoluton ongoing right now is in E-bikes, in particular, E-MTB. Each year, more bike manufacturer's have jumped on the bandwagon. The motor drive manufacturers are in a race to out do the competition in their latest drive motor or battery design and it's carried over to the bike manufacturers redesigning their bikes to meet this techno push....

  5. #5
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    Some of my wish list are realistic. Many are not.

    Realistic:

    - Anti-rotation of bearings without resorting to red threadlocker. I've pedal-unscrewed bottom brackets subzero F, it is not fun at all. Perhaps just a frame tab and a set screw, which is probably asking too much cooperation.
    - Saddles that don't smack sharply in the small of the spine in dab situations where a dropper post can't be requested fast enough (milliseconds). Think like Gonzo from the Muppets.
    - Fine-adjust dropper posts that work subzero F. Some sort of inverted collet, or multiple-tooth array like how Echo trials freewheels work, but in a linear fashion. Just please no more hydraulics.
    - Sort-of-like-a-pogie glove. I call it "the claw". Thin insulation palm side of glove, absurd insulation / spaciousness toward the outside world. Have your heat, let go of bars in crash situation.

    Feasible, but sketchy:

    - Thin flat cranks for better Q. Thinner than the depth of the threads on a pedal axle. Cooperation between crank and pedal manufacturers required for this to work. The pedal axle would have a wide flare that would fit into the crank in a thin/broad way, the overall design of the rest of the pedal would be otherwise the same. I envision cooperation / supply chain problems here, otherwise it is a feasible notion.
    - I'm working on my torque-tolerant-downshift gearbox. It is almost ready. Max width, minimum Q. Almost ready...

    Unrealistic, maybe:

    - Center bar mount gear indicator that is transreflective. My whole childhood was spent with solar calculators that worked like a BOSS in broad daylight, I want to know my gear while pogie equipped, please.
    - Lauf-esque rear suspension without resorting to Thudbuster / without interrupting dropper post utility. This is hard to do.

    HYPER UNREALISTIC:

    - Please please please stop the noises. No more creaks or howls, I will pay through the nose for a quiet bike.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (officialy in 2016, functionally in 2020).

  6. #6
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    Jeez Mike....you really opened the floor to....ummm....I don't know what LOL!
    When I got my first fattie in 2010....you were pretty established here....and not many of us originals left.
    I've seen a lot of stuff come and go....can't imagine what you've seen.

    Ebikes....probably. I'm in my 60s and see that happening eventually.

    Wider tires soon become 1 trick ponies. But for those that actually ride in a lot of snow....yes! (although I have so many wheel/tire setups now)

    Full suspension? With Salsa dropping out....and Trek looking to do the same...that leaves a few small builders.

    Sadly....with every manufacturer working on jamming 160mm travel bikes that have 11" high bottom brackets and 8' long wheel bases down the public's throats is going to stunt many changes to fatties.

  7. #7
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    27.5"x4.5" wheels
    More ebike options
    some minor geometry changes
    Obviously the typical MTB progress in drivetrain, brakes, droppers etc.

    Fatbikes are pretty simple, so not really much to change unless we talk about FS fatbikes. Maybe throw in some hub standard changes just for the sake of it :-)
    Mayor v4
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    Some of my wish list

    I like a man that knows *exactly* what he wants, even if I don't see as much value in his list as I do in my own...

    ...which is very simple:

    -Bigger tires with light tubeless casings and tread apropos to soft snow digging and floating. 26 x 5.6" or 27.5 x 5" at minimum. 120mm wide rims for the former, 105mm for the latter.

    and

    -Gearboxes with a decent range, that work well in the cold, that are sealed against moisture intrusion (so that they can be used in the way fatbikes beg to be used -- off piste) and that don't feel as though one is pedaling them underwater.

  9. #9
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    Are there yet any 120mm rims? My position against making rims (flooded market) has softened with time. I could be talked into making some. I used to think that my small CNC platform would be a limiting factor. The solution is to instead make something like a big, slow, vertical lathe, like a Lazy Susan but with a special stationary cutter. Is there any point to doing this without tires to match? mikesee you've already figured out the elevated chainstay requirements.

    My strategy with gearboxes is to have as little of it as possible. Every contact point is an efficiency loss. My current design constraints can make a 6 speed (2x3) with extremely large clearance for fat tires encrusted in muck at a short chainstay length, or a 9 speed (3x3) in the same general Q factor, albeit with longer chainstay length. After the first iteration I'd like to see teeth faces that have been REM treated. I don't even know how this would affect cost but let us assume "expensive".

    The other challenge is that good sealing (off piste) is also a built-in efficiency loss. I've thought of a "constant ejection" design but, it is, uhhhh.... hehe... it is half baked let's call it that.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (officialy in 2016, functionally in 2020).

  10. #10
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    They always come up with some new"standard" so we all have to buy new parts.
    Slightly wider rims will mean we need fat boost hubs, like 5.5mm wider than current...
    Of course e-everything for the lazy generation.

  11. #11
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    I currently have a slew of Farley Fat bikes and each one has it's purpose.

    I have been riding one of my Fat Bikes at a Road Bike for the last year and have put a couple thousand miles on it. I love riding road with it so much that a month ago I decided to build a Cyclo-Cross Fat bike so I can ride the road to the trails and hit the not so technical stuff just for something a little different.

    If it doesn't work I can always put some flat bars on the bike.

    2019 fatbike state of the union.-2019-07-08-mtb-farley-cyclocross-build-4-large-.jpg
    MJ
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  12. #12
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    I'm loving the chair positioned to admire the bike
    What a perfect waste of time

  13. #13
    Hybrid Leftys aren't real Moderator
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    I feel like we'll not see too much change to fatties now. Just like 29ers when fat and 650B came along, they've languished since the big brands don't feel like they are the prime target for leveraging the foisting off of the maximum number of units.

    What I want? the return of standards.

    One THREADED bottom bracket standard.

    One headset/headtube diameter standard (I'm fine with tapered or 44mm, but do we need both, and then variations within tapered?).

    One freehub body standard (impossible, but a guy can dream).

    The end of internal cable routing.

    Complete cessation of the circle jerk surrounding stiffness. Bikes are stiff enough, parts are stiff enough, stop trying to convince the Joe SixPack average rider that stiffer everything, every year, actually improves their lives.

    Rest of it is basically the same as any other segment in the industry.

    The real change I see coming, is the death of brick and mortar, and leading the charge will be the industry itself, seeking ever increasing profits, in a shrinking market. Consumer direct sales will kill all mid sized shops. Gigantic stores propped up by singular brands will continue to underwhelm with low paid staff and generally no one over the age of 23 working there (except the owner). Small/tiny shops will continue to exist to serve the function of installing parts and doing adjustments that need to be done.

    I was happy with bikes 10 years ago, the ensuing decade brought little to make me think more was needed. Plus bikes was about it, and the industries obsession with putting racer boy types on them, and lapping up their input like hungry cats at a milk bowl, has ruined them with ever shrinking tire volumes, so I have little hope for really interesting stuff moving forward.

    E Bikes are the new darling. Give it 5 years, we'll be at Peak E, and wondering where to go from there.....
    Cannondale Lefty and HeadShock servicing, wheel building, etc...


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  14. #14
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    MendonCycleSmith I hear ya on the stiffness thing, it is easier from a processing standpoint to have a large carbon tube cross section with a thin wall, it is easy to put together and makes for a stiff result up to a certain load point. So it's good for where a lot of frames are being well made in Taiwan et al.

    Is that good for the rider though? More prone to rock strikes. "Well we can make up for that with better resin"... yeah, well, what if you used the modern resin and small, thick tubes, and had super kick ass rock durability? "Well then it would be a heavier result because of (boring reasons) and light stuff sells" rrrrrrr @#$*@#

    That said I think Fatback deserves some praise with what they did with the Corvus. Have your external routing but it doesn't look external from a few feet away, very clever.

    I hope your gloomy predictions of the future of the LBS are wrong. I don't think you're wrong, but I hope you're wrong.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (officialy in 2016, functionally in 2020).

  15. #15
    Hybrid Leftys aren't real Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    MendonCycleSmith I hear ya.
    Had a consumer direct carbon + fame rom the UK in for a build recently.

    You pushed housing into a hole, and it miraculously popped out the appropriate hole, at the other end.

    It was magic, and the frame was $700.

    If the big boys feel it's unimportant, they plainly never actually built bikes before.

    So if it's the small, consumer direct, outside the box/industry mindset "makers" that will *save* us, then yep, bike shops are the next casualty of this war on maximizing profit above all else.

    The whole carbon tube thing you touch on, yep, snake eating its own tail.
    Cannondale Lefty and HeadShock servicing, wheel building, etc...


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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    What I want? the return of standards.

    One THREADED bottom bracket standard.

    One headset/headtube diameter standard (I'm fine with tapered or 44mm, but do we need both, and then variations within tapered?).

    One freehub body standard (impossible, but a guy can dream).

    The end of internal cable routing.

    Complete cessation of the circle jerk surrounding stiffness. Bikes are stiff enough, parts are stiff enough, stop trying to convince the Joe SixPack average rider that stiffer everything, every year, actually improves their lives.

    Rest of it is basically the same as any other segment in the industry.

