Bunny Hopping Constantly on Enduro DH sections?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    42

    Bunny Hopping Constantly on Enduro DH sections?

    So this might belong in the beginner section, but considering that it's enduro specific I figured I'd post it here.

    Whenever I'm watching the chest cam videos of an enduro rider, and especially if it's a good one, it seems to me that they're constantly doing bunny hops.. But I don't know for sure because I can't see the wheels that well. I'm seeing the row motion of the American bunny hop where it looks like they're constantly bringing the bike handles up from below them to in front of them. And it sounds like the wheels are leaving the ground.

    Question is this:
    Am I actually seeing bunny hops or is it something else? Are the riders just going over terrain that I can't see because of stupid fishbowl lenses?
    Or is intentionally bunny hopping all the time something they do on purpose to reduce friction?
    Or are they going so fast over slopes so steep that even though they aren't intentionally jumping, they're just getting airborn anyway?

    I'll try to post some vids when I get home. But for now my question is this: what place do bunny hops have in enduro racing?

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    Probably pumping small table tops and doubles or manualing off drops.

    Sent from my E5803 using Tapatalk
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mfa81's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,118
    that would be my guess too... pumping every single small feature to get that fraction of time out of it...

    looking at the ews video on pinkbike from this week's race I don't quite see this all the time though

  4. #4
    beater
    Reputation: evasive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,634
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Probably pumping small table tops and doubles or manualing off drops.

    Sent from my E5803 using Tapatalk
    Probably this, although I'd guess that you're seeing skilled riders find natural features that work the same way. There are plenty of talented riders who could bunny hop their way down an entire trail, but they're unlikely to win a race that way.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    42
    when pumping do the wheels ever leave the ground? They don't, right? Cause if so I'm doing it wrong...

  6. #6
    Trail Ninja
    Reputation: Varaxis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    5,384
    Wheels don't need to leave the ground. The pump is effective as long as the wheel is very light on the upsloping side, and heavy on the downslope/backside. With minimal movement, you can essentially just find a centered position and let the bike rock/pitch/flow with the contours terrain by itself and simply focus on riding/weighting the backside. Save energy, yet get extra speed.

    Bunnyhopping typically takes a lot of energy to do. Maybe they are merely trying to style it out, or aren't going fast enough to float in that centered position, considering the amplitude of the bumps/dips in the trails. A racer would do better conserving energy to strategically find ways to cut time where there is much potential. I imagine to a racer aiming to win against other top class racers, a bunnyhop is an exaggerated technique with a lot of wasteful movement in most cases.
    "The challenge is not in developing new ideas, but in escaping old ideas."

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    42
    Thank you for all of the replies guys. I think that what I'm seeing is pumps and that it just sounds like the wheels are leaving the ground because the front shock isn't compressing over anything.

    Followup question though based on some more research I was doing...

    Let's say you have a small jump on the track. Not a roller but let's just say it's a bump that you can treat as a jump but that wasn't intentionally designed that way. Would it be a good idea to do a little bunny hop before the jump and then nose in to the back of the jump (I'm sure there's a word for it) so that you can boost off of the decline? Or would you just want to hit the jump and try to stifle it as much as possible? Or just try to boost up into the jump?

    I'm sure the answer also depends on what terrain comes up after the jump, but in this case let's just say that it's a flat straight away that's non-technical.

    This stuff is really fun to think about... wish I was riding and testing stuff out and not stuck at work lol.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bunny Hopping Constantly on Enduro DH sections?-boostquestion.jpg  

    Last edited by dave785; 07-21-2016 at 01:02 PM. Reason: uploaded pic

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: coke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,563
    Quote Originally Posted by dave785 View Post
    Thank you for all of the replies guys. I think that what I'm seeing is pumps and that it just sounds like the wheels are leaving the ground because the front shock isn't compressing over anything.

    Followup question though based on some more research I was doing...

    Let's say you have a small jump on the track. Not a roller but let's just say it's a bump that you can treat as a jump but that wasn't intentionally designed that way. Would it be a good idea to do a little bunny hop before the jump and then nose in to the back of the jump (I'm sure there's a word for it) so that you can boost off of the decline? Or would you just want to hit the jump and try to stifle it as much as possible? Or just try to boost up into the jump?

    I'm sure the answer also depends on what terrain comes up after the jump, but in this case let's just say that it's a flat straight away that's non-technical.

