Training Question- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 35 of 35
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    388

    Training Question

    I'll try to keep this concise...

    I'm doing the Tahoe 100k race this summer. I have a good background in cycling, and have done a lot of longer running events (nothing over a marathon). I do Olympic Triathlon. All this to indicate I'm in decent shape, and feel like I have a good base knowledge for training.

    My training plan (I don't have a coach, I kind of put this together from various sources) calls for 2 longer endurance workouts per week (like 2 hours, zone 3, 3 hours zone 2). This all makes sense from my other training background knowledge.

    I live in Norcal, everything here has hills. Average is close to 1k climbing per 10 miles. I had planned to do a longer MTB on the weekend, followed by a road ride for my endurance workouts. My local trails make staying at the low HR nearly impossible. My last 2 hour MTB had me at an average HR of 150 (Z3), BUT I spent 25% in Z5, 37% in Z4, 31% in Z1, and only 7% in Z2-3.

    Here is my question. Am I wasting time training on the MTB for my endurance workouts, or should I be doing all endurance workouts on the road or a trainer?
    2017 Scott Spark 930
    2016 Fuji Grand Fondo Classico 1.3
    2017 Marin Nicasio gravel bike

  2. #2
    Vincit qui patitur
    Reputation: owtdorz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    744
    IMO From what I understand is road workouts are not good enough for training for an MTB race. Stick with some steeper and rocky climbs and some good rough trails to prep you for what's to come.
    Vincit qui patitur
    2014 KONA Process 153
    2016 KONA Operator
    2017 Salsa Powderkeg
    2018 Santa Cruz Tallboy 29 C R

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,158
    In my experience, road riding has several advantages over offroad. It is easier for me to maintain the desired level of effort on the road because trails get me excited and I cannot control the urge to smash it. Because of this and due to less standing and upper body involvement, I recover faster and can train more frequently. On the other hand, the principals of specificity say that a good portion of your training needs to match the event you are training for.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    388
    LOL, these two responses are perfect and exactly where my confusion is coming from. I do agree that road riding is much easier to do at a set pace / effort. I also agree that you need the MTB riding to get ready for the event. Hills are amazing, they just make you strong! I'm interested to see what others have to say...

    For now (unless someone who is a training guru can direct me otherwise) I think I'm going to keep my "shorter" long workout to MTB and try to ride at a pace that would mimic my anticipated race to "finish" pace. Then I'll do the "longer" long workout on road and try to keep it closer to zone 2.
    2017 Scott Spark 930
    2016 Fuji Grand Fondo Classico 1.3
    2017 Marin Nicasio gravel bike

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    861
    For fitness -> road riding or trainer
    For skills -> MTB

    You need to also do some longer MTB rides to combine both skills and fitness.

    Where in NorCal are you? I can prob recommend some good mixed routes that would be good prep

    (I've done the Tahoe 100k multiple times and do it pretty much every year)

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    388
    Quote Originally Posted by Udyr View Post
    For fitness -> road riding or trainer
    For skills -> MTB

    You need to also do some longer MTB rides to combine both skills and fitness.

    Where in NorCal are you? I can prob recommend some good mixed routes that would be good prep

    (I've done the Tahoe 100k multiple times and do it pretty much every year)
    That would be great! I'm in Auburn. I will be riding Auburn a lot, and Cronan Ranch / SFART / Salmon Falls for longer rides. Also, plan to do some riding on the gravel bike at higher elevation as Spring gets closer (and roads open up).

