Transition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 63 of 63
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    270

    Transition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig

    First Look: 4 New Bikes From Transition - Eurobike 2014 - Pinkbike

    Ripcord

    Transition has built up a strong band of followers over the years, and many of those riders are also parents. Well, now there's a Transition for the groms, a full-suspension bike that uses 24 wheels and a 100mm 26 fork to create a miniature all-mountain rig. With a low standover and handlebar height, the Ripcord could be a good option for those hard chargers who aren't quite tall enough for a small 26 bike, but are deserving of a bike that won't hold them back. The final price isn't set in stone, but expect it to be somewhere around the $1500 USD mark.

  2. #2
    501
    501 is offline
    Old fast guy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    98
    the Little guys bike looks awesome as do the others! looks like one of my little ones will be on the Ripcord!!

    do you have an eta on the Ripcord?
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ love all things called bikes

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    305
    1500 is not a bad price, either.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,320
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Mac View Post
    1500 is not a bad price, either.
    Looks like the price is going up (now $1699.00) and spec is changing on the website. Transition needs to think twice about the 165mm cranks while they are at it. Anyone know about Jalco rims? Hopefully they are light!

  5. #5
    dlc
    dlc is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    238
    Really want to see the overall weight. Under 25 seems hard with this bike.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    348
    bump - anyone bought or seen one of these in the flesh?

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: string's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,549
    Have not seen but I happened to email dropnzone about availability & was told March (hopefully)

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: string's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,549
    bump - drop n'zone has the ripcords in stock. I will have one in a few days to play with. (will maybe not me..but my son)

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    270
    lucky kid... I purchased a bike from drop-n-zone last year, great customer services.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    153
    The Transition site says it uses a 26" fork "for easy upgrades, but no details. Anyone have the scoop as to whether or not the rear needs to be swapped out to throw 26" tires on there?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by string View Post
    bump - drop n'zone has the ripcords in stock. I will have one in a few days to play with. (will maybe not me..but my son)
    Give us a review when you get hooked up?

    Found this from last year.

    Grom Patrol | Coming Down the Pipe for Grom Bikers in 2015

    Really like the Ripcord, but I'm waiting to hear from Transition as to the ability to upgrade to 26" tire/wheels.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    270
    the easy upgrade is for fork option/replacement... not to upgrade the bike to 26".

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by dc40 View Post
    the easy upgrade is for fork option/replacement... not to upgrade the bike to 26".
    Gotcha...the way they worded it:

    "We have based the design around a 100mm travel 26" fork and a standard size rear shock so you have plenty of upgrade options down the road."

    ...led me to believe it did. Probably wishful thinking on my part.

    Oh well...there are a couple of other options that will.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    348
    i think the fact that the ripcord is 24" specific is what makes it special. "upgradeable" to 26" wheels means longer chainstays than necessary, and a compromise in bb height with either 24" or 26" wheels. by the numbers, the bike is no-compromise shredder

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,320
    Quote Originally Posted by boomforeal View Post
    i think the fact that the ripcord is 24" specific is what makes it special. "upgradeable" to 26" wheels means longer chainstays than necessary, and a compromise in bb height with either 24" or 26" wheels. by the numbers, the bike is no-compromise shredder
    I agree, going the 24" and 26" down the road there are compromises both ways. Via 24", the chainstay length at 420mm is REALLY long. I mean come on, there are now 27.5" bikes approaching that length now. With 26" the BB will likely be really high.

    It looks like Transition has it pretty close to ideal with the short stays and low standover. The build though at $1700 is a hefty 29.5 pounds as reported by a few already. Waiting for a frame only option, they need to offer this so parents can build them lighter. No way would my 55 pounder be able to really enjoy a bike this heavy without putting it on a serious diet. I mean its more than half his body weight!

    Looking forward to seeing some of the builds parents will do with these bikes to make them lighter.

    The new Norco 4.3 also looks like a great option - https://www.norco.com/bikes/mountain...luid/fluid-43/ they also make a 26" fully as well.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: string's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,549
    Got the Ripcord in yesterday. The stock build looked better than I thought and came in around 29.5 lbs. I was already planning on upgrading from parts I had ready to go (was looking at another frame only option but needed something sooner for my sons birthday). I have not tried to put a 26 wheel in but will give it test, however I am 99.9% sure there is no way it will fit. The stays are short. The standover should be excellent as the frame looks tiny on my work stand. There were a few smaller details not in the specs that transition did a good job on. (like 10mm axles)

    I really wanted the frame only and am swapping out most of the parts. Had I not been stock piling parts I would most likely have gone with the stock build other than a few items.

