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  1. #1
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    How hard is it to lace up some kids wheels?

    I'm interested in lacing some Stan's Crest wheels for my kid potentially. Its that or buy some, which isn't bad either but I'd like to pickout some decent stuff...particularly an XD hub so I can run 10-42 cassette instead of 11-46 (same range). I was thinking some Crest 24" i23 rims, Bitex XD hubs and decent spokes. I think it would pencil out around 350$ or so if I get a discount here or there. I dunno...maybe its not worth the hassle. Fwiw I have built my own bike from a frame etc...but not wheels (or headset/bb pressing).

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by svinyard View Post
    o I can run 10-42 cassette instead of 11-46 (same range)
    better off running the 11-46 as it give a greater climbing gear.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by POAH View Post
    better off running the 11-46 as it give a greater climbing gear.
    10-42 has 420% gear range. 11-46 has 418% gear range. If you run 30t on the 10-42 and 32t on the 11-46 you get the same gain ratio for the easiest gear. you get a slightly higher gain ratio on the hardest gear. so 10-42 can be just as easy and go faster

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerpss View Post
    10-42 has 420% gear range. 11-46 has 418% gear range. If you run 30t on the 10-42 and 32t on the 11-46 you get the same gain ratio for the easiest gear. you get a slightly higher gain ratio on the hardest gear. so 10-42 can be just as easy and go faster
    you completely missed the point didn't you.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by POAH View Post
    you completely missed the point didn't you.
    Not trying to argue. i'm still missing the point and confused. you said 11-46 gives an easier climbing gear but 10-42 can be equally as easy.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerpss View Post
    Not trying to argue. i'm still missing the point and confused. you said 11-46 gives an easier climbing gear but 10-42 can be equally as easy.
    no it can't. a 30t +42 isn't going to be as easy as a 30t + 46.

  7. #7
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    I think I'm confused as well but no big deal unless I'm missing something critical. An e13 cassette 9-46 will climb just as good as an eagle 10-50 cassette assuming the chainring is appropriate.

    Maybe POAH you were assuming the stock chainring would be used, therefore the 11-46 would be better? In this case, I'll be buying new cranks most likely, which come with my choice of chainring, as most 24" come with 155 heavy NX stuff and an inappropriate 32t. Not sure tho.

    Regardless, have you guys laced your own rims? How hard is it? I don't have a truing stand or spoke tensioner...that might bump the cost into the realm of just buying some from a builder.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by svinyard View Post
    I think I'm confused as well but no big deal unless I'm missing something critical. An e13 cassette 9-46 will climb just as good as an eagle 10-50 cassette assuming the chainring is appropriate.

    Maybe POAH you were assuming the stock chainring would be used, therefore the 11-46 would be better? In this case, I'll be buying new cranks most likely as most 24" come with 155 heavy NX stuff. Not sure tho.

    Regardless, have you guys laced your own rims? How hard is it? I don't have a truing stand or spoke tensioner...that might bump the cost into the realm of just buying some from a builder.
    I was assuming you pick whichever chainring you want so you can make 10-42 just as easy by dropping down 2 teeth on the chainring. He is correct that if you use the same chainring in both instances the 11-46 is easier.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by svinyard View Post
    I think I'm confused as well but no big deal unless I'm missing something critical. An e13 cassette 9-46 will climb just as good as an eagle 10-50 cassette assuming the chainring is appropriate.

    Maybe POAH you were assuming the stock chainring would be used, therefore the 11-46 would be better? In this case, I'll be buying new cranks most likely, which come with my choice of chainring, as most 24" come with 155 heavy NX stuff and an inappropriate 32t. Not sure tho.