    Also, I'm doing shorter rides during the week (45 minute recovery rides, because that's what I have time for during lunch) and I get in one session of intervals (either on the trainer or on the bike trail along the American River on the road bike). I'm doing the Tahoe City XTERRA triathlon in June, so I have to squeeze in swimming and a little running as well. About tapped for time, so the 100k will be what it will be. I'm looking forward to it though!
    2017 Scott Spark 930
    2016 Fuji Grand Fondo Classico 1.3
    2017 Marin Nicasio gravel bike

  7. #7
    Location: 10 ft from Hell Moderator
    Reputation: life behind bars's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    4,163
    Targeted workouts, road bike or trainer.
    "These things are very fancy commuter bikes or really bad dirt bikes, but they are not mountain bikes." - J. Mac

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    482
    I have found that nothing builds fitness and power like very specific and structured training on a trainer (I am a fan of trainer road for this). However I have also found that the fitness and power that is built on the trainer (or road, which IMO is not as efficient as the trainer) does not perfectly translate over to off road riding. So what I recommend and do myself is build fitness and power on the trainer during the winter / off season and then bring that over to the off road by incorporating off road rides toward the end of the "training season". It kinda brakes down like this:

    -off season training up to 1 month out of race season: 100% trainer
    -last month of training season: 60% off road, 40% trainer
    -race season: 80% off road both racing and training mixed, 20% trainer but very specific work like V02 max or similar high intensity work that is hard or almost impossible to do not on a trainer
    *this is approximate percentages just to illustrate the concept behind how I use both for my training.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    6,688
    You're targeting ONE big race which is exactly what I used to do. I found that course-specific training made the most sense. Shoot, for the last two months before my target race, I'd even do most of my road training on an mtb with slicks.

    I never bothered with the Z stuff. Just did long training rides at my "all day dog trot" pace, up to two-thirds as long as I figured the race would take (so typically 6 hour rides). A great way to cover all the bases is to do a three hour road ride followed by a 3 hour mtb ride.

    Good luck. Have fun!
    Whining is not a strategy.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,914
    Quote Originally Posted by Udyr View Post
    For fitness -> road riding or trainer
    For skills -> MTB

    You need to also do some longer MTB rides to combine both skills and fitness.
    Yes

    And to add to that, I used strictly MTB but integrated road into my workout and the payoff was tremendous, as least for me.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,013
    do you lack mtb skills? spend more time off road.

    can you get rad but you're kind of slow? more road bike.

    road biking is better for gaining fitness but if you crash in your race and hurt yourself what good is that fitness?

  12. #12
    I am Walt
    Reputation: waltaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,480
    I just ride more when I have big events coming up (8-12-24 hour solo). I don't (won't) road ride, and am in AZ, so no "offseason" (ride MTB year round). Just ride all my local trails, and the system out my back door, alot. Maybe do more "base" (for me) "dirt roadie" miles on some easier local trails.

    My general plan - Moderate ride (15-25 miles) nid-week (Weds or Thurs), a really long ride on Sat (3-6 hours), and a easy/moderate "active recovery" ride on Sun (1-2 hours). Maybe a random extra ride or run, depending on the week. I also lift (hard) in the gym 3x per week, so don't do cardio on those days.
    Ride more; post less...

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    861
    I'm less familiar with the Auburn area (that's really the only area in NorCal I haven't ridden) but for reference, this was my usual Tahoe/Leadville weekend "big" training ride

    https://www.strava.com/activities/973996767

    It's a mixture of road, fireroad and a bit of single track and I would ride it on my hardtail with low profile XC tires.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    388
    All great stuff here. Thanks for the input! I'll probably sort of stick with what I'm doing and see how it goes.

    short recovery ride Z1
    1-1:30 hour interval workout
    1.5 hour Z2-3 MTB
    2-4 hour MTB
    2-3 hour road easy

    Times will adjust as training season progresses.

    Then, make adjustments for the next event. Sounds like a lot of folks use a lot of different approaches (which is why I'm not getting consistent information from the webs). I'm looking to finish this race, at a reasonable time (which remains to be determined). No one is at risk of losing their spot on the podium .
    2017 Scott Spark 930
    2016 Fuji Grand Fondo Classico 1.3
    2017 Marin Nicasio gravel bike

  15. #15
    Rides all the bikes!
    Reputation: Sidewalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    2,606
    About 90% of my riding is on the road. My mountain bike riding is usually fun oriented on my Enduro. My road riding is commuting and long rides. 2 hour road ride yesterday was zones 4/5 (not currently training with power, but collecting data for planning purposes). Day before was was about an hour each 1-4, relatively easy road ride.