    The real change I see coming, is the death of brick and mortar, and leading the charge will be the industry itself, seeking ever increasing profits, in a shrinking market. Consumer direct sales will kill all mid sized shops. Gigantic stores propped up by singular brands will continue to underwhelm with low paid staff and generally no one over the age of 23 working there (except the owner). Small/tiny shops will continue to exist to serve the function of installing parts and doing adjustments that need to be done.

    I was happy with bikes 10 years ago, the ensuing decade brought little to make me think more was needed. Plus bikes was about it, and the industries obsession with putting racer boy types on them, and lapping up their input like hungry cats at a milk bowl, has ruined them with ever shrinking tire volumes, so I have little hope for really interesting stuff moving forward.

    E Bikes are the new darling. Give it 5 years, we'll be at Peak E, and wondering where to go from there.....
    I like your list. I'd love to have 3 bikes that could share most parts, but I've never managed that. I would have needed to sell all my existing bikes and buy 3 new ones at the same time to beat the "standards war", but my cash flow/desire for new bike bling has not made that possible. I have managed to stick with external cable routing on all my bikes so there is that.

    Bike shops are dying for a number of reasons. My personal reason for giving up on the LBS is spectacularly bad service in every area of interaction I have with them. I don't mind paying for excellent service, but I can't bear to waste my time and money on folks that know less about what they are doing than I do. So I just buy my own tools and where I don't feel competent enough [wheel building and suspension tuning] I seek out real professionals. I have come across some great LBS on my travels, but sadly none where I live.

    We may reach peak e-bike in 5 years in the sense of most people who want them have them, but I think they'll remain as the dominant form of singletrack machine over mountain bikes in the long-term. As with all other motorsports they'll get faster/lighter/better range/more reliable/etc... I think we'll just see the end of the last era where humans moved themselves around without motors. The powered electric exoskeleton e-hiker/e-runner is next so kids will just assume it's normal to always have power assist to move around and when you tell some youngster that people walked/ran or biked many miles across the planet without power assist they'll think you are crazy. That's just not possible.

    Specifically in terms of fatbikes the one change I would like to see personally is that I am aiming to buy my retirement home up island in Cumberland where they have some snow for part of the year and I'd have a reason to add a fatbike back into the fleet. I've got my GF 38% convinced! I'll keep working on her.
    Safe riding,

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  17. #17
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    I'd forgotten about one thing: On both of my fatbikes (one for snow, one for the rest of the year) I always have to choose between a dropper post or a suspension post. And whichever one I choose I always miss the other.

    No more: https://www.pnwcomponents.com/collec...28488424587341

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I'd forgotten about one thing: On both of my fatbikes (one for snow, one for the rest of the year) I always have to choose between a dropper post or a suspension post. And whichever one I choose I always miss the other.

    No more: https://www.pnwcomponents.com/collec...28488424587341
    Wow! If it works as good as their other droppers....it will be a nice post.

  19. #19
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    ^ That's fantastic. I'd try it. I've been riding a PNW post for about a month and it is really well sorted out. There's a bit of play in the "yaw" direction, but it is not at all noticeable on the bike, only noticed in the shop/exam scenario. It has a fine response at the lever, almost too responsive so I introduced a little slack in the cable on purpose. The return speed is just right, quick but not kick-you-in-the-goods quick. I have no cold weather experience on it.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (officialy in 2016, functionally in 2020).

  20. #20
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    I'd like to see more Bfat options with 83mm BBs like the Otso Voytek or RMB SuziQ.... and of course an easy fit for 29+.

    That suspension dropper just came at me like an idea long thought and discussed to be the holy grail of seatposts just comin' in the back door like "Hey guys, what you thinkin' 'bout?" ... Wow is my vote too Mayor.

    27.2 as an option is nice, price seems reasonable.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    -Bigger tires with light tubeless casings and tread apropos to soft snow digging and floating. 26 x 5.6" or 27.5 x 5" at minimum. 120mm wide rims for the former, 105mm for the latter.

    and

    -Gearboxes with a decent range, that work well in the cold, that are sealed against moisture intrusion (so that they can be used in the way fatbikes beg to be used -- off piste) and that don't feel as though one is pedaling them underwater.

    I second these, particularly more float for more deep, unconsolidated snow. Getting the rear derailleur out of the way would be swell too, and might help with those fatter, knobby tires too, but less critical as 1x works well and I dont care about wide q factor.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I'd forgotten about one thing: On both of my fatbikes (one for snow, one for the rest of the year) I always have to choose between a dropper post or a suspension post. And whichever one I choose I always miss the other.

    No more: https://www.pnwcomponents.com/collec...28488424587341

    How long have you been running that? Best of both worlds?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemusher View Post
    How long have you been running that? Best of both worlds?

    Haven't even seen one yet -- it was just released today.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I'd forgotten about one thing: On both of my fatbikes (one for snow, one for the rest of the year) I always have to choose between a dropper post or a suspension post. And whichever one I choose I always miss the other.

    No more: https://www.pnwcomponents.com/collec...28488424587341
    Talk about a game changer.
    MJ
    14 Farley,Bluto,i9-27.5FatBNimbles
    16 Farley5,CarbonFork,27.5x4.5Barbegazi
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  25. #25
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    Lets hope that PNW post proves out!

    Improved changes for fat bikes?

    At 72 the market for bikes in general is not keeping up with my age; too long mostly.

    If I was going custom, short CS, upright position, and not too slack for a full rigid, (maybe Lauf).

    Hi BB, maybe no drop at all, (ocean shore riding)

    A true 29 X 4.0" tire to give good float and a reasonable Q.

    It might be interesting to see a comparison of equal contact areas, differing in shape. I would think that the long and narrow one would show some advantage due to the approach and departure angles smoothing the ride that way. The advantage of short and fat seems to me, being more limited.
    "Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway" John Wayne

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by rth009 View Post
    I second these, particularly more float for more deep, unconsolidated snow. Getting the rear derailleur out of the way would be swell too, and might help with those fatter, knobby tires too, but less critical as 1x works well and I dont care about wide q factor.
    So, question for ya. First, some context. As I've gone very, very far down the gearbox rabbit hole (many thousands of dollars invested), it is clear to me that people are polarized for or against it -- which is fine.

    Initially I experimented with internally geared cranks that just plug right in to a normal frame set design. In order: Hammerschmidt (two speeds), FSA Patterson (two speeds), Efneo (three speeds).

    The Hammerschmidt was well sealed -- perhaps too well, the sheer diameter of the outer bearings and sleeves was significant. It is hard to manufacture something perfectly round of that size and still have it be remotely affordable. The efficiency penalty and lack of range was not worth the price, however the unit was durable beyond any doubt. It was a beast.

    The Patterson was good, affordable, serviceable, but limited to 68mm BB shells.

    The Efneo... uhhh... deeply flawed execution details, that's putting it kindly.

    The bearing size is really what it comes down to. No way to make it small, so geared cranks are off the table.

    Price was a factor to me, I wanted to offer a good deal if I were to make my own. So, I started evaluating "chains in a box". Just like a regular car transmission, but with chains instead of meshing involute gears. Problem was, most people I talked to, they didn't like the idea of pulling the gearbox apart when the chains eventually wore out, even if the wear rate was 3x longer in an ultra clean sealed lubrication bath. They wanted much longer service intervals.

    Okay, then. Meshing gears it is, they last so friggin long it is ridiculous. But... those are expensive. I found myself making an "elite only" type of product. @#$* ...Well, okay, not everyone needs it, and for those who do, shell it out. Bummer, but it is what it is. That's what I'm near completion on.

    Still, the price thing nags at me. Could I do anything that relies on the ol cassette and derailleur that is just... more durable, or as you say, "out of the way"?

    What would you be willing to live with? If I put a cassette into a big, sealed case in a custom, wild looking chainstay, you'd be forced into having a non-standard rear wheel interface. Very heavy handed, as noted with the design constraints of the heavy handed Hammerschmidt.

    Alternatively, if I did something less heavy handed, like rearrange the location of the individual components of a conventional 1x derailleur along the length of the chain stay, I could make it semi-sealed and affordable. It would still be exposed to dirt intrusion in certain places, but the sensitive bits would be out of the way and you could grind the chainstay along an object as if you were riding a skateboard along that object. The main gripe here is that if you had a chainsuck moment, you'd have to fish out the chain in an extra awkward way, like removing a little guard plate. Perhaps I could make said guard easy (but not too easy) to remove.

    So, it comes down to what you'd be willing to live with in terms of function v cost v hassle. I can make something "out of the way" that would use a regular cassette sourced from anywhere. It is an idea I am going to evaluate after my mid-drive high end gearbox is completed.

    I'd love any input on this one. I do not see it as a patentable idea, it would require some unusual frame design at the chainstay area, which other manufacturers are not interested in, so I'm not gonna profit off it much. The good news is that I recently measured how much chain throw needs to be taken up on a 50-10 cassette, and it's not very much, perhaps something that could be accomplished in a straight line along the chainstay under a guard, if you get my meaning.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (officialy in 2016, functionally in 2020).

  27. #27
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    Damn you Mikesee!
    I just spent my grocery money on the PNW post.
    I'll be dumpster diving for dinner this week.

  28. #28
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    Great question!

    1) I would like to see a mid-travel (~140 - 150mm front and rear) Full Suspension Fatbike with semi-slack / slack geometry.

