20 or 24" For Almost 7 year- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,155

    20 or 24" For Almost 7 year

    My almost 7 year old is 48" tall (will measure her inseam tomorrow) and has grown 2" in the last 6 months. She's has a Cleary 16" bike now which she could ride a bit longer. I was planning to get her a 20" bike, but with her growing like a weed, I'm wondering if it's better to invest a little more in a 24" bike instead.

    Would a 24" be way too big? Seems like the Cleary Meerkat could be an option - https://www.clearybikes.com/products/meerkat-24-5-speed if her inseam is 22" or more. Did other people jump from a 16" to 24" bike?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    109
    My 7 year old has been riding a 24” since was 6 and 3 months, it fits him great! Check out the size charts on the bike’s website. Inseam is most important. My 5 year old is still too short for a 24, so he’ll be getting a 20”.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rabitoblanco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    125
    My 7 yr. old has been on a 24" since he was just under 5, for his trail bike. It's great for the general reasons adults like 29ers (in comparison to his 20")
    He also consistently played with a 16" as his "tricks" bike.
    By the height of your little one, sounds like it would make sense--but you've got the right idea with inseam. If they can stand, the calculation is steeped much more to the 24.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,155
    I just measured her and she's 48" with a 22" inseam. The Woom 5 has a min seat height of 26.4". So it may be a bit big for her for another 6-12 months or so.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    7
    Even though cost wise going with a 24" might be better on your pocket book, It might be worth finding a 20" for a while. I'm assuming the 16" is a typical no frills bike: Jumping up 8" on a wheel size, adding shifter(s), hand brakes and no coaster brake could be a little intimating for her, and frustrating for both of you with the learning curve.
    On a side note, whatever bike you decide to go with, check the adjustability of both the shifters and lever reach. Bought our 8 y/o(same as yours- tall for her age, growing like a weed) a new bike this spring, I ended up having to swap shifters and brake levers when I discovered that there wasn't enough adjustment in the levers. Had to do both (levers & shifters) since the original spec'd parts were one piece units. Good luck




    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,155
    Thanks all. I think I'll go with the woom 5 but wait a year or two. In the meantime, I'll probably get her the Raleigh Lilly as a tweener bike

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    1,728
    My opinion is that at these young ages, skill development is vastly the priority if you are really mountain biking with a kid. The smaller bike definitely facilitates this more so. But yeah you are on the bubble. Usually 50in or so is ideally when they could jump up and still be able to manual a little etc. Its winter and the kid is growing, prob a good idea to just get a 24"...BUT make sure it's not a super long one. You want chainstays around 380 to 390mm. Norco, Rocky Mtn, Prevelo, Spawn, Trailcraft all make a nice hardtail with good geo. You can look at Trail Craft to see ideal geometry for a hardtail or XC/Trail style FS bike. Itll be weird for the kid to jump from 16" to 24"...but a lot of consistent time on the bike (dont raise the seat) will solve that. They will be a pilot not a passenger in no time. As always a 16" BMX is great at this size, they are an awesome skill dev/neighborhood bike that will last for yrs and are cheap on craigslist.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Posts
    2
    I'd go with a 20" but look for a brand that uses a 451 mm wheel instead of a 406 mm since standover height isnt likely to be an issue. On the flip-side if you do get a 24 inch bike I'd be looking for brands with a 507 mm wheelset instead of a 520 or 540.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,795
    I started my 7 year old on her 7th birthday at 47.5" tall on a 24" Ripcord and she instantly was way better on it than the Cannondale 20" she already had. In 1 day she went from being able to ride .5-1 mile of single-track to being able to comfortably knock out 7 miles. Literally this happened in 1 day.

    She was still too short to comfortably start off by her self (she isn't very coordinated) when she first got it because her groin pretty much was on the cross bar (electrical tape and some plumbing insulation on the crossbar helps here). I can't say I agree with Transition's size range recommendations of 44" - 60". Now she is 7.75 years of age and nearly 52" tall (which is quite tall for her age) and the bike is fitting her really well utilizing a short 40mm stem, short cranks, seat slammed and slid forward, and low narrow bars. And of course she is taking off fine now, even on uphills.

    I'd guess at 53 - 54" the current set up with just the seat raised a bit will have this bike fitting her ideally. Then as she grows taller I'll raise the seat and slide it back, extend the stem, etc... to stretch the bike out. Transition says the bike will fit until she is 60" tall but that seems unlikely but I'll stretch it to 58" for sure.

    Ultimately the bike will last us for 10" of growth total and several years of riding making it a darn good value imo. She has progressed so much.

    I'm hoping to just be able to jump her straight to her Mom's 27.5" Small Mondraker from the 24" but that's a pretty big jump and I'm missing about 4" of height range in the middle that I'm not sure I can compensate for on a Mondraker.

    Sorry, got off track. Yes, buy her a quality 24" bike and don't look back!

  10. #10
    Friendly Neighborhood MTBer
    Reputation: kabayan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    244
    Generally speaking, she should probably be on a 24" wheel bike. Having said that, frame sizes are quite different for the same wheel size. My almost 7 year old has almost outgrown her 20" bike. She tried our neighbor's 20" bike and it was just the right size for her. My older kid has gone through 3 different frames in the 24" wheel size.
    If you can't play, display.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,155
    Well, I found the Raleigh Lily 20 for $261 shipped through Crimson Bikes so I went with that. I didn't want Santa giving her a bike and then having to wait 6 months - 1 year to ride it. And we'll pass down this bike to her sister and family - so should get at least 3 years out of it. I'm also not sure what sort of 24" we should get -- road cruising (Woom 5) vs something more for trails, but will get a better feel in a year or two as to the type of riding we're doing the most.

Similar Threads

  1. 20-20 Stache 8 or 20-20 Fuel EX?
    By CRAZY FRED in forum 26+/27.5+/29+ Plus Bikes
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-20-2019, 10:25 AM
  2. 20" or 24" for 7 year old
    By CtrlAltElite in forum Families and Riding with Kids
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-13-2019, 11:25 PM
  3. Picking a 20" bike over 21" despite riding 20" bike
    By jhbalaji in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-13-2016, 09:16 PM
  4. Replies: 26
    Last Post: 06-21-2012, 07:16 AM
  5. "Kliane" "Klein" "Quasi Moto" "Paul"
    By stan4bikes in forum Vintage, Retro, Classic
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-20-2007, 03:36 AM

Members who have read this thread: 17

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.