Owning Ibis Ripley and Evil Following cool or too much overlap?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Owning Ibis Ripley and Evil Following cool or too much overlap?

    I bought an original Ripley back in 2013. Been riding the crap out of it since. To date it is my favorite bike ever. I also own a Tranny 29er that I barely ride, 48 years old and my bones just don't enjoy HT's anymore. I also owned a Mojo 3 this past summer but sold it. The plus tire thing doesn't really do it for me. I live in Michigan so the trails I ride are very flowy up and down singletrack riding. Technical uphills with rollers on the way down but nothing like outwest crazy downhills. Been having a hankering for a new bike. Was thinking of the SB5 or Evil Calling but talked to a very knowledgable guy at wrench science and after talking to me for a good amount of time and finding out what I ride, how I ride and what I enjoy about riding he suggested I get the Evil Following. He said it would replace both my Tranny and Ripley. However not really sure I want to replace my Ripley but would love to own the Following in addition to the Ripley. Keep in mind my Ripley is the OG version with a 120mm fork. HA is 70 degrees and it rides like a great XC bike. So if anyone has ridden both you think owning both the Ripley and Following will be overkill or just fine?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by procos View Post
    I bought an original Ripley back in 2013. Been riding the crap out of it since. To date it is my favorite bike ever. I also own a Tranny 29er that I barely ride, 48 years old and my bones just don't enjoy HT's anymore. I also owned a Mojo 3 this past summer but sold it. The plus tire thing doesn't really do it for me. I live in Michigan so the trails I ride are very flowy up and down singletrack riding. Technical uphills with rollers on the way down but nothing like outwest crazy downhills. Been having a hankering for a new bike. Was thinking of the SB5 or Evil Calling but talked to a very knowledgable guy at wrench science and after talking to me for a good amount of time and finding out what I ride, how I ride and what I enjoy about riding he suggested I get the Evil Following. He said it would replace both my Tranny and Ripley. However not really sure I want to replace my Ripley but would love to own the Following in addition to the Ripley. Keep in mind my Ripley is the OG version with a 120mm fork. HA is 70 degrees and it rides like a great XC bike. So if anyone has ridden both you think owning both the Ripley and Following will be overkill or just fine?
    buy a following and you will be selling that ripley within a month!!

  3. #3
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    Buy the Following and you can always sell it.
    And you can tune your Rip for more performance. What tires and wheels are you using. What fork.
    You may want to use the new regular Rip frame with 148 Boost and a 110 Boost fork. More tuning options with rim width and tires. Plus tires aren't a one trick thing. Rim width, tire width, tire profile/tread and pressure(even 1/2lb) matter in tuning. More coming all the time.
    If you want another bike for your terrain a Spark or a Top Fuel are a couple.

  4. #4
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    I had one of the first Ripleys off the production line and rode it in various guises until I got my Following about a year ago. The Ripley served me well when setup as a marathon bike (my original intention) and did OK as a trail/enduro bike (even with -1 headset). Only when I test rode a mates Following did I realise what I was missing. The Following is so much fun on the faster chunkier terrain but can hold it's own against other bikes like the Ripley on longer climbs and tarmac commutes.

    However the more I rode the Following the more burly I set it up, to the point I grew tired of pedalling the 2.5DHF and slack angles the 15km to the trailhead. So when I got the chance to buy another Ripley frame (XL instead of L this time) I jumped at it and set it up with skinny XC rubber (& same -1 headset), just the ticket for longer days with lots more distance to cover.

    So in summary, there is quite a bit of overlap with the frames, however they can be made into very different bikes with different setups. You'll have to decide if having two damn fine bikes in your garage is overkill, it's not for me :-)

  5. #5
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    Thanks so much for that reply alixta. That is actually how I intended to setup my bikes. I currently have an Enve XC with Chris King hubs carbon wheelset with my Ripley with 19mm internal rims. I am running 2.1 Maxxis Ignitor rubber on the Ripley. I was going to get larger rims on the Following and run 2.4 front and 2.3 rear on the Following. Might just end up with the perfect FS 29er quiver once I add the Following. Thanks again.

  6. #6
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    Sounds like a solid plan. Keep the Ripley light & fast. I was able to go back to 160 disks & 750 flat bar as well. All these things add up (or don't) to really mate a difference to the character of the ride.

  7. #7
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    I ride in SE Mi using a Trek carbon hardtail. For the past three seasons I've used 30mm inner width carbon rims with Bontrager XR Team tires. The sidewall support from the wide rims is a major performance factor for me. The added volume increases compliance and allows lower pressure for a bigger contact patch. The contact patch makes lower height smaller more numerous knob tires work for the terrain in MI where I ride as well as Phoenix area terrain I've used the bike on. I use a Sapim Laser spoke to counter some of the stiffness of the carbon rims I build with using Dt 350 hubs. Carbon rims practically build themselves because the stiffness makes them very easy to dish and true. For my next frame build I want more rear tire clearance from a carbon frame with Boost hub spacing. And a 110 Boost fork. Because of tire compliance I'm able to stay hardtail.
    I suggest you could get a reasonably different range of performance by adding a wide rim wheelset to your Ripley. Rims from EIE, Dt 350 hubs and Sapim Laser spokes with brass nipples from Dans Comp would get you something to experiment with for around $600-$650. Plus $80 or so for the 36t star ratchet upgrade. You can figure out the CK cost. XR2 Team 2.35 Bontragers for tires. They would allow ~16 psi front and 4-5 more for a rear.

  8. #8
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    I had the OG Ripley. Used a bunch of the parts for my Following build and would never go back! The Following is a WAY better technical climber and better descender. Maybe lost a tiny bit of acceleration quickness and flat pedal efficiency, but everything else is SOOOOO much better.

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