    2) Standard hub spacing (150/190) so that I can go 29 x 3.0 plus in summer for trail riding and 27.5 x 3.8/4 for the shoulder / mud season, and 26 x 4/5 for winter and/or sand riding.

    3) Standardized component and specs so I don't have to cobble it together myself or pay someone else to customize it. Nothing proprietary. Yes, you can read this as I am cheap.

    To me this makes the most sense for this market. We all agree we are not the masses, BUT, if we had a universal spec and standards that allowed us to use a fat bike as a reasonable "one bike quiver" for all seasons and all types of riding, I bet it would boost sales. At least I would be psyched

    Right now I am riding my Farley Ex8 as basically an All Mtn / Enduro trail bike in 29x3 and I am not sure how long it is going to hold up if I keep riding it like that. I routinely have both the front and rear suspension rings showing I bottom'ed out at least once (most likely multiple) time(s) during the ride. And yes, I have the shocks set up correctly for my weight and expected ride style. In order to avoid bottoming them out, I basically have to almost go to max pressure which just then increases the impact since it almost makes the bike feel like it's a rigid... conundrum!

    BUT I don't want to give up fat either. I really like riding it in fat mode as well.

    Give me everything damn it!

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  29. #29
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    Suspension dropper.....
    Almost every reverb out there goes squishy.....lol

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    So, question for ya. First, some context. As I've gone very, very far down the gearbox rabbit hole (many thousands of dollars invested), it is clear to me that people are polarized for or against it -- which is fine.

    Initially I experimented with internally geared cranks that just plug right in to a normal frame set design. In order: Hammerschmidt (two speeds), FSA Patterson (two speeds), Efneo (three speeds).

    The Hammerschmidt was well sealed -- perhaps too well, the sheer diameter of the outer bearings and sleeves was significant. It is hard to manufacture something perfectly round of that size and still have it be remotely affordable. The efficiency penalty and lack of range was not worth the price, however the unit was durable beyond any doubt. It was a beast.

    The Patterson was good, affordable, serviceable, but limited to 68mm BB shells.

    The Efneo... uhhh... deeply flawed execution details, that's putting it kindly.

    The bearing size is really what it comes down to. No way to make it small, so geared cranks are off the table.

    Price was a factor to me, I wanted to offer a good deal if I were to make my own. So, I started evaluating "chains in a box". Just like a regular car transmission, but with chains instead of meshing involute gears. Problem was, most people I talked to, they didn't like the idea of pulling the gearbox apart when the chains eventually wore out, even if the wear rate was 3x longer in an ultra clean sealed lubrication bath. They wanted much longer service intervals.

    Okay, then. Meshing gears it is, they last so friggin long it is ridiculous. But... those are expensive. I found myself making an "elite only" type of product. @#$* ...Well, okay, not everyone needs it, and for those who do, shell it out. Bummer, but it is what it is. That's what I'm near completion on.

    Still, the price thing nags at me. Could I do anything that relies on the ol cassette and derailleur that is just... more durable, or as you say, "out of the way"?

    What would you be willing to live with? If I put a cassette into a big, sealed case in a custom, wild looking chainstay, you'd be forced into having a non-standard rear wheel interface. Very heavy handed, as noted with the design constraints of the heavy handed Hammerschmidt.

    Alternatively, if I did something less heavy handed, like rearrange the location of the individual components of a conventional 1x derailleur along the length of the chain stay, I could make it semi-sealed and affordable. It would still be exposed to dirt intrusion in certain places, but the sensitive bits would be out of the way and you could grind the chainstay along an object as if you were riding a skateboard along that object. The main gripe here is that if you had a chainsuck moment, you'd have to fish out the chain in an extra awkward way, like removing a little guard plate. Perhaps I could make said guard easy (but not too easy) to remove.

    So, it comes down to what you'd be willing to live with in terms of function v cost v hassle. I can make something "out of the way" that would use a regular cassette sourced from anywhere. It is an idea I am going to evaluate after my mid-drive high end gearbox is completed.

    I'd love any input on this one. I do not see it as a patentable idea, it would require some unusual frame design at the chainstay area, which other manufacturers are not interested in, so I'm not gonna profit off it much. The good news is that I recently measured how much chain throw needs to be taken up on a 50-10 cassette, and it's not very much, perhaps something that could be accomplished in a straight line along the chainstay under a guard, if you get my meaning.
    I could see something like the honda DH bikes of old being the best idea for cold conditions. A sealed standard drivetrain outputing to propshaft then either belt or chain to rear cog. Fix the cog on the hub and have the freewheeling in the gearbox. Not sure how expensive that would be but it seems the best option for cold weather vs. meshing gears and lubricants. Though as you noted chain wear, etc.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    I could see something like the honda DH bikes of old being the best idea for cold conditions. A sealed standard drivetrain outputing to propshaft then either belt or chain to rear cog. Fix the cog on the hub and have the freewheeling in the gearbox. Not sure how expensive that would be but it seems the best option for cold weather vs. meshing gears and lubricants. Though as you noted chain wear, etc.
    I'm familiar, it wasn't a bad idea, just lack of range. The problem with increasing range to something useful (440% to 500%) is that you have a lot of chain throw in the fastest / tallest gear. That has to go somewhere, it won't fit in a box in the middle. One thought I had was to allow the throw to travel along the down tube area toward the head tube. The "box" would look like a smoking pipe, a large node with a thin neck poking out.

    This is doable, but would require a seriously odd frame design (which I'm okay with), and would interrupt some frame bag space (which I'm not super enthused about). Perhaps this is a worthwhile task regardless of the consequences.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    I'm familiar, it wasn't a bad idea, just lack of range. The problem with increasing range to something useful (440% to 500%) is that you have a lot of chain throw in the fastest / tallest gear. That has to go somewhere, it won't fit in a box in the middle. One thought I had was to allow the throw to travel along the down tube area toward the head tube. The "box" would look like a smoking pipe, a large node with a thin neck poking out.

    This is doable, but would require a seriously odd frame design (which I'm okay with), and would interrupt some frame bag space (which I'm not super enthused about). Perhaps this is a worthwhile task regardless of the consequences.
    Im hoping for a lighter IGH similar to a Rohloff Speedhub. That would open up options for tire width and decrease complexity/maintenance. It currently has a range of 526%, but is a boat anchor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skookum1 View Post
    Im hoping for a lighter IGH similar to a Rohloff Speedhub. That would open up options for tire width and decrease complexity/maintenance. It currently has a range of 526%, but is a boat anchor.
    The problem with lighter is about distribution. With a chain and sprocket system, you're dividing load among available teeth in contact. With meshing involute gears you're placing all load on one tooth per gear (an overturning pattern of levers), which is why meshing gears are thick and heavy so the teeth do not break right off.

    It sucks.

    One way to address this would be to make extremely high end gears. This is done in extreme performance helicopters and stuff. You make the body out of a composite material, and fashion the biting edges of the teeth out of metal. Pretty involved and expensive. Cutting the weight out of a Rohloff would be very, very hard. I'm not saying impossible, "just" hard.

    The trouble with chains is you have polygon chaos as thin surfaces wear out. Which also sucks.

    Perhaps you recall that prototype shown by CeramicSpeed (which, I must emphasize, they have not shown a video of it being ridden up a hill, no torque situations, or shifting). What is interesting about the concept is that it has very few contact points. It could be of some value, if it didn't have so many practical problems (deflection, dirt intrusion, rear hub interface).

    If I sound pessimistic, this crap is complicated to sort out. NSFW Ice skating uphill and all that.

    There are fancy workarounds to borrow from the high end motorsport world, but those involve computers and sensors. For their purposes, they are trying to reduce shock load and shift time at high RPM. For our purposes, I'm trying to reduce contact points as close to "one" as possible. This will eventually get explored because I have a software background and I can bridge the gap, but there will be implicit distrust from many riders who are experienced with capacitors and batteries going bad in extreme cold.

    Ice skating uphill.
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  34. #34
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    Many of us in the BC Rockies/Kootenays really want a modern geo fatty, 65 head, 76+ seat, designed around a 130+ fork that fits a 5"+ tire. We are riding the same stuff on our fattys that we ride our Chromag Rootdown BA's and Doctahawks on and find pretty much all the current fat bikes aren't up to it. Lots of guys are looking into customs or building their own.
    Simple request that no manufacturer is doing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    Are there yet any 120mm rims? My position against making rims (flooded market) has softened with time. I could be talked into making some.

    There are a handful of decent carbon options at 105mm.

    Then there's a 132mm monstrosity that weighs in the range of an average american child.

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    Quote Originally Posted by roughster View Post
    And yes, I have the shocks set up correctly for my weight and expected ride style. In order to avoid bottoming them out, I basically have to almost go to max pressure which just then increases the impact since it almost makes the bike feel like it's a rigid... conundrum!

    The latter statement implies that the former cannot be true.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinS View Post
    Many of us in the BC Rockies/Kootenays really want a modern geo fatty, 65 head, 76+ seat, designed around a 130+ fork that fits a 5"+ tire. We are riding the same stuff on our fattys that we ride our Chromag Rootdown BA's and Doctahawks on and find pretty much all the current fat bikes aren't up to it. Lots of guys are looking into customs or building their own.
    Simple request that no manufacturer is doing.

