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Thread: Starting out

  1. #1
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    Starting out

    I just got into riding a couple of years ago and have had big box store bikes that I have ridden into the ground. As ride more i'm getting more and more into the sport and next year I would like to try a race or two possibly. I will be making my 1st real bike purchase and looking for some recommendations on bikes or what type of bike i should be looking at. Where I am lacking is, for this type of riding, should i be looking at bikes that have a head angle of 66 degrees, 70 or somewhere in the middle. Same for front travel 100mm, 120, one of the races i was looking at was ADK 80K 2016 but i'm not sure of this would even be considered and enduro race. Just basically dipped my toe in the water and looking for some guidance and to be set in the right direction. Thanks for the help!!!

  2. #2
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    Mountain bike course is "over four 20k loops on and between the trails used for the 1980 Winter Olympics. The course is 100% off-road, about a 50/50 mix of single-track and double-track (cross-country ski trails) with just over 1000 feet of climbing per lap"

    Categories include cyclocross bikes too, which indicates that they're probably will not be a whole lot of technical. My recommendation is a 100-120mm travel fork, a 68HT angle, and 29er, or comparable 27+ bike.

    Best bet is to ask around local riders though. they'll tell you what works and what doesn't. Find some local weekly trail rides, show up with your current bike, and ride with them.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

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    I'm actually going to be in that area this weekend, friend is doing an iron man, and was planning to stopping by some LBS.

    Would things change a little if they go more technical?


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    Not by much. Even if it does get more technical, a cyclocross bike will still need to be able to get over it. If a cyclocross bike can do it, a mountain bike can do it. If that means carrying your bike for a few feet, so be it.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  5. #5
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    That's an endurance race. Basically the same as XC but longer.

    Enduro refers to a format borrowed from motorcycle racing in which riders alternate transfer stages and timed stages. As long as they finish by the cutoff, usually fairly generous relative to the level of rider, their time for the event is the sum of their times for all the timed stages. In mountain bike Enduro, the timed stages are typically downhill or at least trend down. So people like a pretty burly bike.

    I think an actual XC bike is still the best option for XC and higher-level endurance. But trail bikes are getting to be a lot of fun lately, and give up less and less to full-on XC bikes. So you need to give a little thought to whether you want to go to some of these events because they're fun and have a good atmosphere if you think you'll be about racing. Personally, I'm with BSNYC - I think it was nice to ride for a while just to ride before I got into racing and now that it's not a good time for me to race, I'm only having a little trouble going back to just riding to ride. So that would have me suggesting more along the lines of a 120 mm 29er for you, if it's not too big. I'd be a bad fanboy if I didn't mention the Kona Hei Hei. And the first FS I liked was the Specialized Camber. I was also really impressed by a Yeti ARC the other day.

    I wasn't riding much when I was on the East Coast, but from what I remember, I'd suggest full suspension if it doesn't hurt the spec too much to get it in your budget and you'll typically be riding on the mainland.

    As riding gets more technical, you don't ride cyclocross bike, cyclocross bike ride you. But as long as climbing speed is part of someone's overall time, steepish, short-travel mountain bikes stay dominant.

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    Cool, thank you very much for the help, i was looking to have at least the 120mm of travel, but was leaning more towards 27.5 because i do like things more technical then slight curves and flat trails. I'm not looking for down hill but so climbs and descends, twist and turns with banks (not sure of the actual terms), rocks, roots. I was also leaning more towards a head angle of 68 degress. I guess the race i mentioned earlier is not really what am looking for but still maybe fun to try.

  7. #7
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    LOL, I think usually when it comes to it, people don't really want to build their riding practice around racing. Which is fine. While I'm bummed XC isn't doing that well in my region, mostly I just want people to get on the right bike and have fun.

    This year, I'm doing most of my riding on a Kona Process 134. I think that class of bike really kicks ass lately. It's really fun to descend on and it's more forgiving than my XC bike if I don't line up a jump or drop perfectly. It also has a higher speed limit and pumps really well, so flow lines are way more fun. It doesn't climb like a XC bike but I still enjoy trail climbs on it and climb with about the same peer group. Some competitors include the Trek Remedy and Fuel EX, Specialized Stumpjumper and Camber, and this year, the Kona Hei Hei Trail. They all have a little different emphasis and, of course, different dealer networks.

    And you could try Enduro on any of them. Though I think competitive guys have moved on to more like a 160 mm bike for that. The one I demoed wasn't as encouraging of tomfoolery as I wanted.

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