    If you can get out on some trails that you can spend multiple hours on (4-5 hours) that would be great. If not, maybe spend a couple of hours on skill and technique (fun, rowdy riding) and put big hours on the roadie.

    Regardless, have fun with it. I don't have a structured training plan. I just love riding bikes, which I do about 20 hours a week. I'm a triathlete converted to MTB. Racing Wildflower next month.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    388
    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    About 90% of my riding is on the road. My mountain bike riding is usually fun oriented on my Enduro. My road riding is commuting and long rides. 2 hour road ride yesterday was zones 4/5 (not currently training with power, but collecting data for planning purposes). Day before was was about an hour each 1-4, relatively easy road ride.

    If you can get out on some trails that you can spend multiple hours on (4-5 hours) that would be great. If not, maybe spend a couple of hours on skill and technique (fun, rowdy riding) and put big hours on the roadie.

    Regardless, have fun with it. I don't have a structured training plan. I just love riding bikes, which I do about 20 hours a week. I'm a triathlete converted to MTB. Racing Wildflower next month.
    Cool! I have a couple trail networks that I can ride for an easy 4+ hours. One from my front door, the other is a 20 minute drive. I think once a week on those, most the rest road. Keeping it fun, YES!

    BTW, good luck at Wildflower. I've heard that's a blast of a weekend. One day...
    2017 Scott Spark 930
    2016 Fuji Grand Fondo Classico 1.3
    2017 Marin Nicasio gravel bike

  17. #17
    Rides all the bikes!
    Reputation: Sidewalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    2,606
    Quote Originally Posted by dfrink View Post
    Cool! I have a couple trail networks that I can ride for an easy 4+ hours. One from my front door, the other is a 20 minute drive. I think once a week on those, most the rest road. Keeping it fun, YES!

    BTW, good luck at Wildflower. I've heard that's a blast of a weekend. One day...
    Don't put it off too long. The race was cancelled last year due to the drought, the lake had dried up! A 40 year event will soon disappear due to climate change. I'm racing Long Course (70.3) but I am a fan of short distance (sprint and Oly). But since I have raced all the other WF courses, this might be my last chance to do LC so I'm going in with no run/swim training! Muscle memory, don't fail me now! It is an awesome event, tons of fun. That was my first tri in 2012 that my mom and her friend (Cal Poly grad) volunteer at and I was instantly hooked even if I did dog paddle the swim!

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    478
    I try and do one of my weekend rides on a Mountain bike and one on the road. I don't think you are wasting time on the mountain bike, you've got to work on functional endurance too. IE: coordination, skills, core activation etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by dfrink View Post

    My training plan (I don't have a coach, I kind of put this together from various sources) calls for 2 longer endurance workouts per week (like 2 hours, zone 3, 3 hours zone 2). This all makes sense from my other training background knowledge.

    I live in Norcal, everything here has hills. Average is close to 1k climbing per 10 miles. I had planned to do a longer MTB on the weekend, followed by a road ride for my endurance workouts. My local trails make staying at the low HR nearly impossible. My last 2 hour MTB had me at an average HR of 150 (Z3), BUT I spent 25% in Z5, 37% in Z4, 31% in Z1, and only 7% in Z2-3.

    Here is my question. Am I wasting time training on the MTB for my endurance workouts, or should I be doing all endurance workouts on the road or a trainer?

  19. #19
    Professional Slacker
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    2,870
    Why no road intervals?

    For long rides, and intervals, take the road bike. To polish/maintain skills, race prep and goofing around, MTB.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DITD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    40
    I keep it super simple.. Im doing my 8th Leadville in a row this year and last year I had my least structured plan ever and it resulted in my best time..

    I dont own a road bike or a trainer and stick to single track only for my training. Due to work I couldnt get any time to train during the week. So for 12 weeks before Leadville I did a 6 hour, single track only, hard ride every Saturday morning like clockwork.. Just rode a little easier the weekend before. Had the best race of my life..

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    388
    Quote Originally Posted by DITD View Post
    I keep it super simple.. Im doing my 8th Leadville in a row this year and last year I had my least structured plan ever and it resulted in my best time..