    With that said, I have replaced the fork with a Fox float 100mm CTD FIt (brand new 2013...gotta love 26" deals). Also replacing the drive-train with a zee clutch derailuer, xt shifter with opitcal display (my son still likes to look at the gear he is in), ditching the chain guide and going with canefield 155mm cranks and a wide narrow ring. Also replacing the wheels and tires with a set I had already built before I ordered the transition (Hope Pro 2 hubs laced to alienation deviant rims). Lastly replacing the stock shimano brakes with some Hope M4's I already had sitting around (I think hope has one of the best reach adjustments for smaller hands).

    The Kenda Kinetics are meatty tires. I have not weighed yet but they are pretty heavy from what I ready. I have a set of Maxxis Snypers mounted but am not thrilled with the lack of nobs and how skinny they are even mounted to 25mm rim. Its more of a xc race tread and I wish they had added a bit more side nobs and volume. I would like to find some Schwalbe fat alber 24's but they have been out of stock.

    I have to finish the build by Friday but have done everything other than the cranks (need an ISiS crankpuller...didn't know they still made that interface...) and bleed the hopes after shortening the hose. Will post some pics when done.

    Paint looks better in person. Can't wait to try it out (or at least watch it tried out)

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,016
    What's with the 'swapping to 26" wheels" In that grompatrol article?

    Why would you want to do that?
    Swapping wheels will NOT make the bike fit bigger, reach and stack stay the same, which are the dimensions that define bike fit.
    Putting bigger wheels will raise the bottom bracket, and stand over,never a good thing.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: string's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,549
    Quote Originally Posted by Tjaard View Post
    What's with the 'swapping to 26" wheels" In that grompatrol article?

    Why would you want to do that?
    Swapping wheels will NOT make the bike fit bigger, reach and stack stay the same, which are the dimensions that define bike fit.
    Putting bigger wheels will raise the bottom bracket, and stand over,never a good thing.
    I think the reason for wanting to convert to 26" at some point in the future is the ability is to stretch another year or two out of an expensive kids bike before its out grown. I bought ours strictly as a 24 but it would be cool to have the option to convert in the future. Knolly used to offer an upgrade program where you purchased a new rear to increase the size. Of course this was staying 26" not changing wheel size but I would have no problem paying to convert if Transition ever offered it. (they just need to make a 26" ripcord in xs that has some interchangeable parts)

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by Tjaard View Post
    What's with the 'swapping to 26" wheels" In that grompatrol article?

    Why would you want to do that?
    Swapping wheels will NOT make the bike fit bigger, reach and stack stay the same, which are the dimensions that define bike fit.
    Putting bigger wheels will raise the bottom bracket, and stand over,never a good thing.
    Not everyone has the time/income to support this habit beyond the trail, especially with three or more kids. It would be beneficial to some of us to sacrifice "optimal geometry" to be able to get more use out of a $2,000 investment. I'm looking for something with some flexibility to allow me to get my 10yo on a 24" that he'll likely outgrow by next year. If he could stretch it another year, I could then pass it down to his younger sister, and then his younger brother as the older kids move on to more "fitting" bikes. Options are extremely limited for this age group, and I don't have a lot of time to spend building bikes.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,016

    wheel size swap

    Quote Originally Posted by tomson75 View Post
    Not everyone has the income to support this habit ....
    Absolutely, if you can make a bike fit a growing child for a longer time, that's great.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomson75 View Post
    ...to sacrifice "optimal geometry" to be able to get more use out of a $2,000 investment.
    The point that people seem to be missing here is that changing wheels does not change geometry(at least not crucial fit related geometry). It has nothing to do with sacrificing optimum fit or handling. It simply doesn't help.

    Obviously stack and reach don't change if you swap wheels.
    If you are unfamiliar with the stack and reach system give google a shout.

