Resin pads, anyone using them for racing/race-like conditions?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Resin pads, anyone using them for racing/race-like conditions?

    Just picked up a more XC-ish bike, with XT brakes just like my Pivot M6, and after burning the pads in riding around the block, they blew me away with the power and feel as soon as I hit the trails.

    Well, almost the same, the new bike has an XTR-level Freeza rotor vs. XT "normal" ICE-tech brakes on my Pivot, which shouldn't make a noticeable difference...oh, and it has resin pads.

    Everybody says that resins should (and they probably do) fade earlier than sintered pads, but in the age of high(er) tech rotors and finned pads, do pads get that hot anymore?

    I don't care about wear, resin pads are cheaper, and they feel so much better than the finned sintered pads that I'd gladly pay a little more over time because they wear out quicker.

    What does the MTBR collective have to say about their experiences?

  2. #2
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    I often change to resin pads if the grip levels are low, particularly if I am running XC tires. Resins are quite a bit less grabby then a metallic pads. If it is wet I take the resins off, they can have rather limited lifespan (like less than a ride in some nasty conditions).

    If you are switching bikes you might find it difficult to adjust from metallic to resin. Right now I have resin pads on my XC bike and that is the hardest thing to adjust too; long stem, steep angles, no dropper no problems, but different braking characteristics now that is hard.
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  3. #3
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    I ride resin pads (aluminum backing) with(out)-edit. the finned rotors. It's the most fade resistant set up I've ever run. Part of it may be that they sluff off material more, carrying heat away.

    I prefer the resin pads, better feel, more fade resistant, and as a bonus, they're lighter.

    The only reason I can see to run Sintered is for longevity, or maybe absolute power, especially in the wet.
    Last edited by brentos; 11-19-2015 at 06:48 PM.

  4. #4
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    As Brent alluded, it depends on your conditions.

    Richde, you're in/near Vegas, right? I'd imagine that you'd be fine with a set of resin pads there, as it's pretty damn dry.

    In VA, I've chewed through a set of week old resin pads over the course of a 2hr XC race, in the rain. Done. Dead. Down to the backing.

    As such, I use resin when I'm out west. More fade resistant for longer, faster descending.

    During the school year, in western VA, where there's a good chance I'll cross multiple creeks during a race, get rained or snowed on, the descents aren't as long, have a lot more trees, and a lot more turns, I use sintered pads.
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  5. #5
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    I'm still torn about switching to resin for my enduro bike, but have 490 miles on my Stache with resins and there's still plenty of material left. The lack of initial bite when switching from the resin to sintered padded bike takes a little getting used to and usually causes a micro-"uh oh" moment until the sintered pads start to really work.

    The brakes on the Stache sees varied usage with either lots of brake dragging while leading mtb tours or pretty hard usage as I'm using and abusing it's ability to build and maintain speed. I did manage to glaze part of one pad, which showed up as a dark ring around the front brake rotor, but they aren't the finned pads either. Sanded the pad a little and see no reason why they couldn't make 1,000 miles, at least on the front.

    Just sent the fork on my enduro bike in to Fox for a rebuild, bought a new rear shock (old one had a little damage to the air shaft), but for some reason I don't want to spend $30-40 on a set of brake pads. The Super-D season starts in a month, so hardcore practice on the trails will begin as soon as my fork is back...with a new set of finned resin pads, despite the massive cost.

  6. #6
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    Ever thought about running one sintered, one resin per brake?

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Ever thought about running one sintered, one resin per brake?

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    You're still dealing with the same problem, either resins will hold up to the heat generated or they won't.

    Now that I've thought about it, I need to swap out the front resin pads out for the finned version and keep the old ones to use on the rear. Otherwise, I'll just end up glazing the pads again.

  8. #8
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    I cannot run resin pads. The fade is horrible with them when the speeds pick up or the descents get long. The bigger problem is that they are not a problem..... until they are and it's too late.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    I cannot run resin pads. The fade is horrible with them when the speeds pick up or the descents get long. The bigger problem is that they are not a problem..... until they are and it's too late.
    Weird, my experience with aluminum backed resin pads (no fins) has been the exact opposite vs. the sintered pads with the fins. The resin pads were far better.

    The Resin pads with a Titanium backing plate were a disaster when it came to fade though. I also run the rotors with cooling fins which may change things.

    (I'm not doubting your experience, just stating that mine is much different).

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