    If they saw a market (read: $$$$) in it, they'd be doing it.

  38. #38
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    Bike companies will develop what sells. My money for the short term is on e-bikes. Wheel and Sprocket, the largest shop in Wisconsin, is marketing the heck out of e-bikes.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    I'm familiar, it wasn't a bad idea, just lack of range. The problem with increasing range to something useful (440% to 500%) is that you have a lot of chain throw in the fastest / tallest gear. That has to go somewhere, it won't fit in a box in the middle. One thought I had was to allow the throw to travel along the down tube area toward the head tube. The "box" would look like a smoking pipe, a large node with a thin neck poking out.

    This is doable, but would require a seriously odd frame design (which I'm okay with), and would interrupt some frame bag space (which I'm not super enthused about). Perhaps this is a worthwhile task regardless of the consequences.

    Hmm guess i didn't think about that part. Works fine for the limitations imposed by DH but not quite the range for actual hills and such. I always though the nuvinci transmission would be a future that would be explored by bike companies with its infinite ratios and abilities to work with out lubrication (excluding the traction compound). Seems like a bike specific CVT would be a good option, similar to the nuvinci but without the difficulty of the size perhaps. Though I suspect the loss to friction would be considerable, probably just as bad as an IGH. Lubrication would probably preclude cold weather too.

    I grew up in the canadian prairies riding my bike all winter and distinctly remember BB's and headsets that were frozen solid until the grease cycled a bunch of times and chains that would take a few rotations to loosen and tires with flat spots.
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    weighs in the range of an average american child.
    Are we talking outdoor active, healthy diet, child, or video game obsessed, drool cup installed, cheeto's and koolaid, obese, child?
    Cannondale Lefty and HeadShock servicing, wheel building, etc...


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    "I grew up in the canadian prairies riding my bike all winter and distinctly remember BB's and headsets that were frozen solid until the grease cycled a bunch of times and chains that would take a few rotations to loosen and tires with flat spots."

    Aah! Square tires. Had a few rides on those.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    Hmm guess i didn't think about that part. Works fine for the limitations imposed by DH but not quite the range for actual hills and such. I always though the nuvinci transmission would be a future that would be explored by bike companies with its infinite ratios and abilities to work with out lubrication (excluding the traction compound). Seems like a bike specific CVT would be a good option, similar to the nuvinci but without the difficulty of the size perhaps. Though I suspect the loss to friction would be considerable, probably just as bad as an IGH. Lubrication would probably preclude cold weather too.

    I grew up in the canadian prairies riding my bike all winter and distinctly remember BB's and headsets that were frozen solid until the grease cycled a bunch of times and chains that would take a few rotations to loosen and tires with flat spots.
    The NuVinci was a heart breaker situation to my eyes. Such potential. It was good in the higher ranges, and it shifted *really* nice, often under high torque (just not peak torque up a hill). Unfortunately the low end had this swishy kind of feeling. It would survive being pushed past recommended torque but I think it would slip in very small amounts. I say this as a not-very-powerful-legs rider. When it comes to efficiency nothing compares with elements that directly push (gears) or pull (chain/sprocket). NuVinci (or its successor, I forget the name) is now seeing success in the E-bike specialty.

    I forgot to mention with the Honda style chains-cassette-box approach, there is a way to shorten the tension throw on the tallest gear, which is to use a third idler pulley to reduce the throw by half. Attempting that would not really save frame bag space (50T granny ring on a 1x cassette is rather large and whatnot), but it would save the reach toward the head tube a bit.
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  43. #43
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    Drew uses too many words and not enough cat pics.

    I'm hoping we see better ergonomics/q factors. Like if a Voytek and a tumbleweed prospector had a carbon baby.

    Also I'm tired of slacker HTAs. Most of my riding is in icy conditions and having too much weight off the front is dangerous.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Volsung View Post
    I'm hoping we see better ergonomics/q factors. Like if a Voytek and a tumbleweed prospector had a carbon baby.
    Man! That is SPECIFICALLY what I'm working on!! C'mon. You wound me, friend.

    Sad face.

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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    If they saw a market (read: $$$$) in it, they'd be doing it.
    I find the fat bike industry to be pretty slow to advance, look how long it took to ditch 1 1/8 headsets.
    The trails up here are progressing ahead of the industry, we have an immaculately groomed flow trail with gaps and big rollers and 1300' of descent. Nelson is starting to groom some pretty steep trails with rock drops, and Rossland has been doing some pretty sweet grooming.
    There is definitely $$ to be made away from the current clone bikes that are out there for the right small company.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volsung View Post
    Drew uses too many words and not enough cat pics.

    I'm hoping we see better ergonomics/q factors. Like if a Voytek and a tumbleweed prospector had a carbon baby.

    Also I'm tired of slacker HTAs. Most of my riding is in icy conditions and having too much weight off the front is dangerous.
    Slack head angles are fine when combined with a steeper seat tube angle that shifts your weight forward, the main problem is companies throwing a slack head angle on a bike and not compensating for the difference. A buddy of mine has one of those Doctahawks and it is a very weird machine, but the combination works. He has no issue climbing steep tech singletrack on a 63 HA with a 180-mm fork, and hauls on the DH's. No front wheel wash.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinS View Post
    I find the fat bike industry to be pretty slow to advance, look how long it took to ditch 1 1/8 headsets.
    The trails up here are progressing ahead of the industry, we have an immaculately groomed flow trail with gaps and big rollers and 1300' of descent. Nelson is starting to groom some pretty steep trails with rock drops, and Rossland has been doing some pretty sweet grooming.
    There is definitely $$ to be made away from the current clone bikes that are out there for the right small company.

    I don't necessarily disagree with you, but how many industries get things right, on time, every time?

    And when they don't, they get crucified from every angle. Think about this in terms of the new standards that every bike nerd likes to whine about these days. See?

  48. #48
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    Drew you clearly have a favorite cat. More Tortie pics.

    Edit- Martin weird seat tube angles mess with my old man knees. After 5 surgeries I cant mess around with that stuff.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Volsung View Post
    Drew you clearly have a favorite cat. More Tortie pics.

    Edit- Martin weird seat tube angles mess with my old man knees. After 5 surgeries I cant mess around with that stuff.
    ARE YOU SURE? She is evil incarnate, you don't want to know what goes on in that little brain of hers.

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  50. #50
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    Fat tall bikes and Fat bike trucks like the Crust Clydesdale or a fat Soma Tradesmen. Sidecars, AWD, Subaru and Volvo colabs, paniers that are also packrafts, more fabric spoke brands, integrated jetboils and pour over coffee cones. You know stuff like the pubes mobile.
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  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    Are we talking outdoor active, healthy diet, child, or video game obsessed, drool cup installed, cheeto's and koolaid, obese, child?
    it's been so long since i've seen one of the former that i assumed they were defunct. or outlawed.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinS View Post
    Many of us in the BC Rockies/Kootenays really want a modern geo fatty, 65 head, 76+ seat, designed around a 130+ fork that fits a 5"+ tire. We are riding the same stuff on our fattys that we ride our Chromag Rootdown BA's and Doctahawks on and find pretty much all the current fat bikes aren't up to it. Lots of guys are looking into customs or building their own.
    Simple request that no manufacturer is doing.
    +1, I'd buy one also! Probably the closest thing to that currently is the RSD Mayor V4, I picked on of those frames to build up for my steep/rough terrain geared bike.
    "I ride to clear my head, my head is clearer when I'm riding SS. Therefore, I choose to ride SS."~ Fullrange Drew

  53. #53
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    I'd love to see another tread pattern by Schwalbe. Though I do not anticipate the big players to make any new tires and fully expect that they will actually cut back in the short term.

    A Bud 26x3.8-4.0 would be interesting.

  54. #54
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    a lot of this is state of the bike industry type stuff.

    for fat bike specific stuff I would like to see Schwalbe get into the 27.5 fat game. I hear so many good things about the jumbo jim and want to try one but they don't make it in 27.5.

    I view fat bikes a lot like my road bike. I have a road bike from 2011 and it doesn't bother me in the least. my fatbike is from 2017 but is a rigid hartail setup so I don't see any huge leaps in tech on it really happening for awhile.

    I think hardtail fatbikes that are versatile will start to be the norm. Something you can run 26 fat, 29+, 27.5 fat, etc. which I think means manufacturers messing around with different dropout ideas and how to move them around. I love the idea that I can make my one bike change its personality with just a wheel change.

    This last one probably sounds silly but maybe 29 fat? I don't know how all the engineering works but I am always impressed with the ways they figure out how to work around certain problems. I am sure the tire would be a mile high but maybe if they chop out a bunch of the sidewall it might ride good.

  55. #55
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    I just want it to snow so I can ride it in the snow. I gives a damn about the state of the lizards.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  56. #56
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    Never involve yourself in the politics of chickens.

    Constantly searching for the "next big thing" makes us leave behind what was great while discovering what is good.

  57. #57
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    I would love it if Surly would make a 27.5 Edna. Also come back with an improved Rabbit Hole. They're still making Pugslies but no rim to make a Krampug.
    I like turtles

  58. #58
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    Id like to see a multi-wheel-Size frame like the Otso Voytek but sized for 29x3 and 27.5x4 to 4.5. (Real 27.5 like a VanHelga not the low profile stuff). It would be metal, preferably Aluminum, with threaded bb.