    If you want to feel it to believe it try this:
    Put your kid's bike in a trainer. Try riding it. It's too small right?
    Now, put some boards or blocks under the trainer and front wheel and try riding it now. Does it fit any better? Of course it doesn't, everything you touch is still the same.
    Yet, raising the bike of the floor is the exact same geometry change you would get by switching to a larger wheel.

    Perhaps the reason this misconception is so persistent is an error of causality:
    We see bikes with small wheels which fit small kids and we see bikes with big wheels which fit big people, so we think: "big wheels must make a bike fit bigger people"
    The mistake of course is that it's not the big wheels that make the bike fit bigger people.

    If you want maximum 'growth range' out of a bike, start with a bike with a very low bottom bracket and very short cranks. Then select the bike with the biggest stack and reach that still has sufficient standover.
    Then, throw on a narrow handle bar, super short and slammed stem.
    After the child grows, you raise the saddle, using a longer seatpost if necessary, use a longer stem with all the spacers underneath, and perhaps a wider bar.

    These changes will actually make the bike FIT better, unlike a wheel change. As a side benefit they are about 15% of the cost of a set of wheels and tires.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by Tjaard View Post
    Absolutely, if you can make a bike fit a growing child for a longer time, that's great.

    The point that people seem to be missing here is that changing wheels does not change geometry(at least not crucial fit related geometry). It has nothing to do with sacrificing optimum fit or handling. It simply doesn't help.

    Obviously stack and reach don't change if you swap wheels.
    If you are unfamiliar with the stack and reach system give google a shout.

    If you want to feel it to believe it try this:
    Put your kid's bike in a trainer. Try riding it. It's too small right?
    Now, put some boards or blocks under the trainer and front wheel and try riding it now. Does it fit any better? Of course it doesn't, everything you touch is still the same.
    Yet, raising the bike of the floor is the exact same geometry change you would get by switching to a larger wheel.

    Perhaps the reason this misconception is so persistent is an error of causality:
    We see bikes with small wheels which fit small kids and we see bikes with big wheels which fit big people, so we think: "big wheels must make a bike fit bigger people"
    The mistake of course is that it's not the big wheels that make the bike fit bigger people.

    If you want maximum 'growth range' out of a bike, start with a bike with a very low bottom bracket and very short cranks. Then select the bike with the biggest stack and reach that still has sufficient standover.
    Then, throw on a narrow handle bar, super short and slammed stem.
    After the child grows, you raise the saddle, using a longer seatpost if necessary, use a longer stem with all the spacers underneath, and perhaps a wider bar.

    These changes will actually make the bike FITbetter, unlike a wheel change. As a side benefit they are about 15% of the cost of a set of wheels and tires.
    I didn't mean to suggest that changing wheel/tire size would alter the geometry. Perhaps I should have clarified that the rider would have to sacrifice optimal geometry either initially, or after the rider has outgrown the frame....depending on whether the bike purchased was a good fit to start, or purchased with a good fit in mind down the road.

    I understand the concepts here, but it doesn't change the underlying issue for me, and that's money. Being able to throw a set of 26's to help with rolling speed and clearance would, at least theoretically, buy some time...albeit without a great fit.

    That bolded part is very beneficial information, and I'll use this as I try and hone in on the right bike for my kids...but I'd still like to find something with just a little more versatility. Specialized is marketing a Grom bike that changes wheel sizes, but it's about $500 bucks out of my price range.

    It looks like I'll have to pay closer attention to BB and crank sizes as well...

    Cheers!

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,016

    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by tomson75 View Post
    I understand the concepts here, but it doesn't change the underlying issue for me, and that's money. Being able to throw a set of 26's to help with rolling speed and clearance would, at least theoretically, buy some time...albeit without a great fit.
    Cheers!
    Aha, I had not considered that.
    From the way I read your' and others' posts, it seemed to imply that people were thinking that swapping in bigger wheels would make the bike usable for a longer time for a growing child, which I took to mean fit a bigger kid.

    I shouldn't have made assumptions like that, we all know what assume stands for....

    I guess my view is that if money is the issue, spending a lot of money on a new wheelset and tires seems seems like a lot of money spent, simply for some better roll-over capability and perhaps some rolling resistance gains. Especially since those gains are offset by higher weight, worse center of gravity and less standover.
    All that, and it would be something only used for a short time.

    I like, and ride, 29ers, but in all honesty the difference from 26" was not night and day.
    So for me personally, if my kid was at the larger end of fitting on their 24", I wouldn't spend the money just to cram wheels 2" larger into it for one year or so.

