Optimal endurance pacing (HR)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Optimal endurance pacing (HR)

    Not referring to the pace you actually do, but what you think would provide the best results without outside influences. Pretend you're doing a four hour trainer session competition with friends.

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    Quote Originally Posted by richde View Post
    Not referring to the pace you actually do, but what you think would provide the best results without outside influences. Pretend you're doing a four hour trainer session competition with friends.
    This is a bloody nebulous question without the context of your individual fitness or cardiovascular response.

  3. #3
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    Any reason it simply wouldn't be "just below LT"?

    -CJB

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    92-96% of your LTHR would be my guess. In 6-hour races I shoot for about 88-92% of my LTHR.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CBaron View Post
    Any reason it simply wouldn't be "just below LT"?

    -CJB
    Because it's not a cliff you fall into, it's a slope you slide down with your LT being a point on the slope.

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    I think it would be less slope-like if you were doing you *ride* on trainer. But what do I really know, I've been a PE only guy for 20 yrs now. That being said, I've done that so long that I think I'm pretty darn good at knowing where my zones are.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CBaron View Post
    I think it would be less slope-like if you were doing you *ride* on trainer. But what do I really know, I've been a PE only guy for 20 yrs now. That being said, I've done that so long that I think I'm pretty darn good at knowing where my zones are.

    Later,
    CJB
    It depends on your meaning of the word "just" in this situation. It's the internet and we all like to keep it brief, sometimes too brief.

    The reason I'm asking is that last year I did a race at what I'd consider just under the area I'd consider my LT and while I don't feel like I did poorly, it seems like I could have done better. That, combined with some recent road rides that involve repeating routes where I was able to maintain really close to an even pace (within a minute for the same 30 minute effort) at the same HR and PE when I stayed aerobic, as much as terrain and discipline allowed, made me rethink my idea of "just under" in this context.

    I guess that's a good reason to race more often.

  8. #8
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    I used to use HR, with a brief foray in power, for the longest time. While I think itís great for the Dolph Lundgren types, that like to dissect numbers for hours and follow strict training plans, Iíve moved over the the Rocky style PE training. There are just too many variables in an off-road endurance ride to use HR as the sole determiner of pacing. There are days where your HR will keep you from your peak performance like you said you felt happened during a race.

    I feel like HR numbers, during a race, can limit your physical performance by mentally distracting you from reaching your available potential.

    For training, my thinking would change though. But, to answer your original question, Iíd try to maintain 90% (+/- 4).


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jake2185 View Post
    I used to use HR, with a brief foray in power, for the longest time. While I think itís great for the Dolph Lundgren types, that like to dissect numbers for hours and follow strict training plans, Iíve moved over the the Rocky style PE training. There are just too many variables in an off-road endurance ride to use HR as the sole determiner of pacing. There are days where your HR will keep you from your peak performance like you said you felt happened during a race.

    I feel like HR numbers, during a race, can limit your physical performance by mentally distracting you from reaching your available potential.

    For training, my thinking would change though. But, to answer your original question, Iíd try to maintain 90% (+/- 4).


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    +1 on all that.

    Except your +/- 4% should be 3.95%!
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jake2185 View Post
    I used to use HR, with a brief foray in power, for the longest time. While I think itís great for the Dolph Lundgren types, that like to dissect numbers for hours and follow strict training plans, Iíve moved over the the Rocky style PE training. There are just too many variables in an off-road endurance ride to use HR as the sole determiner of pacing. There are days where your HR will keep you from your peak performance like you said you felt happened during a race.

    I feel like HR numbers, during a race, can limit your physical performance by mentally distracting you from reaching your available potential.

    For training, my thinking would change though. But, to answer your original question, Iíd try to maintain 90% (+/- 4).

    Yep, I'm with you on this. I got rid of HR monitor & bike computer over 20 yrs ago. I always said that "when I feel good, I'll go harder; when I feel bad, I'll go slower". I used this philosophy to a fairly successful amateur racing palmares. However, I do think that we each need to find "the way" that works for oneself. Some personalities just can't tolerate my self-imposed luddite plan. As for myself, I have to find way to make the riding and training "fun". Too much structure and numbers begins to feel like a chore/work.

    Later,
    CJB

  11. #11
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    I have been doing long 3+ hour z2 rides on trainer. Power is low but I'm in quite a bit of pain at the end. My heart would rise to 150 or so over the last hour, which is above the 135 or so i'd expect for my aerobic threshold. I wasn't sure if I should lower the effort more even though i'm not accumulating 'too much' fatigue. Well.. today it was almost freezing, I was on trainer with fan and because nice and cool my hr stayed below 130. Average 125 where normally it is 133-135. Looks like the high heart rates were from cardiac drift due to overheating.

    So, point? Hr seems to have lots of variation due to heat and dehydration, mood, sleep, fatigue...

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