    It would have swingout dropout to allow adjustment and singlespeed use (not chips) and they would be designed to help lower the bb as wheel size grows. Love that the Voytek stayed with 177 rear axle, thats about as big as I want to see when running SS.

    Considering the old Surly 1x1 with 26x2.75 tires I used to use for snow riding, even todays fat bike landscape is like a dream sequence. Hope the industry does not cut back too much on the segment.

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    Would like to see more flex-style suspension options. Lauf is very interesting, but this is just one fork and why stop with simple fiberglass spring? The ski industry has almost six decades of different designs from fiberglass to all kinds of resins, high-tech fibers, and metal layers. It's possible to make such spring with a right rebound damping built into the spring itself.

  60. #60
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    talking of wheel size and multi surface adaptability .... I've had my Vertigo Cycles 'Snow Job' for a few years now and regularly swap it between 26x4/4.6 to 27.5x3/3.8 to 27.5x3/29x3 depending on expected conditions and it does an excellent job of being ace in every way. the front centre is relatively long, the rear centre pretty short (410 ish) and the low bb and slack front end with big offset rigid fork is sweet. it isn't zeitgeist/chromag type geo, but its definitely 'trail' orientated rather than old school numbers.

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    it has a 120mm press fit (170mm equivalent) bb with a 197 rear to keep the chainline sweet.

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    reckon Sean got it bang on with this one. wouldn't change anything...

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    For a rock steady Gas Tank bag > the DeWidget

    bit.ly/BuyDeWidget

    https://www.instagram.com/drj0n_bagworks/

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    The latter statement implies that the former cannot be true.
    Cool story! Im glad you know my weight, the bikes weight, and how I ride / where I ride! Hella skillful!
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  62. #62
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    I agree with the above posters on wanting a Schwalbe 27.5 Jumbo Jim. 4 & 5 would be cool. The last couple of years, when the snow is gone and the 4.0 JJs replace the Dillingers or Johnny 5s, I feel like Lance when he was still on drugs. I know folks love the 27.5 x3.8 Hodags, which Im currently running, but the ride quality just isnt in the same league.

    Id also like a full suspension fatty with a quality rear suspension design like DW link. Id empty my savings account for a Carbon Tuner King Khan with 5 front and rear travel, 27.5 x 4 tires, modern reach, and about a 66d head angle. (my incoming Fatillac hopefully fills this wish in alloy)

    People that have never ridden a full suspension fatty dont know how capable, comfortable and fast they can be. Itd be a shame if they disappear.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    No secret that fatbikes have faded back to a more realistic place within most bike shops. That surge a few years ago represented manufacturers wanting to get into the game to sell units, and didn't accurately reflect the number of consumers truly interested in the niche. ...
    I'm not sure that's entirely correct. To me it looked like: as the demand for Fat was being answered, a meaningful (significant? major?) portion of that demand was taken over by wider 29 and 27.5 where they did a better job at some riding where people had been using/going-to 26 Fat.
    Last edited by Canoe; 07-14-2019 at 02:58 AM.
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  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    ...
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    ...
    The real change I see coming, is the death of brick and mortar, and leading the charge will be the industry itself, seeking ever increasing profits, in a shrinking market. Consumer direct sales will kill all mid sized shops. Gigantic stores propped up by singular brands will continue to underwhelm with low paid staff and generally no one over the age of 23 working there (except the owner). Small/tiny shops will continue to exist to serve the function of installing parts and doing adjustments that need to be done. ...
    I hope your gloomy predictions of the future of the LBS are wrong. I don't think you're wrong, but I hope you're wrong.
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    ...
    E Bikes are the new darling. Give it 5 years, we'll be at Peak E, and wondering where to go from there.....
    I believe the points above will be closely related. Some factors that I believe will influence the above, over time:
    • significantly more bikes being used for commuting,
    • significantly more e-bikes being used for commuting,
    • e-bikes are attracting new riders and getting former riders back on bicycles, both for commuting and for recreation,
    • e-bikes are turning out to being a gateway-bike to a surprising number of e-bike riders subsequently moving to or getting an additional pure human-powered bicycle,
      - usually rather expensive and ridden by those who, upon various riding experiences or when fielding questions, will in a micro second display a grin from ear-to-ear,
    • limited market for e-MTB that are actually being used for mountain bike riding?,
    • manufacturers will respond to sell units,
    • someone needs to service those units.

    So where will the balance be?
    Will quality LBSs be needed for the demand of those wanting quality bikes (and service) or will the manufacturers and volume produced meet what portion of that need?
    Will LBSs make the switch to servicing e-bikes or will the model be specialty e-bike stores/service?
    Last edited by Canoe; 07-14-2019 at 02:56 AM.
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  65. #65
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    2019 fatbike state of the union.-0d8c858d-d909-4e67-b3a2-a1c7b55dd2bb.jpeg

    Fat e-bikes are pretty fun too
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    I <3 dRjOn's pics when they get posted!

    Nice bike

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    Perhaps less carbon. More and more in other circles they're claiming it can't be recycled.
    Anyone run into that with their carbon bike that's reached its end-of-life?

    Surely there's better ferrous or non-ferrous alloys that can come closer to carbon's strength-to-weight ratio?
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  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Perhaps less carbon. More and more in other circles they're claiming it can't be recycled.
    Anyone run into that with their carbon bike that's reached its end-of-life?

    Surely there's better ferrous or non-ferrous alloys that can come closer to carbon's strength-to-weight ratio?
    I accidentally hit the chainstay of my carbon bike, delaminating it, but the awesome part about carbon is it can be repaired much easier than aluminum for the most part, so I sanded it down, added some helical strips of carbon, some finishing layers, resin and hardener, then let it cure, re-sanded it down, added some clear-coat, and good to go again. Friend had her bike damaged in the earthquake when a machine fell on the bike, but got it was repaired by Calfee. In many ways, it's a much more durable product that can last longer than aluminum.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stopbreakindown View Post
    I <3 dRjOn's pics when they get posted!

    Nice bike
    thanks dude!
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  70. #70
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    slight drift...
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ... chainstay of my carbon bike, delaminating it,... resin and hardener,...
    I'm curious. Which resin?

    That may keeps it away from end-of-life longer, but there's still the issue of how to recycle at end-of-life.
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  71. #71
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    In comparison to the aerospace industry, cycling components are a drop in the bucket.

    I'd also venture a guess that a large part of the carbon components out there are being used and get resold due to the high cost of the product. No one wants to throw away a $400 stem because it's not short enough anymore. I believe that component failures are fairly uncommon in comparison to the sheer number of carbon product out there. Yes, I've seen the pictures of all of the Chinese frames out in the ocean.

    And when it comes to aluminum bike parts, it still comes down to the end user to get that product recycled. If you throw it in a landfill rather than recycling, are you coming out any better?

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinkers View Post
    ... And when it comes to aluminum bike parts, it still comes down to the end user to get that product recycled. If you throw it in a landfill rather than recycling, are you coming out any better?
    Around here, it's impossible to throw an Al or Fe frame into the landfill. Set out for garbage pickup, someone grabs it and sells the metal to a scrap yard.
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  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    slight drift...
    I'm curious. Which resin?

    That may keeps it away from end-of-life longer, but there's still the issue of how to recycle at end-of-life.
    West system 105 and 106 I believe.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by canyonrat View Post
    Id like to see a multi-wheel-Size frame like the Otso Voytek but sized for 29x3 and 27.5x4 to 4.5. (Real 27.5 like a VanHelga not the low profile stuff). It would be metal, preferably Aluminum, with threaded bb.

    It would have swingout dropout to allow adjustment and singlespeed use (not chips) and they would be designed to help lower the bb as wheel size grows. Love that the Voytek stayed with 177 rear axle, thats about as big as I want to see when running SS.

    Considering the old Surly 1x1 with 26x2.75 tires I used to use for snow riding, even todays fat bike landscape is like a dream sequence. Hope the industry does not cut back too much on the segment.

    Current Farley ticks most of your boxes.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Current Farley ticks most of your boxes.
    Except the low q factor....
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    slight drift...
    I'm curious. Which resin?

    That may keeps it away from end-of-life longer, but there's still the issue of how to recycle at end-of-life.
    I have 3 carbon bikes, born in 2006, 2013 and 2016. I don't see the need to recycle any of them in the near future. Of the things that get thrown out and not recycled, carbon bicycle frames are pretty insignificant. Then again, plastic straws that comprise .025% of plastics in the ocean seem to draw huge press while the other 99.975% is largely ignored.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    Some of my wish list are realistic. Many are not...
    - Sort-of-like-a-pogie glove. I call it "the claw". Thin insulation palm side of glove, absurd insulation / spaciousness toward the outside world. Have your heat, let go of bars in crash situation.
    ...
    Should be fairly straight-forward for DIY?
    • Start with a glove suitable to insulate hand from grips in winter.
      (and cork grips?)
    • Make an upper and lower clam-shell from a flexible waterproof fabric.
      (Consider if it needs to be breathable on the inner surface).
    • Fill each clam-shell with hollowfil or other insulation.
    • Cover the outer surface of the clam-shells with Reflectix (rubber/contact cement?), with the top shell's (on back of hand) Reflectix edge (and extended shell material?) folded and overhanging the lower shell's edge to block wind (snow, rain, rabid squirrels).
    • Attach the clam-shells to the glove with velcro? Other?
      - Allows for swapping different gloves (or mitts).
    • Draw string or velcro straps to seal the clam-shells to the "wrists" (forearms).
    • The "close" of the two clam-shells' Reflectix covers against wind can be held with a series of very small magnets, which will release easily. (velcro ~= too strong?)

    yes? no?
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  78. #78
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    Given avialable materials, limited market and the width of fat hubs, what's the chance of getting decent hubs that don't feel like you're making a mortgage payment.
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  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    I have 3 carbon bikes, born in 2006, 2013 and 2016. I don't see the need to recycle any of them in the near future. Of the things that get thrown out and not recycled, carbon bicycle frames are pretty insignificant. Then again, plastic straws that comprise .025% of plastics in the ocean seem to draw huge press while the other 99.975% is largely ignored.
    Your probably correct on the mass ratios. But straws kill animals much easier and are easy to avoid.