    On a different note, Trek is offering a kids bike, the FuelEX Jr with 26 wheels, basically the 29er under the 24" wheeled bikes :-)

    So, if you value 26 much higher than 24", that might be just the ticket.


    Fuel EX Jr - Trek Bicycle

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,016

    kids bike geometry

    Here are a couple of kids (and one xs women's) bikes.

    Transition Juliana Trek Specialized Islabikes
    Ripcord Origin Fuel ex Jr Camber Grom Beinn 24

    stack 503 547 519 547 500
    reach 366 364 381 388 340

    standover 576 689 653 621 600
    chainstay 381 424 429 420 390

    BB height 309 312 316 291 245
    effectibe BB 284 287 294 264 245

    cranklength 165 ? ? 170 140

    travel 100 100 90 110 rigid
    wheelsize 24 27.5 26 24 24


    Notes:
    Standover is the most critical, too tall is too tall. Unfortunately it is a very unreliable number from bike websites, as it depends where you measure it. So, take that number with a big grain of salt.

    Stack and reach are the real numbers that determine fit. Of those reach is probable the most critical one, since bars a bit high is not the end of the world.

    The Syntace Dropforce stem can really help with that. It's quite short and super low:
    Syntace

    Pedal stance width is very important but no site lists it.
    Crank length is also a big issue, but not every site mentions it.
    Think about a child 2/3 of and adult's height, to get a similar feel, they should have a crank that's 2/3 as long, ie 117 mm long.
    Shorter cranks prevent rock strikes, allow for more normal pedaling motion, better technical riding out of the saddle and most importantly, allow for a low bottom bracket.

    Bottom bracket height:
    Lower bottom brackets make a bike more stable, easier to flick from left to right hand cornering and most importantly, allow kids to get their feet on the ground without setting their saddle to low.
    Effective bottom bracket height is bb height after sag, in other words while riding.

    Chainstay length:
    Shorter stays make pumping and manualing easier, crucial to young riders developing feel for the bike and skills.
    They also keep the riders center of gravity back, important on these tiny frames with very short front centers.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,016

    geo per bike

    Transition Ripcord:
    Great:
    -chainstay length. Very nice and short. If you are going to have tiny wheels, you might as well have tiny stays.
    Good:
    -standover, if these numbers are accurate, this is the best one.
    -stack, nice and low in case your rider needs that, you can always raise it.
    -shortest reach. Not better per se, but it's smallest bike on here that gets you full suspension and at least 24" wheels.
    -most trail (slackest head angle). Given their weight, none of these are xc race bikes, and due to their small wheels and short wheel base they don't have a ton of high speed stability anyway.
    Neutral:
    -cranks, too long, but no worse than the others.
    -bottom bracket height, again, if you have a short rider, and a short travel bike you can give them short cranks and drop that bracket down.

    Notice how the other 2 full suspension bikes are really similar in geo to an adult 27.5 bike? Save for standover and seattube length.
    So, another option to consider is to put get a 24" wheelset for an adult bike for a while if standover is to high for the kid.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    153
    Thanks Tjaard, that's very helpful.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: string's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,549
    Got the ripcord built up last week. Turned out pretty nice. There was not too much wrong with the stock spec build (cranks too long and saddle to long...covered more of the top tube than I would have liked) but since I had the parts I figured might as well upgrade. I also cut the handlebars from 27" to 25" and am still playing with the hope levers (the older tech levers don't play well with the optical gear display). droped the weight from around 30lbs to 26lbs.

    The stock Kenda kinetics turned out to be a folding version and weighed in around 690 grams (nicer tires than I anticipated). I have some schwalbe Fat Albert 24's on the way for a tubeless meatier option (although the Kenda's are better than I thought so might send back). The Maxxis snypers are a little narrow and could use a little bit bigger knobs in my opinion.