    I dont own a road bike or a trainer and stick to single track only for my training. Due to work I couldnt get any time to train during the week. So for 12 weeks before Leadville I did a 6 hour, single track only, hard ride every Saturday morning like clockwork.. Just rode a little easier the weekend before. Had the best race of my life..
    Well @$!%. That makes things pretty simple, lol.

    Leadville 8 times in a row though, that's impressive!

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    2017 Scott Spark 930
    2016 Fuji Grand Fondo Classico 1.3
    2017 Marin Nicasio gravel bike

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ucdengboss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by dfrink View Post
    My last 2 hour MTB had me at an average HR of 150 (Z3), BUT I spent 25% in Z5, 37% in Z4, 31% in Z1, and only 7% in Z2-3.
    Is this based on power meter? Heart rate? For a 2 hour ride that is about 1 hour and 15 minutes combined in Z4-5 (62%)!! That's impressive to me.

    I just have a wrist band for heart rate (dont know how accurate fit bit really is) and dont use it much but I am the opposite where I have a ton of Z2-3 and maybe 5% of Z4, 10% max. Maybe I just dont hurt myself enough on my rides...

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    388
    Quote Originally Posted by ucdengboss View Post
    Is this based on power meter? Heart rate? For a 2 hour ride that is about 1 hour and 15 minutes combined in Z4-5 (62%)!! That's impressive to me.

    I just have a wrist band for heart rate (dont know how accurate fit bit really is) and dont use it much but I am the opposite where I have a ton of Z2-3 and maybe 5% of Z4, 10% max. Maybe I just dont hurt myself enough on my rides...

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Data was HR from a chest strap connected to a Garmin Fenix 3. The trails by my house are all up and down, average of close to 1000' of climbing per 10 miles. Tough to do these climbs and stay in Z3 or lower. Also, on this ride I hit my RD on a rock and broke 3 teeth off the upper pulley so I had no granny gear on my 11 speed. This didn't help for trying to keep HR low. I did a 3 hour ride last weekend in the same area (with the RD all fixed up). Really tried to keep the HR in Z2-3. Ended up with Z5 12%, Z4 24%, Z3 19%, Z2 18%, Z1 27%. 27.9 miles, 3750' climbing.
    2017 Scott Spark 930
    2016 Fuji Grand Fondo Classico 1.3
    2017 Marin Nicasio gravel bike

  24. #24
    Professional Slacker
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    2,870
    You shouldn't have to have such a high average HR for that kind of climbing. Only you know why it would be that high, but it doesn't need to be that high if you were doing well at Olympic triathlons

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ucdengboss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by dfrink View Post
    Data was HR from a chest strap connected to a Garmin Fenix 3. The trails by my house are all up and down, average of close to 1000' of climbing per 10 miles. Tough to do these climbs and stay in Z3 or lower. Also, on this ride I hit my RD on a rock and broke 3 teeth off the upper pulley so I had no granny gear on my 11 speed. This didn't help for trying to keep HR low. I did a 3 hour ride last weekend in the same area (with the RD all fixed up). Really tried to keep the HR in Z2-3. Ended up with Z5 12%, Z4 24%, Z3 19%, Z2 18%, Z1 27%. 27.9 miles, 3750' climbing.
    I am no expert by any means but I thought Z5 efforts were like hard to maintain for even a minute or so at a time. Not a maintainable pace at all. I will maybe have 1% in Z5. Again I dont push real hard a lot though. What is your max heart rate?

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    388
    Hmmmm. Maybe my zones aren't set up correctly? I have them set in trainingpeaks. My lactate threshold is 167 (calculated using my fenix 3 from running, I know it's different for biking but I don't have a power meter to get an estimate), max is 185.

    Z1 = <135
    Z2 = 136-147
    Z3 = 148-155
    Z4 = 156-166
    Z5A= 167-171
    Z5B= 172-176
    Z5C= 177-185

    FYI, I RARELY get above low 170's during a ride for any amount of time.

    I'm still learning about HR based training. Does this look off?