    While we shouldn't avoid thinking about end of life impact of bike, bikes are nothing compared to cars, boats, or the land use of golfing.

    On topic: I hope close to 5" tire is the end of the line and there shouldn't be a reason to move away from 197mm TA and 100mm BB. I don't see much gain in anything except very fringe cases to benefit from even wider tires.
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  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Given avialable materials, limited market and the width of fat hubs, what's the chance of getting decent hubs that don't feel like you're making a mortgage payment.

    I believe the DT Big Ride hubs have this covered. In spades.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Should be fairly straight-forward for DIY?
    • Start with a glove suitable to insulate hand from grips in winter.
      (and cork grips?)
    • Make an upper and lower clam-shell from a flexible waterproof fabric.
      (Consider if it needs to be breathable on the inner surface).
    • Fill each clam-shell with hollowfil or other insulation.
    • Cover the outer surface of the clam-shells with Reflectix (rubber/contact cement?), with the top shell's (on back of hand) Reflectix edge (and extended shell material?) folded and overhanging the lower shell's edge to block wind (snow, rain, rabid squirrels).
    • Attach the clam-shells to the glove with velcro? Other?
      - Allows for swapping different gloves (or mitts).
    • Draw string or velcro straps to seal the clam-shells to the "wrists" (forearms).
    • The "close" of the two clam-shells' Reflectix covers against wind can be held with a series of very small magnets, which will release easily. (velcro ~= too strong?)

    yes? no?
    Yes, you are likely on to something there. Conveniently, I know a guy who is making glove prototypes for a different purpose - winter time goose hunting - and there is a fair amount of feature overlap. So hopefully I won't have to add this one to my long list, someone else might get it done regardless.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (officialy in 2016, functionally in 2020).

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I believe the DT Big Ride hubs have this covered. In spades.
    That's what I thought when I read that, too. Not exactly cheap, but reasonable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Perhaps less carbon. More and more in other circles they're claiming it can't be recycled.
    Anyone run into that with their carbon bike that's reached its end-of-life?

    Surely there's better ferrous or non-ferrous alloys that can come closer to carbon's strength-to-weight ratio?
    Really not sure why recycling ever even entered this discussion. Recycling is a tremendous waste of energy. Things should be built to last, not made to throw away and "recycle."

  84. #84
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    I think now that the fatbike as a replacement for "my full sus, ss, hardtail dh'er, roadbike" desire has passed. We may be looking at them as an adventure or overlander style bike (see Pugsley V2.o). The true use of the fatbike may appeal to the niche market again.

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    - Fine-adjust dropper posts that work subzero F. Some sort of inverted collet, or multiple-tooth array like how Echo trials freewheels work, but in a linear fashion. Just please no more hydraulics.
    Bestill my foolish heart! Could this new USE post be a step in the right direction??
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    Tubeless Surly Bud in B fat size, with stud pockets.

  87. #87
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    29 x 3.8 , since it hasn't been done, someone will be crazy enough to be the first

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaquille_o'wheel View Post
    29 x 3.8 , since it hasn't been done, someone will be crazy enough to be the first

    I could see some benefits to that, in some places.

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    id like to try 29x3.8. - i could see it as a potential good option for off piste style riding...- i guess as snow is generally not really rideable that often in scotland, my fat bike has been priamrily used for iffy trail or boggy ground. generally, i have some overlap on the b fat and fat bike tyres for this, even 29x3, but 29x3.8 would be very interesting.

    ive also been 'reverse mullet'ting' my bikes for a few years now...that way i can keep the shortest back end (lots of reasons for me to like this) and still gain the roll over up front (stops the bike diving into holes with a wee bit of a hoppity if needed) - for hardtails or rigids.

    i basically have no idea on snow riding but definitely like the fatter wheels for 'barelytrack'
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  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaquille_o'wheel View Post
    29 x 3.8 , since it hasn't been done, someone will be crazy enough to be the first
    I'd be down for that!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by tmbrown View Post
    Tubeless Surly Bud in B fat size, with stud pockets.
    This also! I've asked Surly for 27.5 tires and so far they keep showing no interest.

    I'd also like to see a Bontrager XR4 27.5x3.8 tire.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hobine View Post
    I agree with the above posters on wanting a Schwalbe 27.5 Jumbo Jim. 4 & 5 would be cool. The last couple of years, when the snow is gone and the 4.0 JJs replace the Dillingers or Johnny 5s, I feel like Lance when he was still on drugs. I know folks love the 27.5 x3.8 Hodags, which Im currently running, but the ride quality just isnt in the same league.

    Id also like a full suspension fatty with a quality rear suspension design like DW link. Id empty my savings account for a Carbon Tuner King Khan with 5 front and rear travel, 27.5 x 4 tires, modern reach, and about a 66d head angle. (my incoming Fatillac hopefully fills this wish in alloy)

    People that have never ridden a full suspension fatty dont know how capable, comfortable and fast they can be. Itd be a shame if they disappear.
    That's why I'm hoping for a revised Bucksaw; otherwise if mine breaks I will replacing with a Mutz or Fatillac, or maybe a Dopamine

  92. #92
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    I think the majority of us use them on snow and on groomed trails. Tried to ride as summer bike once, but soon gave that up. Too rough of a ride. Mines been sitting in the garage collecting dust since April. Carbon frames and wheels, a good selection of ~5" tires and head tube angles between 68 and 70 degrees. Pretty much covers all we need right now in my opinion and I don't see much advancement. At least not any advancement that the general public will gobble up that will generate sales.

    That ship has sailed already within the last 2 years.

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcracer2 View Post
    That's why I'm hoping for a revised Bucksaw
    new salsa fatbikes being announced on July 24 . . .

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by rth009 View Post
    new salsa fatbikes being announced on July 24 . . .
    OOOOOOHHH....AHHHHHHH....

    Will it be betterer than all fat bikes before it?!! Longer, slacker, meaner, more stifferer!!!

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    I feel like we'll not see too much change to fatties now. Just like 29ers when fat and 650B came along, they've languished since the big brands don't feel like they are the prime target for leveraging the foisting off of the maximum number of units.

    What I want? the return of standards.

    One THREADED bottom bracket standard.

    One headset/headtube diameter standard (I'm fine with tapered or 44mm, but do we need both, and then variations within tapered?).

    One freehub body standard (impossible, but a guy can dream).

    The end of internal cable routing.

    Complete cessation of the circle jerk surrounding stiffness. Bikes are stiff enough, parts are stiff enough, stop trying to convince the Joe SixPack average rider that stiffer everything, every year, actually improves their lives.

    Rest of it is basically the same as any other segment in the industry.

    The real change I see coming, is the death of brick and mortar, and leading the charge will be the industry itself, seeking ever increasing profits, in a shrinking market. Consumer direct sales will kill all mid sized shops. Gigantic stores propped up by singular brands will continue to underwhelm with low paid staff and generally no one over the age of 23 working there (except the owner). Small/tiny shops will continue to exist to serve the function of installing parts and doing adjustments that need to be done.

    I was happy with bikes 10 years ago, the ensuing decade brought little to make me think more was needed. Plus bikes was about it, and the industries obsession with putting racer boy types on them, and lapping up their input like hungry cats at a milk bowl, has ruined them with ever shrinking tire volumes, so I have little hope for really interesting stuff moving forward.

    E Bikes are the new darling. Give it 5 years, we'll be at Peak E, and wondering where to go from there.....
    Can't argue with that list either!

    I would add the list a better choice of a decent fork for Fat bikes would be amazing but
    I can always dream............................................. ......................................

    I agree that the LBS is dying which is sad due to a lot of factors.
    I have always supported a good LBS and will do as long as I find one that I like.
    But for the record I do a lot of my own maintenance because it keeps my skills sharp and I know what to do when something goes wrong in the middle of no where.......

    As for E bikes.......there is good and bad.

    This coming from a guy that still rides 26 inch tires............but 27.5 plus is looking like a nice up grade.
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  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    Bestill my foolish heart! Could this new USE post be a step in the right direction??
    Better pics of the leadscrew and interference clutch here.

    I love it. Take my money. EDIT - and wave springs as well. Oh man. So many nerd buttons pushed at once.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    Better pics of the leadscrew and interference clutch here.

