10 speed shifter with 1x9 drivetrain- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    10 speed shifter with 1x9 drivetrain

    Hi folks!

    I was wondering if this setup could work.

    SRAM 10 speeds TT shifter on Paul Thumbies on the front
    SRAM XO 9 speeds rear derailleur
    SRAM PG990 casette?

    Normally, I do not think the front shifter could move futher once the rear derailleur will have reached the last cog of the cassette.

    Correct me if I am wrong. Thanks!!!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by igonzo128 View Post
    Hi folks!

    I was wondering if this setup could work.

    SRAM 10 speeds TT shifter on Paul Thumbies on the front
    SRAM XO 9 speeds rear derailleur
    SRAM PG990 casette?

    Normally, I do not think the front shifter could move futher once the rear derailleur will have reached the last cog of the cassette.

    Correct me if I am wrong. Thanks!!!
    10-sp shifters do not work with 9-sp RDs/cassettes

    If you want to use a front friction shifter attached to the RD, it likely will not have enough cable pull to reach the whole cassette.
    Last edited by shiggy; 12-04-2011 at 10:42 AM.
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  3. #3
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    But Sram TT shifter series use indexed rear / friction front shifting ?

    I plan using the shifter that control the rear only.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by igonzo128 View Post
    But Sram TT shifter series use indexed rear / friction front shifting ?

    I plan using the shifter that control the rear only.
    Re-read my first reply.

    Bottom line: Will Not Work
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  5. #5
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    In friction mode, it should work. 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes all fit on the same hubs, and have the same throw from the high to low cogs (within a few millimeters anyway). Unlike 7 speed cassettes, for example, which are noticeably narrower. As long as the shifter can swing the rear derailleur the width of the cassette (which it can), you should be able to shift an 8, 9, or 10 speed drivetrain (using the right rear derailleur, chain, and cassette combo) with any 8, 9, or 10 speed friction shifter. Unless I am missing something. Anyone else?

    I just ready Shiggys two posts. So what up Shig? Do 10 speed shifters actually have less throw/cable pull than 9 speed? Is the difference in the width between the 9 and 10 speed cassettes that significant? Dont 10 speed shifters in friction mode give you the tiny little extra you need?

    I am thinking back to the day of 7 speed shimano thumbies. Turns out they had extra throw to them and you could use them for 8 speed, no problem, and that was a whole extra cog worth of spacing. 7-> 8 speed was the last time increase in gearing where the spacing stayed the same and the cassette got wider. Every increase then has kept the cassette the same width and changed (decreased) the cog spacing.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtDad View Post
    In friction mode, it should work. 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes all fit on the same hubs, and have the same throw from the high to low cogs (within a few millimeters anyway). Unlike 7 speed cassettes, for example, which are noticeably narrower. As long as the shifter can swing the rear derailleur the width of the cassette (which it can), you should be able to shift an 8, 9, or 10 speed drivetrain (using the right rear derailleur, chain, and cassette combo) with any 8, 9, or 10 speed friction shifter. Unless I am missing something. Anyone else?

    I just ready Shiggys two posts. So what up Shig? Do 10 speed shifters actually have less throw/cable pull than 9 speed? Is the difference between the 9 and 10 speed cassettes that significant?
    There is no friction mode for the rear SRAM barend AFAIK

    The front shifter is friction, but its cable pull is basically the same as for a Shimano front derailleur.

    SRAM rear derailleurs (9- and 10-sp) require more cable pull than Shimano derailleurs, and more than a front shifter can provide.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    There is no friction mode for the rear SRAM barend AFAIK
    «To maintain quality shifts across a variety of chainring sizes, front shifting is operated on a friction mode; while the rear shifter is indexed to maintain precise and rapid shifts. »

  8. #8
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    Anyway Road Exact Actuation and MTB 1:1 technonoly use the same cable pull ratio. So
    i think my Sram TT shifter will be compatible with the curent 10 speeds mtb stuff.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by igonzo128 View Post
    «To maintain quality shifts across a variety of chainring sizes, front shifting is operated on a friction mode; while the rear shifter is indexed to maintain precise and rapid shifts. »
    So what part of 10-speed indexed shifters will not work with 9-speed rear derailleurs and 9-speed cassettes do you not understand?
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by igonzo128 View Post
    Anyway Road Exact Actuation and MTB 1:1 technonoly use the same cable pull ratio. So
    i think my Sram TT shifter will be compatible with the curent 10 speeds mtb stuff.
    Only for TEN-SPEED!
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    So what part of 10-speed indexed shifters will not work with 9-speed rear derailleurs and 9-speed cassettes do you not understand?
    Re-read my reply.

