Whoís had a bike fit?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Whoís had a bike fit?

    Iím going to be doing some longer rides/racers, and in training for these Iím starting to find my shoulders, wrists and the palm of my hands (feels like nerve pain I think from too much pressure) are getting quit sore. Iím thinking a bike fit may be the way to go, and the only option where I live is a BG bike fit which Iíve had before on road bikes.

    Iím curious how many others have had bike fits on their mountain bikes as given the terrain we ride over and that we are less static than a road bike position, I havenít really considered it before. Also, with technical handling being more important on a mtb, putting in a longer stem to get the right fit (if necessary) may have negative results handling wise could it not, just as an example?

    Is a bike fit (which isnít cheap) a good option for a mtb?

  2. #2
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    Only if it's mtb centric. Sounds like some core work could afford you some more support, easing the pressure on the hands and wrists. It's counter intuitive but try lowering your bars to further engage the core instead of weight on the hands.
    "These things are very fancy commuter bikes or really bad dirt bikes, but they are not mountain bikes." - J. Mac

  3. #3
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    I've had 2. They really didn't seem worth it to me.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  4. #4
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    Had a bike fit before my first 100 miler. Probably would not have made it 50 miles without it.

    To be honest, I really had no clue about fitting a bike before. Short stem, wide bars...wanted to be a free-rider.

  5. #5
    Grip it and rip it.
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    It's counter intuitive but try lowering your bars to further engage the core instead of weight on the hands.
    I don't really agree with this as it really depends on a few other factors. We don't know what height your bars are at the moment to start with. Also, the height your bars feel comfortable at is also linked to your flexibility. Low bars if the saddle height isn't right can put great discomfort on the crotch area, from experience . Every body shape is different. However - good core strength is for sure something that helps.

    I'd recommend a bike fit for mtb, definitely. Apart from comfort, the saddle height being off by a tiny amount can mean that you won't be getting as much power to the pedals as you could be. A good quality fitter is important. If you have been to that fitters before and they are happy to do mtb, then go for it. If they have never done a mtb fit then maybe talk to them about it. A long stem would change the handling on descents, but if your bike is that short for you then you probably have to think about a larger bike for next year.

    The ergon grips have helped me get rip of wrist pain, but the bike fit was the best call I made. Why bother putting in all those training hours and sacrificing if you're not giving yourself the best chance?

  6. #6
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    I've had one done. Ended up being very helpful. I had my saddle way too low, and learned that I do better without a slammed stem.

  7. #7
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    I have been fitted on two mountain bikes, a cyclocross bike and a road bike in the past 2 years. Each time I went with the same fitter that uses the 3D motion capture Retul system. The fitting checks everything including the cleats and shoe fit. I had knee surgery from a moto accident and having the cleats adjusted properly makes sure I don't have any knee pain. When I fit myself I always have knee pain.

  8. #8
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    Never had a ďprofessional Ē bike fit, but my brother whoís worked at bike shops and raced/ridden for 20 yrs did give me a fit. He did some minor saddle and cleat adjustments, but I didnít notice a difference. Maybe I was more efficient but couldnít tell.

    Regarding hands, ESI Extra Chunky grips have been a lifesaver for me. I had palm issues in the early season and those grips got rid of it. I would also look into your bars if your running mostly a flat bar. Maybe you need more rise or back sweep.

    The long, but inexpensive method, is to make 1 adjustment to you cockpit at a time (ie: raise stem) then go ride for a week and see if you notice improvements. Then reset and adjust something else. Over weeks you should be able to start narrowing things down.
    2018 Scott Spark RC 900 World Cup | ďIf youíre not first youíre lastĒ

  9. #9
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    Sometimes it boils down to the fact that our bodies are not intended to ride a bike for hours on end and I think genetics play roll. Drastic things like knee pain might be helped by a fit but sometimes numb hands and feet, at least in my case, can't be helped.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  10. #10
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    I got good results from my first ever MTB fit a couple years ago. I'd been riding for 25+ years and thought I had a good position to start with, but occasionally had some low back and hand pain during long races. My fitter basically flipped my stem from +6 to -6 degrees, raised my saddle a couple mm, and slid the saddle back a couple mm. Some of those changes were counter-intuitive to me and not things I would have tired on my own, but the resulting position worked really well for me. So, I definitely felt like it was worth the expense.

  11. #11
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    I got a fit for my road bike a few weeks back. I had no "issues", but got a new bike and wanted to get fit right. Only major change was increase in seat height to get better leg extension and better power. Also moved the seat back a bit. I liked the results and then felt really low on my mtn bikes. So I slowly moved the seat up on mtn bikes to better match the leg extension I got on the road bike. I was careful to not make it identical since I need more room to move on mtn bikes, but overall it was a benefit. I might get a proper mtn bike fit too, but since I feel comfortable I have not done it.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

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