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  1. #1
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    xcm bike question

    Question for you endurance folks. Ive been away from the sport for 6 years (started in 94) and with decided to jump back in this spring (more like my 13 year old son wanted to jump into the sport). I picked up a 2019 Giant Trance pro (green one) from a local bike shop, and 2000 K later Im starting to get the legs back, and dropping the 6 year hibernation weight. It was very weird at the start, new geo and a front wheel with a mind of its own on steep climbs, but under control now.

    Rides - usually around 30 k and about 130-150 per week, mix of road, double track and rocky trails (rocky climbs, some rocks on single track, up and over them as well) The rocky part is a smaller part of the rides, I like to incorporate them to keep the skill component going. 5k out of 30k.

    The bike is not bad, got a deal on xmc wheels which made a huge difference, pedaling efficiency could be a bit better. Looking at doing 4 events next year.

    Question - I know people are looking at going xc to DC, Im wondering if I should add a used xc or swap the Trance for an xc. The xc bikes are coming in with 67/68 degrees now. Cheers
    Last edited by Northofus; 10-12-2020 at 09:17 AM.

  2. #2
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    What do you mean about the pedal efficiency? The maestro system is one of the best in terms of efficiency.
    It's really personal. I have a 100mm 22 pound FS xc bike but I never do any riding that needs more than that. If all you ride is xc type stuff, then it might be worth it. If you like to dabble in enduro or the like, maybe not.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northofus View Post
    Question for you endurance folks. Ive been away from the sport for 6 years (started in 94) and with decided to jump back in this spring (more like my 13 year old son wanted to jump into the sport). I picked up a 2019 Giant Trance pro (green one) from a local bike shop, and 2000 K later Im starting to get the legs back, and dropping the 6 year hibernation weight. It was very weird at the start, new geo and a front wheel with a mind of its own on steep climbs, but under control now.

    Rides - usually around 30 k and about 130-150 per week, mix of road, double track and rocky trails (rocky climbs, some rocks on single track, up and over them as well) The rocky part is a smaller part of the rides, I like to incorporate them to keep the skill component going. 5k out of 30k.

    The bike is not bad, got a deal on xmc wheels which made a huge difference, pedaling efficiency could be a bit better. Looking at doing 4 events next year.

    Question - I know people are looking at going xc to DC, Im wondering if I should add a used xc or swap the Trance for an xc. The xc bikes are coming in with 67/68 degrees now. Cheers
    What is "DC"? dual-country? I can't even tell what you are asking.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    What is "DC"? dual-country? I can't even tell what you are asking.
    Down Country. Downhill/XC kind of thing.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny7 View Post
    Down Country. Downhill/XC kind of thing.
    So...trail riding?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1 View Post
    So...trail riding?
    AKA...cross country?