    I love it. Take my money. EDIT - and wave springs as well. Oh man. So many nerd buttons pushed at once.
    So when adjusting the height of the cheap Chinese knock-off, to get to the new height it will spin the seat like helicopter blades?
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

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    Am I a big giant freaking weenie for thinking something like a front and rear ISO Speed would be nice? Something to take the edge off, without the weight, cost, or maintenance of "real" suspension.

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    Quote Originally Posted by litespeedaddict View Post
    Am I a big giant freaking weenie for thinking something like a front and rear ISO Speed would be nice? Something to take the edge off, without the weight, cost, or maintenance of "real" suspension.
    Isn't that what fat tires do already?
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  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by sryanak View Post
    Isn't that what fat tires do already?
    Well I guess I can see why somebody might say that, and yes, to a point...but if larger tires were enough nobody would ever put on a front fork or buy a full boinger fattie. I'm not suggesting it would be for everyone, but I'd love to see it.

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    KS calls a post like that "out of warranty"

  102. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by litespeedaddict View Post
    Well I guess I can see why somebody might say that, and yes, to a point...but if larger tires were enough nobody would ever put on a front fork or buy a full boinger fattie. I'm not suggesting it would be for everyone, but I'd love to see it.
    I get forks or full suspension, that is adding something to the equation. ISO Speed seems like it wouldn't do anything the tires don't already do. I would love for someone else to try it and report back. It's not like I haven't been totally wrong many times in the past.
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    Having just dipped into the fat game a couple of years ago, my knowledge of where the trends have been, and come to is limited in experience. However after trying 26fat, Bfat, and 29+ they all have a place and they do it well. So much so that I even ride rail trail with 27.5x4.5 and enjoy not caring about gopher holes or sandy washouts. So I think the market is maturing, but with potential to continue to grow the more people try fat outside of snow or sand. What I see now is you have the racer market, trail, and touring/expedition/bikepacking. With smaller brands filling in the nuanced gaps making it possible to find a really great bike. The geometries are pretty dialed for the most part, or you can find something to your liking in a more boutique brand. With many bikes having adjustable dropouts, trying new setups is easy to get a feel for what works, and then one can start looking into the details of a bike that really suits what they want. If anything, fatbikes offer a much wider possiblility in setup in that regard than most of the mtb market.

    I would however like to see wider rims and 27.5 by 5" or wider for really soft conditions be available. So possible tire and rim/wheel tech will be where the most improvement will come from in that regard. Rollover really does make a difference, but pushing a lot of rotating mass does too. There is work to be done to make it possible, but it will be awesome when/if we see it.

    An evolution on f/s trailbike geo to a more modern take would be an interesting thing to see. It seems most f/s fatties are fairly conservative in that regard with a few exceptions. It is probably too niche to produce more than small scale, but I would like to see it. For what I ride and how I like my setups, something like a Fatillac would be all I need, but I do think there is a market for those wanting to push geometries.

    As I said earlier. The market is maturing, and so are all of us. I find myself riding fat more and more for things outside of snow. I know more than a few who bought fatbikes for snow, only to find the snow here can really suck, and skiing is better at those times, so they sold the bike. Now they are looking at fat again as they see people riding them on dirt and having a blast. The older I get, flying down a trail and potentially being out of work for 2 months keeps me grounded. I have learned that rock crawling and exploring are my preferred mode some days. Fat is a blast doing that kind of stuff. So I see the trail/dirt/exploring side pushing the fat market forward on one end, and getting more float for actually riding in more snow conditions growing the other end. Or at least I hope to see that.

  104. #104
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    My snow fat bike specific hope is anything to make riding softer deeper snow easier. Maybe that means wider, taller wheels, geometry changes longer wheel bases I can't say.
    And for bikes in general it sure appears that the rear derailleur is the next most vulnerable appendage that needs to be addressed.

  105. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by idahomer View Post
    My snow fat bike specific hope is anything to make riding softer deeper snow easier.
    That's what these are for...




  106. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
    That's what these are for...





    Some people will never get it. In this case, it's you.

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    Ya know, we used to have lots of fun before snow groomers came along.

    As someone that grooms local trail, I miss the old days.
    Jason
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    Whether you like and visit fat-bike.com or not, it's telling that they have to review gravel and "adventure" bikes, of sub 3.8" tire width, to produce content. Not to mention the other non-fat bike specific related accessories they've been reviewing the past year +.

  109. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Some people will never get it. In this case, it's you.
    I get it. Some of you don't have a myriad of groomed trails available nearby. You've stated that in past threads that you don't have them nearby so you need to make your own trails in the soft deep snow or travel for groomed trails.

    Or there others that like to adventure in the soft deep snow. I've tried it a few times, but it's a heart attack adventure at best and just wasn't my thing.

    The reality however is that the majority of fat bikes sold are used by those in the snow climates with groomed trails nearby with an even smaller number of people using them in the summer months. So the majority of the manufacturers aren't going to cater to the small number of people that like to make their own trails in the snow or like to to try and ride in softer deeper snow. It's a game of sales numbers. For the majority of fat bikers....4"-5" wide tires and current geometry works just fine.

  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    Whether you like and visit fat-bike.com or not, it's telling that they have to review gravel and "adventure" bikes, of sub 3.8" tire width, to produce content. Not to mention the other non-fat bike specific related accessories they've been reviewing the past year +.

    There are some good peeps there and they had a good run but that site is circling the drain.

  111. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAGI410 View Post
    Ya know, we used to have lots of fun before snow groomers came along.

    As someone that grooms local trail, I miss the old days.
    There is a trail right off my neighborhood that I use pretty frequently in the winter. Perhaps 3 years ago the trail was groomed which brought a small frown to my face. I happened upon an older couple that year who were interested to talk to me about my fatbike, 4" tires. They mentioned that the city council had groomed the trail for people who are riding fat bikes on the trail to which I replied, "Why do they need a groomed trail, they have fat bikes." The trail was not groomed this last season, riding was slower but more gratifying.... at least for me.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  112. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    There is a trail right off my neighborhood that I use pretty frequently in the winter. Perhaps 3 years ago the trail was groomed which brought a small frown to my face. I happened upon an older couple that year who were interested to talk to me about my fatbike, 4" tires. They mentioned that the city council had groomed the trail for people who are riding fat bikes on the trail to which I replied, "Why do they need a groomed trail, they have fat bikes." The trail was not groomed this last season, riding was slower but more gratifying.... at least for me.
    All depends on how much snowfall you get. Where I live you would be riding about 10 feet before coming to a stop in your tracks on an ungroomed trail. If you're a strong rider maybe 20 feet before you come to stop cuz your lungs/legs can't maintain. This assumes the dry powdery stuff of maybe 6-8". Wet heavy stuff of 4-6" like often seen in the midwest...forget about it. You're not moving anywhere unless it's groomed.

    My favorite snow to ride is crust snow...Stuff that's been subject to above freezing temperatures all day and then the temps drop below freezing at night. The next morning...you can virtually ride anywhere until it gets too warm again.

  113. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
    All depends on how much snowfall you get. Where I live you would be riding about 10 feet before coming to a stop in your tracks on an ungroomed trail. If you're a strong rider maybe 20 feet before you come to stop cuz your lungs/legs can't maintain. This assumes the dry powdery stuff of maybe 6-8". Wet heavy stuff of 4-6" like often seen in the midwest...forget about it. You're not moving anywhere unless it's groomed.

    My favorite snow to ride is crust snow...Stuff that's been subject to above freezing temperatures all day and then the temps drop below freezing at night. The next morning...you can virtually ride anywhere until it gets too warm again.
    Agreed. Where I live and ride....there would be far fewer opportunities to ride if there were no grooming, especially this last winter. Many trails would be unridable in a normal or above winter.

    Besides, it's not like all of these groomed trails get groomed by 5:00 am every morning after snowfall....there's plenty of times when the snow is plenty deep on the groomers.

  114. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    There are some good peeps there and they had a good run but that site is circling the drain.
    Its unfortunate.

  115. #115
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    I have been riding the Pugsley for 6 years now - all i have done is changed gearing here and there (From 3X9 to singlespeed - to 2X9 right now it is 11 to 42 in the back and 32 22 in front.

    I have ridden it on the sand in Mission beach San Diego - the sand in palm springs and death Valley - and the pumice in Mammoth and June Lake. It has seen snow in the Laguna Mountains and in June Lake.

    It spends a lot of time in Mission Trails park riding over lots of rocks and more rocks. I never come back from a ride wanting more out of a bike. It always is fun.

    (I am getting an Alfine 11 for it next week - so we will see how that works)

    If I were to change anything - well I cannot afford change - stability and reliability is what I love. I built the Nimble Beast in 2012 and hope to be riding it (or my son is almost tall enough to ride it) for as long as they make 26 X 4.0 tires (4.8 Bud in the front and 4.0 Framed tire in the back (which has a worn out sidewall and needs to be replaced)).

    I saw some White fat tires on sale.... hmmm...

    I just need to find the orange one-on floaters..
    My bike is heavier than yours - it does not have Carbon or Titanium parts - I love it!

