How to choose the correct tires, and more importantly tire air pressure for small on- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    How to choose the correct tires, and more importantly tire air pressure for small on

    2 questions: what are the good 24" mountain bike choices? I have Rocket Rons on my kids new Ripcord and they are clearly fast and light tires. But I'm curious what my other tubeless options are as she is quickly getting in to very chunky terrain? I saw a 24" DHF, and I don't want that as she isn't exactly shredding the downhills. Some other guys mentioned some other tire, maybe made by Spawn? Seems like the Spawn for a front and sticking with the Rocket Ron's for the rear might be a good way to go.

    Most importantly, how do I choose an appropriate air pressure when my 7 year old can't express how the tires feel? Should I just set them at some really low pressure (she weighs 47#) like 10 front & 13 rear and watch for wheel strikes or what?

    Please advise.

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  2. #2
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    I would DEF go with Spawn Maxtions as they are similar to a lighter-weight DHF for kids without the heavy duty sidewalls etc. About 100g heavier per tire than RR (540 vs 440). We run them at 15psi tubeless rear and about 13 rear. Sometimes its 18r and 15f or more if rocky aggressive terrain.

    Rocket Rons are a XC tire. If you aren't XC racing, the Maxtion is MUCH safer tire in my opinion and strikes a very nice balance between grip and weight. There is a reason I haven't seen a Rocket Ron on our trails here in the last 3 yrs. Most adults are running a High Roller or something like a DHF/Aggressor. It doesn't take much to slip a front tire and kids aren't great at picking nice lines so having a more forgiving tire makes a lot of sense. I just don't think its worth it, it only takes one unnecessary crash on a slick/loose/edgy spot.

    The DHF are just too heavy and I'd only run those when we'd really need a strong sidewall. Here in the PNW that would be more for park days or an Enduro race (tho even then we'd prob still be on the Maxtion). Fwiw we run Maxtions exclusively for now until someone makes something similar with legit side nobs etc. Right now no one does unless its super heavy. We did race the normal Maxtion in a rocky DH race (6yr on 20" maxtion) and the kid slashed a side wall on a jump when I was running 18psi. I ran about 24psi from there out (didn't have a bunch of spare tires like an idiot) and it went great from there.

  3. #3
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    That's great info, now the question is: Just 1 Spawn Maxtion for the front only, or 2 for front and rear? I typically run a more aggressive front tire myself to try and maintain some rolling speed so I was imagining using the same thought process for her bike.

    Pressures seem high!

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    That's great info, now the question is: Just 1 Spawn Maxtion for the front only, or 2 for front and rear? I typically run a more aggressive front tire myself to try and maintain some rolling speed so I was imagining using the same thought process for her bike.

    Pressures seem high!

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Id go both front and rear. I also ride a harder tire in the rear, but it's still got big side nobs etc. I don't think their is another tire I like for the rear in 24". Good idea but no options that I like personally, maybe someone else knows something I don't tho. YMMV

  5. #5
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    We have always been one extreme or another.
    His big bike park tires are a High roller 2.5 on the front with DH casing and a fat Albert on the rear .. the high roller alone weighs more than BOTH wheels... itís a monster.

    These however are as much to protect the rims ... we cycled miles with him on the RRís and despite me puncturing and ripping tyres he never has (I probably shouldnít tempt fate)

    I have some Hans Dampf on orde for 2mo.. that still didnít arrive.

  6. #6
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    She is definitely not as aggressive/ experienced as some of your boys, or as strong. And generally drifting a rear tire isn't such a big deal anyways and you can even argue it's skill building.

    I've learned from my own riding that even when I push hard over aggressive terrain, there is more time to be gained with decent rolling tires than really high traction tires.

    I'm going to try the fancy Spawn tire for the front but for now stick with the RRs in the rear. The bike I bought came with 2 of these that looked barely used, plus a brand new one still in the box. I don't think she'll burn through this stock pile of tires in the 3 years she'll be on this bike, but I hope I'm wrong.

    A year from now I'll reassess.

    As for air pressure, those suggested pressures seem really high. Just following her, her rear tire shows no signs of even flexing even a little bit under her weight over bumps. I think I'll do something more like 13 front & 15 rear to start with.

  7. #7
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    Carry a spare tube and whatís the worst ... I think we have been lucky on the RRs given Jnr is pretty aggressive but we also ride a lot of places with more roots and loam than sharp rock. We do ride other places but less often and so far the luck has held.

  8. #8
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    For air pressure I ride behind my son and add/remove based on how it looks like the bike is responding. He is 5 but rides steep rocky stuff and weighs nearly what your daughter does. I haven't actually checked the psi. It definitely makes a difference on his riding. Generally it's really low pressure. Guessing 12psi or so. Also on a rocket Ron 24". Setup tubeless. No evidence of rim or tire damage so far. The RR seems great as a front tire for us. The scaling for a sub 50lbs kid is really different. My son is pretty fast and hasn't had issues with front grip. This isn't a dh bike, but our local ride had a 1500' decent that's rocky and technical. Eventually he will get heavy and fast enough to need more in the front but we aren't close to that yet.

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  9. #9
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    So I'm coming up with air pressure in the same range as you. At 15-18psi her back tire does't sag even a little from what I can tell. 10-13psi is the correct range imo.

    Your point about the RR being fine at their weight rings true with me as well. My daughter recklessly turns her bike in loose terrain and it doesn't slide in places where if I was that aggressive on these tires I'd be on my butt.

    However, as a precaution she is getting the Spawn tire as a front this week.
    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 03-24-2019 at 04:19 AM.

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