    Side note, I'm 39. Exercise an average of 6 times per week. In the last year I had a full heart lab, EKG and doppler cardiogram done. Dr. said my numbers would indicate I'm a "poster child" for heart health.
    2017 Scott Spark 930
    2016 Fuji Grand Fondo Classico 1.3
    2017 Marin Nicasio gravel bike

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    388
    After looking at trainingpeaks, and doing some reading I re-calculated my HR zones (using the Karvonan max and resting HR method). They would come out as follows:

    Z1=129-142
    Z2=143-156
    Z3=157-170
    Z4= 171-185
    Z5= 186+

    Now I'm thinking the numbers I got from trainingpeaks and have been using weren't correct. Looking at the numbers above, during the ride I mentioned in post #23 I would be mostly in Z2-3.

    Thoughts?
    2017 Scott Spark 930
    2016 Fuji Grand Fondo Classico 1.3
    2017 Marin Nicasio gravel bike

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ucdengboss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    252
    Those look a bit better, again I am not an expert. Z5 cannot be correct though. If your max is 185 then Z5 cannot be 186+. That would mean Z5 is unreachable.

    Based on a 184 max the first photo shows my zones. A Z5 of 178-184 makes sense... extreme effort right up to your max. Z2 being 108-143 is pretty comfortable and easy paced ride. My avg on that ride was 123 and only had 9% in Z3 and 76% Z2.

    The second one was avg 140 and had a lot more Z3 effort at 46%

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    388
    Great catch on that. The method on TP that I used only gave 4 zones, I thought they didn't report Z5. I guess it was Z1 (so they gave me 2-5). That matches what you show on you screen shots from strava. Seems there are so many different methods to use though... I've read calculations using 5 zones, 3 zones, and widely different percentages for each zone then the standard 70,80,90, etc.

    Since the strava zones at least SEEM to make sense maybe I'll just plug those into my watch and go off that for now.

    I know this topic can be VERY lengthy to discuss however I welcome all the feedback. Thanks ucdengboss for bringing all this up. It's clarifying why I had the original question in the first place.

    To add to the confusion.

    https://support.strava.com/hc/en-us/...ted-in-Strava-
    2017 Scott Spark 930
    2016 Fuji Grand Fondo Classico 1.3
    2017 Marin Nicasio gravel bike

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ucdengboss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    252
    So to the original question... sorry to get off track. I would like to know experienced cyclist take on road bike vs MTB as well for building endurance levels of fitness.

    I do ride both but am limited to no more than about 8 hours max per week. I will further say that some of the road rides where you are putting out constant power levels for a good couple hours can be devastating... in a good way. The same can be said about a more intervalish MTB ride with steep frequent climbs that can be painful and there are hard Z4 efforts repeatedly. I guess that both must be good for you as they both have a lot of stress and force adaptations in different ways.

    Lastly I would add that when I hit only the road bike and trainer with no MTB at all say for 6 weeks+ I lose other fitness. When I do get back on the MTB my back, core, and even arms are not ready the way the legs are. I will be sore in the upper body for a couple days. This cannot be good for endurance racing (that I have never done BTW). I would think you need the complete package ready for those extended endurance efforts.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    861
    Quote Originally Posted by ucdengboss View Post
    So to the original question... sorry to get off track. I would like to know experienced cyclist take on road bike vs MTB as well for building endurance levels of fitness.

    I do ride both but am limited to no more than about 8 hours max per week. I will further say that some of the road rides where you are putting out constant power levels for a good couple hours can be devastating... in a good way. The same can be said about a more intervalish MTB ride with steep frequent climbs that can be painful and there are hard Z4 efforts repeatedly. I guess that both must be good for you as they both have a lot of stress and force adaptations in different ways.

    Lastly I would add that when I hit only the road bike and trainer with no MTB at all say for 6 weeks+ I lose other fitness. When I do get back on the MTB my back, core, and even arms are not ready the way the legs are. I will be sore in the upper body for a couple days. This cannot be good for endurance racing (that I have never done BTW). I would think you need the complete package ready for those extended endurance efforts.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    I ride both road and MTB, train with a coach and would consider myself fairly knowledgable and reasonably decent performing (320w ftp, roughly low 160s weight).