    Couple pics...pretty sure one could not fit a 26" in the rear.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Transition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig-ricpord-complete.jpg  

    Transition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig-ripcord-front.jpg  

    Transition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig-ripcord-mid-stay.jpg  

    Transition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig-ripcord-rear-drive.jpg  

    Transition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig-ripocord-toptube.jpg  

    Transition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig-ripocrd-shifter.jpg  


  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,016
    Nice bikebling! The blue spokes rock! And that weight is great for a full suspension bike with high end but not crazy parts.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: string's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,549
    Quote Originally Posted by Tjaard View Post
    Nice bikebling! The blue spokes rock! And that weight is great for a full suspension bike with high end but not crazy parts.
    Thanks, I was building the wheels for a black frame and then the blue on the transition came along as a bonus. The spokes added some weight but sometimes you just have to go for looks.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    416
    String - do you have a build thread or a list of changes you did on the bike? How's your kid liking it. It would be interesting to have kids do a back to back review of the Ripcord and Norco Fluid.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: string's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,549
    Here is the build comparing to stock. Not a lot of ride time yet between school, weather, & commitments but I think he will like it. Adapting to the bigger frame is a bit intimidating at first.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Transition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig-image.jpg  


  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    348
    Quote Originally Posted by string View Post
    Adapting to the bigger frame is a bit intimidating at first.
    that's always been my experience with my son - every time he steps up to a bigger frame there's a short term step back in confidence. the jump in frame size from his 20" wheeled bike to the ripcord was substantial, and he didn't blink an eye. especially on the dh, he was riding faster and hitting things with more confidence right away. i think whatever issues the increase in size may have introduced, the geometry more can compensated for

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: string's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,549
    Final build swapping out the Maxxis Snypers for Schwalbe Fat Albert R. Added about a pound a ton of tread.

    I tried mounting tubeless but could not get the schwalbe's to mount with the Deviant Rims using stans tape. A 24' tubeless rim strip might work but have not found one and didn't want to guinea pig my son by making one. It was a very loose bead which makes me think the deviant might be a little undersized.

    We will get the first real ride this weekend.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Transition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig-ripcord-final-wiht-big-tires.jpg  


  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    54
    Wow, looks great. I'm impressed with the weight too. Thanks for sharing, look forward to the post-ride report.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    270
    nice build!!!

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by string View Post
    Final build swapping out the Maxxis Snypers for Schwalbe Fat Albert R. Added about a pound a ton of tread.

    I tried mounting tubeless but could not get the schwalbe's to mount with the Deviant Rims using stans tape. A 24' tubeless rim strip might work but have not found one and didn't want to guinea pig my son by making one. It was a very loose bead which makes me think the deviant might be a little undersized.

    We will get the first real ride this weekend.
    Any chance you got a weight on the frame/shock only?
    I emailed Transition and got a "we don't know."
    My 6yr old son is on a 18.5lb bike I built him but would like to get him some rear suspension if it actually works and doesn't weigh a ton.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by Right seat driver View Post
    Any chance you got a weight on the frame/shock only?
    I emailed Transition and got a "we don't know."
    My 6yr old son is on a 18.5lb bike I built him but would like to get him some rear suspension if it actually works and doesn't weigh a ton.

    I was wondering the same thing....LOL!!!! BTW, what kind of 18lb bike did you build him?

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    348
    my (our?) 2 month review of the ripcord: Reviewed: Transition Ripcord - NSMB.com

  38. #38
    Stand back
    Reputation: dbabuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,210
    Quote Originally Posted by Tjaard View Post
    Think about a child 2/3 of and adult's height, to get a similar feel, they should have a crank that's 2/3 as long, ie 117 mm long.
    Everything else you said is fairly reasonable, but 117 is a super short crank. Kids aren't generally 100% scaled down adults, I think in general, their legs are longer proportionally to their torsos. Except my son, he's built just like a lego man. Hope he grows out of that...
    Golden Bike Park

    Golden Connector Trails need your support!

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by string View Post
    The stock Kenda kinetics turned out to be a folding version and weighed in around 690 grams (nicer tires than I anticipated).
    I'd like to get some of those Kendas for my son but I don't see them on the Kenda site and they don't appear in the 2015 bicycle tire catalog either... maybe they are an OEM only model?

    Currently he's got the Snypers but they could use a bit larger tread in my opinion...

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    981
    is it a standard 20 spline BB tool you need to remove the ISIS BB or one of the 8 spline ones. got the 20 spline.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    3
    Does anyone have have a frame weight?