  116. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    Whether you like and visit fat-bike.com or not, it's telling that they have to review gravel and "adventure" bikes, of sub 3.8" tire width, to produce content. Not to mention the other non-fat bike specific related accessories they've been reviewing the past year +.
    Is it burnout on the fat thing? Not to mention, there is more to cover than just reviews of new jewelry.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    There are some good peeps there and they had a good run but that site is circling the drain.
    As above, partly due to burnout. plusbike dot com has been idle since 2016 as well. Rather unfortunate that I see your adventure stories here and yet, so few on fat-bike these days. And those amazing pix to augment the story are amazing...

    On the groomed front...
    The utility of groomed trails for access to remote areas is quite nice. Using the extensive snowmobile trail system has been awesome!
    Part of the experience is the banter and such that takes place during a tire pressure stop, along with a little swig, swig pass mixed in with a little puff, puff pass while peeps are letting air out or pumping up. The less traveled, unmaintained sled tracks are where it's at. Some of em drop though a tight stand of trees with a steep descent that is twisted with lovely turns that were planted by unsuspecting snowmobilers! Epic, indeed!!!
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
    Doctor recommended...

  117. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemusher View Post
    How long have you been running that? Best of both worlds?

    I ordered one. Received and installed. And, ridden...

    ...a little.

    Sort of an on/off sensation. Not so much suspension as a bit of movement when you slam a pothole, ledge, or curb. Then back to rigid.

    Dropper part works fine.

  118. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I ordered one. Received and installed. And, ridden...

    ...a little.

    Sort of an on/off sensation. Not so much suspension as a bit of movement when you slam a pothole, ledge, or curb. Then back to rigid.

    Dropper part works fine.
    That's what I found, also.
    Very small tuning window.....about 5 psi....between too squishy and full rigid.
    And I'm running 287 psi...and I weigh around 170-175.
    Don't know what cold will do to both suspension action and dropper yet.

  119. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor View Post
    That's what I found, also.
    Very small tuning window.....about 5 psi....between too squishy and full rigid.
    And I'm running 287 psi...and I weigh around 170-175.
    Don't know what cold will do to both suspension action and dropper yet.

    Lucky. I couldn't find a sweet spot between full rigid and sagged ~85% of the way into the travel.

    Seems like a job for a coil conversion.

    In the meantime I sent mine back.

  120. #120
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    I have never owned or ridden a fat bike. I think they look cool and are probably fun but they don't seem practical to me. It reminds me of a Yamaha TW200 (I like motors too); Somewhat of an oddity but with a cult following. Sure, they will float better in sand. But the big tires don't seem to give you enough benefit to justify the weight. Then again, I struggle getting up hills on my standard bike.

    My guess is that fat bikes will find a niche in the e bike world. The weight is less of an issue and you get the extra punch from the motor. An e fat bike could be built fairly inexpensively without suspension costs and the tires will soak up a lot of the hits.

    The duals sport comparison: Yamaha TW200 vs. Suzuki DR-Z400S | Epic Field Notes

  121. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dung Hopper View Post
    I have never owned or ridden a fat bike. I think they look cool and are probably fun but they don't seem practical to me. It reminds me of a Yamaha TW200 (I like motors too); Somewhat of an oddity but with a cult following. Sure, they will float better in sand. But the big tires don't seem to give you enough benefit to justify the weight. Then again, I struggle getting up hills on my standard bike.

    My guess is that fat bikes will find a niche in the e bike world. The weight is less of an issue and you get the extra punch from the motor. An e fat bike could be built fairly inexpensively without suspension costs and the tires will soak up a lot of the hits.

    The duals sport comparison: Yamaha TW200 vs. Suzuki DR-Z400S | Epic Field Notes
    You should probably at least ride one. You might be surprised that they aren't that heavy, and with quick-rolling tires, little penalty for the float.

    Better in sand, sure... but able to ride in snow vs not ride at all is the game changer for me.
    2017 Santa Cruz Tallboy C 29er
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  122. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by litespeedaddict View Post
    Am I a big giant freaking weenie for thinking something like a front and rear ISO Speed would be nice? Something to take the edge off, without the weight, cost, or maintenance of "real" suspension.
    You are a grade A certified dork. Clear enough?

  123. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by tankhead10 View Post
    You are a grade A certified dork. Clear enough?
    I'll be the first to agree with you, I am a dork. #guiltyashell

  124. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by tankhead10 View Post
    You are a grade A certified dork. Clear enough?

    It's an enthusiast site: We're *all* dorks to some extent.

    Dorking out was the point of the thread.

    How is your comment advancing the discussion, exactly?

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    It was a joke. I was looking back at a thread from many years ago and I cut and pasted a direct quote from the op thinking he might remember the quote that he said to me for something.. carry on.. Just a joke.

    BTW I have been thinking of contacting you about a 29 plus wheel set for my bike. I visit your site often.

  126. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by tankhead10 View Post
    It was a joke. I was looking back at a thread from many years ago and I cut and pasted a direct quote from the op thinking he might remember the quote that he said to me for something.. carry on.. Just a joke.

    My bad -- missed the context.

  127. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by tankhead10 View Post
    It was a joke. I was looking back at a thread from many years ago and I cut and pasted a direct quote from the op thinking he might remember the quote that he said to me for something.. carry on.. Just a joke.

    BTW I have been thinking of contacting you about a 29 plus wheel set for my bike. I visit your site often.

    How would anyone know that? It reads bad, and if it really was a joke you're the only one who knew it so it falls flat on the funny scale.

  128. #128
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    Either a smiley or a longer quote would have helped everyone "get it". Oh well.
    I've told plenty of unfunny jokes over the years.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  129. #129
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    Electric bicycling is the only way to go in todays world. Whether you want to pay high prices at the local bicycle store, or buy a kit to put on your bicycle, its fun either way. Blasting up hills with little to no effort is fun!



    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    E-assist?
    Discuss.

  130. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dung Hopper View Post
    I have never owned or ridden a fat bike. I think they look cool and are probably fun but they don't seem practical to me. It reminds me of a Yamaha TW200 (I like motors too); Somewhat of an oddity but with a cult following. Sure, they will float better in sand. But the big tires don't seem to give you enough benefit to justify the weight. Then again, I struggle getting up hills on my standard bike.

    My guess is that fat bikes will find a niche in the e bike world. The weight is less of an issue and you get the extra punch from the motor. An e fat bike could be built fairly inexpensively without suspension costs and the tires will soak up a lot of the hits.

    The duals sport comparison: Yamaha TW200 vs. Suzuki DR-Z400S | Epic Field Notes
    Lemme see... Worried about weight?? Pfft! Fatbikes can be heavy, yus, but that can be a poor choice of bike/component package chosen. My fatbike weighs in at 28#'s and I cannot complain in the least since it performs very well. Is it for everyone? No. Are they a blast? Yus! Are they Jeeps on two wheels that can take you places that a, xx by 2.3 tire cannot? Yus! Your guess is a few years late... They have and are a niche that is not going away any time soon.

    I will keep riding my fatbike and plus bikes and enjoy every moment with each one.

    Now, get your ass on a fatbike in a fatbike environment and opine properly...
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
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  131. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt4x4 View Post
    Electric bicycling is the only way to go in todays world.
    yikes.

  132. #132
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    I think fat bikes have settled into their natural market. Theyll retain a niche use in places like the upper Great Lakes area where we get good amounts of snow and have decent mileage of groomed trails. In my experience, fat bikes are hilariously fun on a groomed snow trail and pretty sucky for anything else.

    I like the idea of light, hi volume tires. Studs are also pretty essential around WI. To me, the biggest engineering challenge is I want >4.5 tires AND I want normalish q-factor.

    Id guess things will continue to migrate toward 27.5.

    Id like to see some specialization go into low friction derailleurs, shifters, freehubs, and chains for cold weather use. Normal greases get really sticky at 15F. Current work-around solution is to degrease everything and re-lube with thin oil.

    I hope to not live long enough to see E-bikes become mainstream. Theyre just depressing.
    whatever...

  133. #133
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    What I like about my fat bike IS the q angle. No knee pain like I used to have for years with more narrow bb's. I also love that I can ride through all types of terrain and not have to avoid sandy areas to explore during rides. We don't get much snow where I live so I never bought this bike to be used as a snow bike. It is my only bike that I own now. Titanium frame and moderate expense kit. It's all good for me.

  134. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by steadite View Post
    In my experience, fat bikes are hilariously fun on a groomed snow trail and pretty sucky for anything else.
    I found my fat bike way more fun than expected in summer use. I don't use it on every ride, but it is nice to switch it up once every week or two. I've also found it incredibly fun on some sandy trails/roads and in dry washes and other places I would never bother taking my trail bike.

    Oddly, I also find I'm drawn to a different sense of adventure on my fat bike, as in, I am more content to just ride it on a regular 4x4 road just for the experience and scenery...than I would on my trail bike.

    I hope to not live long enough to see E-bikes become mainstream. Theyre just depressing.
    There's medication that will help you with your problem.

  135. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dung Hopper View Post
    I have never owned or ridden a fat bike... the big tires don't seem to give you enough benefit to justify the weight.
    You have some unfounded assumptions. Sure, you can buy a fat bike that is a boat anchor or you can buy/build one to be light. One of my fat bikes is the lightest bike in my quiver, and I don't really own any heavy bikes.

    Quote Originally Posted by steadite View Post
    ...In my experience, fat bikes are hilariously fun on a groomed snow trail and pretty sucky for anything else...
    I think you need more experience...

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