    Here is how I usually build the different "types" of fitness

    Base and sweet spot miles: road and trainer are the most effective ways to get this
    Threshold/speed work: Trainer, Zwift races, or group rides
    V02 Max: Trainer or MTB
    Sprint: primarily on the road (usually in controlled areas for safety)
    Skills: MTB

    My usual week (currently) looks like

    Monday: rest
    Tuesday: 90 minute sweetspot workout on the trainer (3x15 @90-95% or similar)
    Wednesday: Endurance ride
    Thursday: VO2 max work on MTB (90-120 second attacks, recover at tempo pace during a long climb) with skills work on the way down
    Friday: easy spin
    Saturday: long group ride/climbing road ride
    Sunday: MTB however I feel like

    This gets me between 500-600TSS with around 8-12 hours of riding and covers a variety skills and fitness.

    I primarily race Marathon XC events as my "A" races, with some gravel 100 milers and local XC races for fun.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    388
    Quote Originally Posted by Udyr View Post
    I ride both road and MTB, train with a coach and would consider myself fairly knowledgable and reasonably decent performing (320w ftp, roughly low 160s weight).

    Here is how I usually build the different "types" of fitness

    Base and sweet spot miles: road and trainer are the most effective ways to get this
    Threshold/speed work: Trainer, Zwift races, or group rides
    V02 Max: Trainer or MTB
    Sprint: primarily on the road (usually in controlled areas for safety)
    Skills: MTB

    My usual week (currently) looks like

    Monday: rest
    Tuesday: 90 minute sweetspot workout on the trainer (3x15 @90-95% or similar)
    Wednesday: Endurance ride
    Thursday: VO2 max work on MTB (90-120 second attacks, recover at tempo pace during a long climb) with skills work on the way down
    Friday: easy spin
    Saturday: long group ride/climbing road ride
    Sunday: MTB however I feel like

    This gets me between 500-600TSS with around 8-12 hours of riding and covers a variety skills and fitness.

    I primarily race Marathon XC events as my "A" races, with some gravel 100 milers and local XC races for fun.
    Udyr, thank you for this! Super helpful as a guideline for training.

    FYI, after adjusting my HR zones and doing two rides it has become clear that I CAN in fact do some of my endurance workouts on dirt and stay in Z2-3.
    2017 Scott Spark 930
    2016 Fuji Grand Fondo Classico 1.3
    2017 Marin Nicasio gravel bike

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    26
    For TT100 you might consider putting in some of your training at Tahoe altitude. I definitely felt it when I did that race.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    861
    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleIPA View Post
    For TT100 you might consider putting in some of your training at Tahoe altitude. I definitely felt it when I did that race.
    This is a good idea. I'll be at Lost and Found (the gravel event) for the 100 mile which I'll use as my main altitude prep prior to Tahoe (and other altitude events I have planned like TOU Ultimate Challenge, Park City P2P)

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    388
    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleIPA View Post
    For TT100 you might consider putting in some of your training at Tahoe altitude. I definitely felt it when I did that race.
    For sure. I'll be up there next weekend pre-riding the XTERRA Tahoe City course, and probably get back up there at least 2-3 more times before the 100k.
    2017 Scott Spark 930
    2016 Fuji Grand Fondo Classico 1.3
    2017 Marin Nicasio gravel bike

Similar Threads

  1. cross training/ offseason training for dh
    By mattyboi in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 01-23-2015, 01:38 PM
  2. Training Spreadsheet and Guide to Annual Training Plan
    By MrEconomics in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-28-2012, 09:51 AM
  3. Training Peaks MTB Training Plans
    By sumgai in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-22-2012, 04:50 AM
  4. Endurance training vs XC training- Base mile version
    By Johnny K in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 09-16-2011, 08:01 AM
  5. MTB training movie survey (X-Post Training)
    By PissedOffCil in forum Videos and POV Cameras
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-07-2011, 07:05 AM

Members who have read this thread: 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.