  42. #42
    Dr. Pepper drinker
    Reputation: catch22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,634
    Quote Originally Posted by Right seat driver View Post
    Does anyone have have a frame weight?
    I ordered one of the 2015s for our daughter and got it today. She's not getting it til her birthday in January and in the meantime I'm pulling everything apart, getting weights, trying to figure out where the biggest potential savings will be, and then plan to build up with some lighter options. Frame with shock, headset, and seat QR came to 2400 grams on a Park DS1 (I'm assuming it's fairly accurate). The RS XC 32 fork was 2140 grams with steerer cut to 6" so it's definitely a goner. I'm going to try to put a spreadsheet together with all the weights and can try to post up if anyone wants to see it.
    Sipping the Knolly Whisquillappa

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    291
    Quote Originally Posted by catch22 View Post
    I ordered one of the 2015s for our daughter and got it today. She's not getting it til her birthday in January...
    Noooo, that's almost like torture! How can you manage to hide it from the kid for THAT long?

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12
    @catch22 - I'd really appreciate a copy of the spreadsheet. I've just bought a ripcord for my eldest in the 2015 clearance sales (in the UK) and I plan to swap out a few parts so the component weight would be really helpful to know.

    I build a custom Scott Spark 20 Jr for when she was younger - build thread is here - Build report - custom Scott Spark 20 Junior « Singletrack Forum.

    The information on MTBR threads was a big help when building that bike.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    981
    wheels 2kg
    fork 2kg
    BB 310g
    crank will weight it after work
    seat post - not a clue as I put a reverb on
    tyres 760g
    tubes ~170g IIRC
    kept saddle
    didn't weigh cassette, mech or shifter but swapped to zee shifter, slx mech and XT 10sp cassette so probably saved a few grams but not much
    stem ~ 145g
    bar ~ 220g

    the biggest bits are the wheels and forks. think I saved ~ 780g swapping them

  46. #46
    Dr. Pepper drinker
    Reputation: catch22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,634
    I'll get the full list I've got up tomorrow. I weighed everything with a postage scale last week so it should be a fairly accurate list. Poah is right on about fork and wheels being a huge opportunity to drop weight. Cranks need to go because of length so I'm considering options there. Really want to go with a two piece crank with external BB but 104 bcd options are really hard to come by. Tires also could see a big drop with a swap to the Schwalbes.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12
    Thanks Poah and catch22.

    I managed to get a pair of ZTR crest 24" rims on ebay (clearance sale) and I've a spare pair of 240s hubs so they will be going off to be built as soon as I can find a box for them.

    Tyres - I've not done much homework yet but in Europe Bike24 - Online Shop - Cycling, Running, Swimming, Triathlon - Bike parts, Racing Cycles, Mountainbike (MTB), Bike Wear, Sportswear has good deals on quite a few 24" tyres.

    Looks like a swap of bar (spares box - Easton MonkeyLite c.135g), stem and possibly grips will lose a bit of weight as well.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    981
    The ones at 25 each - I missed that by minutes lol

    crank 752g
    r mech 290g
    cassette 446g
    chain 262g
    shifter 162g
    sear post 256
    f brake 288g (caliper, hose & lever)

  49. #49
    Dr. Pepper drinker
    Reputation: catch22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,634
    Well, here's what I've got. My weights all seem really close to Poah so I think we can assume these are all pretty close. I included a bunch of notes I've made regarding possible changes and weight savings. I likely won't do all of this (at least right away) but there is potential to save well over 3000g from the stock build and have the complete around 22-23 lbs. At this point I was just shooting for 25lbs but we'll see where it ends up once all is finished.

    Transition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig-ripcord.jpg
    Sipping the Knolly Whisquillappa

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    981
    The hubs are novatec

  51. #51
    Dr. Pepper drinker
    Reputation: catch22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,634
    I can't find a weight listing for these anywhere but I suspect they'll be right in line with most other mid level two piece alloy cranks. I really wanted to get away from square taper or ISIS BBs and this gets that done but sticks with 104bcd at a pretty good price. Lots of size options as well but I went with the 135mm. With all the charts out there it's a tough call but I figure at 73 inches tall I'm comfortable on a 175, If I used that ratio for her (probably 53" or so come spring) that a 135 should suit her well for a couple years. Web coupon knocked the cost down 15%. I'll get some weights up whenever they arrive:
    GT Speed AL Cranks at J&R Bicycles
    Sipping the Knolly Whisquillappa

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12
    @poah and catch22 - many thanks!