    This stuff is really fun to think about... wish I was riding and testing stuff out and not stuck at work lol.
    Another option is to try to just soak it up if it's not too big. When you're coming up the face, bend your legs and arms and allow the bike to come up in to you. The core of your body won't really move. Once you're past the top of the jump, extend your legs and arms to weight the bike and pump the back side.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    585
    Pumping can also help on uphills. There's a video floating around of a cyclo cross rider who seems to gain speed riding up Belgian stairs. He just does a little hop at every stair (at high speed!) and seems to defy physics.

    Personally if I'm on a technical climb with a bunch of big rocks really close I tend to push down right before the front wheel hits the rock to pump over them and hopefully drag the back wheel along. Downhill I tend to steamroll everything but a more skilled rider can probably apply this as well.

    Anyway if you see something interesting that the pros are doing give it a shot!

  10. #10
    Formerly of Kent
    Reputation: Le Duke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    11,364
    Cody Kaiser on the stairs:

    https://youtu.be/o0oGMix5X44

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    Death from Below.

  11. #11
    Trail Ninja
    Reputation: Varaxis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    5,384
    Quote Originally Posted by dave785 View Post
    Thank you for all of the replies guys. I think that what I'm seeing is pumps and that it just sounds like the wheels are leaving the ground because the front shock isn't compressing over anything.

    Followup question though based on some more research I was doing...

    Let's say you have a small jump on the track. Not a roller but let's just say it's a bump that you can treat as a jump but that wasn't intentionally designed that way. Would it be a good idea to do a little bunny hop before the jump and then nose in to the back of the jump (I'm sure there's a word for it) so that you can boost off of the decline? Or would you just want to hit the jump and try to stifle it as much as possible? Or just try to boost up into the jump?

    I'm sure the answer also depends on what terrain comes up after the jump, but in this case let's just say that it's a flat straight away that's non-technical.

    This stuff is really fun to think about... wish I was riding and testing stuff out and not stuck at work lol.
    In your illustration:
    - blue line is pre-jumping
    - grey/green line is scrubbing
    - red line is boosting

    It even applies to sharp drop offs, such as "Peaty's Plunge", where it's ideal to pre-jump it to manage to land on a downsloping transition, as going too fast might just lead to casing the drop.
    - Example of why casing a huck and landing flat is bad, and why peaty's plunge tends to be pre-jumped: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cLZ6v3R8XQ0
    - Why it's named such: https://youtu.be/OSrcz7hayoE?t=42

    Example of what a pre-jump can do compared to what others seem to think is the more intuitive approach:
    - Case-o-Rama at Sea Otter DH - Mountain Biking Videos - Vital MTB

    The decision all depends on the details of the situation. The more in-depth you look into it, the more strategic it all seems.
    "The challenge is not in developing new ideas, but in escaping old ideas."

  12. #12
    LMN
    LMN is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,028
    What you might also be observing is people floating over the rough spots on the trail. A good rider can make a rough trail smooth by loading the bike in the smooth sections and unloading it for the rough sections.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  13. #13
    Captain One Lung Administrator
    Reputation: JCWages's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    4,909
    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    What you might also be observing is people floating over the rough spots on the trail. A good rider can make a rough trail smooth by loading the bike in the smooth sections and unloading it for the rough sections.
    I see a lot of that on EWS and GRT series races. It's faster.

  14. #14
    RTM
    RTM is offline
    #1 Latex Salesman
    Reputation: RTM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,846
    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    What you might also be observing is people floating over the rough spots on the trail. A good rider can make a rough trail smooth by loading the bike in the smooth sections and unloading it for the rough sections.
    good call. this is what they're doing the majority of the time. camera completely smooths out what you're seeing so it may not look necessary.
    Last edited by RTM; 08-11-2016 at 08:22 AM.

  15. #15
    Just a flesh wound
    Reputation: Prophet Julio's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,343
    In Enduro Racing, it's called "launching it", not bunny hopping.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Ripmo now.

Similar Threads

  1. Bunny Hopping
    By Wingspan1503 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 01-06-2014, 10:24 AM
  2. Bunny Hopping
    By Dung Hopper in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-24-2013, 06:37 PM
  3. Need help manualing and bunny-hopping
    By TheBigV in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 05-31-2013, 02:41 PM
  4. Extremely frustrated with bunny hopping
    By Muffinhead in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 10-06-2012, 12:37 PM
  5. Help: Bunny hopping with clipless?
    By Muffinhead in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-26-2012, 01:10 PM

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.