    I was talking about your statement that the TT shifter was not using indexed rear shifting.

    Mods are not what they used to be...

    Thanks anyway

  12. #12
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    It is compatible with MTB 10 speed- I run Thumbies/TT500's with X9 rear and a 12-32 cassette on my 29er, which is moving over to my Pugs this week. I just wish SRAM would make a front deraillier so I wouldn't have to use the Shimano one.

  13. #13
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    igonzo- just inspecting my shifter set up, and the front friction shifter appears to have a little more throw (# of degrees) than the rear indexed one, so you could use that as your rear shifter. It would be a little odd to set up, but it will work in a pinch, plus you can increase the friction on it by tightening the allen bolt on top.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by igonzo128 View Post
    Re-read my reply.

    I was talking about your statement that the TT shifter was not using indexed rear shifting.

    Mods are not what they used to be...

    Thanks anyway
    The way I read this thread is he said there was no friction mode in the rear to which you replied, "To maintain quality shifts across a variety of chainring sizes, front shifting is operated on a friction mode; while the rear shifter is indexed to maintain precise and rapid shifts." So I get his frustration a bit.

    Shiggy has been consistant in his message. I think what he has been trying to say is while both 9 and 10 speed shifters pull 1 : 1 on the cable, the spacing is different between 9 and 10 speed cassettes. The 10 speed cogs are closer together so the 10 speed shifter will not pull the derailler as far as a 9 speed shifter for each shift. You could probably make it work for a couple of gears but it would go wrong as you got to either end of the cassette.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by igonzo128 View Post
    Re-read my reply.

    I was talking about your statement that the TT shifter was not using indexed rear shifting.

    Mods are not what they used to be...

    Thanks anyway
    I never said the rear shifter was not indexed. It is, but ONLY for SRAM 10-speed RDs and 10-speed cassettes

    But sure, try it. Seems that is the only way you will understand.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by deuxdiesel View Post
    igonzo- just inspecting my shifter set up, and the front friction shifter appears to have a little more throw (# of degrees) than the rear indexed one, so you could use that as your rear shifter. It would be a little odd to set up, but it will work in a pinch, plus you can increase the friction on it by tightening the allen bolt on top.
    The problem with using the front shifter is not the degrees of travel, but the amount of cable pull. SRAM's front shifters/front derailleurs use basically the same cable pull as Shimano, unlike the RD/rear shifters. For Shimano the F&R shifters have about the same cable pull. SRAM front shifters have less total pull than the rear shifters
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by igonzo128 View Post
    Re-read my reply.

    I was talking about your statement that the TT shifter was not using indexed rear shifting.

    Mods are not what they used to be...

    Thanks anyway
    No but morons are still morons on here. You sir however, are a complete moron. And complete morons are extremely rare.

    Shiggy is too polite to do what I now have to do.

    So...for the obviously learning impaired, let's break down the issues.

    SRAM 10 speed road and 10 speed mountain derailleurs and shifters use the same EXACT ratios. Thus they can all be mixed and matched however the customer wishes, as long as its labeled as a 10 speed SRAM drivetrain component, it will work with any other 10 speed SRAM component.

    SRAM's 9 speed drivetrain equipment, which was always exclusive to the mtb side of the company (the road stuff debuted as ten speed, and was never offered in 9 speed models) was all their 1:1 ratio that they used to set themselves apart from shimano's more traditional 2:1 ratio geometry. As such, if you attempt the mix a 10 speed SRAM rear shifter, regardless of whether its one of the TT bar end shifters or one of the mtb shifters with a 9sp X.O rear derailleur, it will <b><bl>NOT</b></bl> work correctly.

    All the shimano 10 speed ROAD drivetrain components use the 2:1 ratio, so they ARE compatible with the shimano 9 speed (or less) mtb drivetrain components. The 10 speed shimano DynaSys mtb drivetrain components however are not cross-compatible to any of the other shimano drivetrains (not 9sp mtb, not 10 speed road, etc). Shimano has never revealed what the exact ratio their 10 speed mtb parts use but industry rumours I've read put it as something around 1.3 : 1.

    And as to cassettes, 9speed cassettes for shimano and sram use the same cog-center to cog-center spacing, and same goes for their respective 10 speed models. But the 9sp spacing is NOT the same as 10 speed spacing. So you cannot simply use a 9sp cassette on a 10 speed bike (or vice versa). If you do, the only cogs you'll shift perfectly into are the 1st and last (9th or 10th) position cogs, since they're at the exact same points on the freehub bodies (as the overall space the cassettes fit into is the same from everything from 8 speeds on up).
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