    I can get cracking now on looking through the spares box and sort out some weight saving changes without also having to weigh all the stock parts.

    Bike should be with me on Wednesday. Looking forward to seeing it.

  53. #53
    Dr. Pepper drinker
    Reputation: catch22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,634
    Quote Originally Posted by catch22 View Post
    I can't find a weight listing for these anywhere but I suspect they'll be right in line with most other mid level two piece alloy cranks. I really wanted to get away from square taper or ISIS BBs and this gets that done but sticks with 104bcd at a pretty good price. Lots of size options as well but I went with the 135mm. With all the charts out there it's a tough call but I figure at 73 inches tall I'm comfortable on a 175, If I used that ratio for her (probably 53" or so come spring) that a 135 should suit her well for a couple years. Web coupon knocked the cost down 15%. I'll get some weights up whenever they arrive:
    GT Speed AL Cranks at J&R Bicycles

    Got the GT crankset from J&R today and gotta say I'm very happy with them. Box included the crankset and the anodized blue external BB (looks like it's a Shimano Deore by the markings/seals) and ano blue chainring bolts. Cranks/ chainring bolts are 558 grams and the external BB is 105 grams. Add a 30t N/W ring and it should be right at 693 grams for the setup vs 1102 grams for the stock setup (737 for cranks/bolts/chainring and 365 for the BB).

    Also got some 24 hole gold straight pull Koozer hubs off ebay that have the following weights:
    173 front
    286 rear
    85 skewers
    Stans Crest 24h 24" rims are also in and they are coming in at 320 grams per rim.

    Estimated weight for the Koozer hubs to Crests with DT comps and alloy nips is coming in right at 1400 grams vs 2069 for the stock wheels.

    Picked up 3 Schwalbe Rocket Rons and those averaged 431 grams each. A pair at 862 grams vs the stock Kendas at 1522 offers some huge weight savings.

    All in all the full tubeless wheelset with tires mounted should be around 2448 grams. That's 1670 grams (3.68 lbs) saved over the stock setup!

    Still working on a fork and debating whether I want to mess with pedals, guide, bars, stem, or post.
    Sipping the Knolly Whisquillappa

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    981
    wtonh thread

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12
    Thanks for the update. You could look for an Easton monkeylite SL on ebay and match with a KCNC flyride stem. 25.4mm parts are much cheaper and often lighter.

    I think that would save quite a bit of weight.

  56. #56
    Dr. Pepper drinker
    Reputation: catch22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,634
    Transition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig-ripcord1.jpgTransition - new 24" miniature all mountain rig-ripcord2.jpg

    I finally have this build mostly together and definitely happy with how it turned out. As pictured it's 23.6 lbs. At this point the only changes I've got planned are to put some other pedals on, just not sure which ones I'm going to go with yet. I had a set of Mallets sitting around so I put those on so I could ride it around and make sure everything was in working order. Everything was pretty straightforward with the build but I would try to avoid tapered forks if you are building one up. It added some significant headaches to the process due to the super short headtube not playing nice with the taper on this fork. She'll be getting this for her birthday in a couple weeks and hopefully out on trail whenever winter allows us to see some dirt again (or we head south for a weekend). I'm curious to see how she'll handle the transition from the 20" but she's really tall for a soon to be 7 year old so I think it will work out alright.
    Sipping the Knolly Whisquillappa

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    981
    I'd be careful with those QRs and check them for coming loose.

    You shouldn't have had any issue with the taper with an external cup. The length of the steerer shouldn't have any effect on the steerer fitting.

  58. #58
    Dr. Pepper drinker
    Reputation: catch22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,634
    Quote Originally Posted by POAH View Post
    I'd be careful with those QRs and check them for coming loose.

    You shouldn't have had any issue with the taper with an external cup. The length of the steerer shouldn't have any effect on the steerer fitting.
    Yeah, I'm going to keep a close watch on the QRs. If the stock ones are becoming problematic I'll swap something more reliable on there.