    Regardless, have you guys laced your own rims? How hard is it? I don't have a truing stand or spoke tensioner...that might bump the cost into the realm of just buying some from a builder.
    never laced rims before but they are not going to be any different to large ones at a guess. The NX crank is pretty good and you can run a 28t with it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by POAH View Post
    never laced rims before but they are not going to be any different to large ones at a guess. The NX crank is pretty good and you can run a 28t with it.
    Cool, thanks! Didn't know it could go so low.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by svinyard View Post
    Cool, thanks! Didn't know it could go so low.
    This is what I have on lewis's NX crank on his trannie scout.

    https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/.../rp-prod144537

  12. #12
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    Personally, wheel building is the one area I won't touch and I'll pretty much do anything else brake bleeding, fork or suspension seatpost rebuilds, headsets, etc.. I have done it before and I'm a really dexterous and meticulous person but it's something you need to have a good truing stand for and do routinely to be any good at it.
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  13. #13
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    I built first set of wheels (20" kids wheels) by taking a 1 on 1 class with a local bike shop. If you have access to something similar I highly recommend it - the cost for me was basically the same as having the shop build it. I also found Roger Musson's wheelbuilding book to be very helpful. The tool that I've found super useful is nipple driver (it's covered by Roger Musson's book)that allows you to tightened down spokes to an equal distance quickly and easily. If you're into doing stuff yourself I would say go for it! It also gives you an excuse to get more tools

  14. #14
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    It's not hard at all, just double/triple check everything. Lacing is the easy part. Tensioning and truing(laterally and radially) is what takes the most time. For sure get Musson's book. Too bad you missed the $30/rim sale for the Crests....

    That being said, this is actually pretty good deal:

    https://www.trailcraftcycles.com/pro...raft-wheelset/

  15. #15
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    I've built a half dozen big bike wheels. Little ones aren't any different really. I do ok with a stand and tension by feel. Probably not perfect but I raced dh and they held up! It still takes me a long time and I paid the lbs to build my last set as I was in a time pinch.

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by svinyard View Post
    I'm interested in lacing some Stan's Crest wheels for my kid potentially. Its that or buy some, which isn't bad either but I'd like to pickout some decent stuff...particularly an XD hub so I can run 10-42 cassette instead of 11-46 (same range). I was thinking some Crest 24" i23 rims, Bitex XD hubs and decent spokes. I think it would pencil out around 350$ or so if I get a discount here or there. I dunno...maybe its not worth the hassle. Fwiw I have built my own bike from a frame etc...but not wheels (or headset/bb pressing).
    It's no harder than building full size wheels.

    Quote Originally Posted by jestep View Post
    Personally, wheel building is the one area I won't touch and I'll pretty much do anything else brake bleeding, fork or suspension seatpost rebuilds, headsets, etc.. I have done it before and I'm a really dexterous and meticulous person but it's something you need to have a good truing stand for and do routinely to be any good at it.
    You don't NEED a shop stand, you don't need to spend 300 bucks on a Park pro truing stand. You CAN if you want to. I've built 3 dozen wheelsets on a cheap arse Spin Doctor stand. I might splurge this season and get the CRC truing stand, its 83 and just about as good as the Park Pro stand. The thing is, if you've never learned to build wheels before it will "SEEM" insurmountable, but really its not that hard. The hard part is deciding to do it and putting in the time to learn and read about the techniques. Getting over our fear of the unknown is the hardest part of it imo.

  17. #17
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    I'm no slouch to obsessing and learning new stuff but is it really that much to learn? Can't I just watch a few YouTube tutorials and go at it? Seems like that's how I fix/do everything these days (bike or anything else)

  18. #18
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    I recently learned and built 6 carbon wheels. I also relaced one 20'' wheel with less spokes. I read Roger Musson's ebook. It is cheap, has all the info you need, and it is all in one place. You could certainly go through wheel building threads and youtube and find the same information for free. From tools, you only really need a nipple wrench. Everything else makes the job easier. I built a truing stand and dish tool from plywood, and bought nipple wrenches, nipple driver (unless using hex head nipples), and park tension meter.

  19. #19
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    That's how I did it! Watched a number of videos and tried to replicate. As someone said above, lacing is (relatively) easy, truing is what takes some time and patience. Still think I did all right with just a hacked version of a stand (using a fork and two zip ties).

    Also make sure you have the length of the spokes figured out correctly.

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