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  7. #7
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    Jesus christ
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  8. #8
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    In general, the fittest riders do the best on XC rigs, they are the fastest. I'm talking 100-mile type races (endurance stuff). The further you get away from the "fittest riders", the more cush you'll probably need to maintain composure over 100 miles, but that doesn't mean you want to go crazy and be lugging around a bunch of extra weight or travel that will also add up over the miles. Real simple stuff like slightly bigger tires or a slightly longer fork goes a long way IME. I also like having a bit more durability as I get sloppy over the miles, this is more about the tires and wheels though. The Trance WAS an XC back way back when, but it evolved to be their trail to even AM bike and is pretty far removed from that now. I love riding DH, tech, big air, etc., but for XC events, I want to be on an XC bike. If you want to call a 120mm front fork "down country" or whatever, then fine. Now, the further removed you are from the front-runners, the less the bike is going to matter to a degree, as in a 4 or 5" bike really isn't going to affect your time and you are going to see more of a hodge-podge of different types of bikes being ridden, but again, 100 miles is a long way to go on a bike and you want to make sure that it's going to help you go that distance, rather than keep you from doing it.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    In general, the fittest riders do the best on XC rigs, they are the fastest. I'm talking 100-mile type races (endurance stuff). The further you get away from the "fittest riders", the more cush you'll probably need to maintain composure over 100 miles,
    Agree for the most part, but if I'm "fit" or "unfit" the last thing I want to do on a 60-100 mile ride is carry extra weight. And in terms of "cush", in any marathon race, I don't recall ever bottoming out my 100mm front or rear. I realize that with more travel you have more to play with in terms of feel and pressures. However, I think an xc bike gives you all the comfort you need on MOST tracks.
    Short answer, if you have the money, go for it. If not, like Jayem said, it's probably not gonna make or break you coming in 1st or 2nd. Or in my case, 25th.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny7 View Post
    Agree for the most part, but if I'm "fit" or "unfit" the last thing I want to do on a 60-100 mile ride is carry extra weight. And in terms of "cush", in any marathon race, I don't recall ever bottoming out my 100mm front or rear. I realize that with more travel you have more to play with in terms of feel and pressures. However, I think an xc bike gives you all the comfort you need on MOST tracks.
    Short answer, if you have the money, go for it. If not, like Jayem said, it's probably not gonna make or break you coming in 1st or 2nd. Or in my case, 25th.
    I was trying to say that yes, I do make tweaks for the endurance races vs. short XC races. Using my 120mm fork isn't so much about travel, more about the better chassis rigidity with bigger stanchions, because again, at mile 80 you get pretty tired and need a bit more forgiveness to help with errors IME. Same with the tire casing, I'm not wanting to lug around heavy tires, but some of the XC race casings can be russian roulette as far as the terrain is concerned. The last thing I want to do is fix a flat at mile 80 as well. I would say that I run my suspension a little softer during the endurance stuff, but that doesn't mean I need "more travel" either.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  11. #11
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    Unless your target is purc XC, I'd shop for a light 115 to 120 rig, like the Top Fuel and countless others.

    But, be careful. There are plenty of new 120 rigs that are trying to be "bigger" than they are. Heavier, plusher, etc., and I kind of don't understand that focus. Others might.

    For 100s, over the whole day, I was always fastest on 120 bikes, though the old Turner Czar was a very close second.
    Whining is not a strategy.

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    Ive done some reading in the Giant thread and a couple others. Some owners that own both a cross country and a trance(like) bike have some pretty good insight. Hopefully COVID is behind us in the spring, or to the point where I can do some test rides of 100 mm bikes for a direct comparison.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northofus View Post
    Question for you endurance folks. Ive been away from the sport for 6 years (started in 94) and with decided to jump back in this spring (more like my 13 year old son wanted to jump into the sport). I picked up a 2019 Giant Trance pro (green one) from a local bike shop, and 2000 K later Im starting to get the legs back, and dropping the 6 year hibernation weight. It was very weird at the start, new geo and a front wheel with a mind of its own on steep climbs, but under control now.

    Rides - usually around 30 k and about 130-150 per week, mix of road, double track and rocky trails (rocky climbs, some rocks on single track, up and over them as well) The rocky part is a smaller part of the rides, I like to incorporate them to keep the skill component going. 5k out of 30k.

    The bike is not bad, got a deal on xmc wheels which made a huge difference, pedaling efficiency could be a bit better. Looking at doing 4 events next year.

    Question - I know people are looking at going xc to DC, Im wondering if I should add a used xc or swap the Trance for an xc. The xc bikes are coming in with 67/68 degrees now. Cheers
    If you do end up choosing a new bike, I ride my Scott Spark that has 100mm front and back on the same trails I use to only ride my older "all mountain" bike that had 150/140mm and the same headtube angle. With the newer geometry and suspension that these newer bikes have, it's amazing what you can go over. Plus their lockout system is better than I expected and I use it much than I thought I would.
    As I train for more distance, using an XC bike is the only way for me to gain the efficiency I need.

  14. #14
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    There was a 2018? Anthem that had 27.5 wheels and 120mm rear and 130mm front travel.
    Sounds perfect if you can find one.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    Unless your target is purc XC, I'd shop for a light 115 to 120 rig, like the Top Fuel and countless others.

    But, be careful. There are plenty of new 120 rigs that are trying to be "bigger" than they are. Heavier, plusher, etc., and I kind of don't understand that focus. Others might.

    For 100s, over the whole day, I was always fastest on 120 bikes, though the old Turner Czar was a very close second.
    He could just buy a 120 Sid ultimate for the front for XCM race season.

    If you arenít on the podium, I would just race what he has, lighten it up a little bit with thoughtful carbon parts.


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