    I promise you that the external cup doesn't cure the issue, not even close unfortunately. When I first mentioned the problem on your thread that was with the external cup installed. Being that it was a tapered going on I had the external lower ready to go since you can't use a tapered steerer with a 44ZS lower. It's possible that the taper on some newer forks is a bit lower down but on the 2010-2011 Rockshox line it runs about 5mm to high for the ultra short headtube on this frame. To remedy the issue I tracked down a +3mm lower crown race that is made for some fatbikes to fit the Bluto dials under the downtube. With that it was a bit closer but I still had to do some file work on the blue upper race that is integrated into the upper assembly on the Cane Creek 40 series headsets. The frustrating thing is no one makes an EC44 upper cup unless you want to run an Angleset. If someone did that would have been the instant solution to the probelm. What would have been perfect was this: The PVD EC44 PlusFifteen | Peter Verdone Designs
    But unfortunately he said that was a one off he made to cure the same issue on a frame he built. At some point I may get in touch with a machine shop to see if I could get something similar made (or just pick up a different fork). At this point it is together and seems to be holding preload but I put way more force into the topcap than I typically would. Will see what happens with a little riding time on it.
    Sipping the Knolly Whisquillappa

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    981
    I put a debonair air can on the monarch R, made a big difference to the small bump/initial stroke.

    I've got a set of crests and novatec 771/712 hubs coming, need to decied wither I get C-xray or standard DB spokes.

  60. #60
    Dr. Pepper drinker
    Reputation: catch22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,634
    Quote Originally Posted by POAH View Post
    I put a debonair air can on the monarch R, made a big difference to the small bump/initial stroke.

    I've got a set of crests and novatec 771/712 hubs coming, need to decied wither I get C-xray or standard DB spokes.
    Good to know that Debonair is working well on there. I may end up making that swap sometime down the road. What's been the biggest gain with it vs the stock setup, making better use of the travel?

    The Crests seem really nice so far. They seated up tubeless with Orange Seal with a floor pump no problem. One had to be reinflated the next day and both have been holding air since then.
    Sipping the Knolly Whisquillappa

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    981
    cause of the low weight of the boy the suspension is more active and moves easier on certain hits rather than bucking him up.

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3,068
    Quote Originally Posted by catch22 View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ripcord1.jpg 
Views:	111 
Size:	235.4 KB 
ID:	1040522Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ripcord2.jpg 
Views:	267 
Size:	240.6 KB 
ID:	1040523

    I finally have this build mostly together and definitely happy with how it turned out. As pictured it's 23.6 lbs. At this point the only changes I've got planned are to put some other pedals on, just not sure which ones I'm going to go with yet. I had a set of Mallets sitting around so I put those on so I could ride it around and make sure everything was in working order. Everything was pretty straightforward with the build but I would try to avoid tapered forks if you are building one up. It added some significant headaches to the process due to the super short headtube not playing nice with the taper on this fork. She'll be getting this for her birthday in a couple weeks and hopefully out on trail whenever winter allows us to see some dirt again (or we head south for a weekend). I'm curious to see how she'll handle the transition from the 20" but she's really tall for a soon to be 7 year old so I think it will work out alright.
    Just purchased this Ripcord from catch22 for my soon to be 7 year old girl.
    Was searching for a Pineridge but the used ones were outrageously priced and when I came across this FS bike at essentially the same weight and less money, it just made sense. Our terrain is very rough and I feel I'll have more flexibility to visit different trails with her on a FS.
    I have gathered a few Alibaba cf parts and a few left over big bike parts, but catch22 deserves most of the credit for getting the weight down. I hope to get the bike closer to 23.0# but I'll probably miss the target by 1/4#. Which is fine.
    Interestingly enough my daughter's 20" Cannondale (no suspension, no gears, no front brake) weighs 23# as well. Her 24" Hotrocks HT weighs 29.8#. So the upgrade should be amazing.

    Some parts awaiting the bike to arrive today.

    Will update in a month or so.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3,068
    Lightest Ripcord ever maybe @ 22.1#?

    This bike rides great and my girl is doing great on it.



    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 04-11-2019 at 02:48 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. Transition Double for All Mountain?
    By Dirtjumper02 in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 06-02-2014, 11:16 PM
  2. Describe the Transition "ride" for me...
    By titusquasi in forum Transition Bikes
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-23-2013, 03:40 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-16-2011, 10:55 AM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-01-2011, 10:56 AM
  5. Looking for a MINIATURE model - 951
    By Gigs in forum Intense
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-01-2011, 07:31 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.