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  1. #1
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    Is my 24 HR solo pit crew missing anything?

    Is my pit crew missing anything or does anyone have any advice for our crew. This will be our pit crews first time to do this and they will be supporting 3 solo riders. Trying to be over prepared and think I've thought of everything...

    24 solo riders in Female solo open, Men's solo sport (cat 2/3), and Men's solo open (cat 1/pro).

    Each rider has back up bike
    2 lighted easy ups with bike stands, tools, and parts
    Nutrition tweaked by infinit nutrition (2 separate mixes for each)
    Using Find my iPhone app to monitor rider location by GPS on trail
    Pit crew boss to assign duties, 2nd person is EMT and stuff for iv, and 3rd person is message therapist with table
    Clip boards with forms to monitor rider lap info after each lap...HR, lap time, pit time, place, etc.
    Crew will monitor water intake and mix intake. Goals of 1/2 bottle of mix every 30 minutes and 20-30 oz of water an hour.
    Lights with two batteries (3 hr and 5 hour battery) each. Trail LED lights and they will be there as a sponsor
    Lots of bottled water and ice water in igloo
    Two RV's parked next to bike shop team with bike mechanics
    Extra wheel sets for each bike
    laptop to monitor official standings and input lap data for review
    basket of banana's
    Extra shorts, jersey's, gloves, socks, A&D or Butt Butter
    Using camelbak racebaks for water and bike bottles for nutrition mix
    first 4 laps are planed...then who knows what will happen

  2. #2
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    What event is this?

  3. #3
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    Only things missing are the Reaper Drone to give live feeds to the pit crew and a hand held ultrasound machine for your EMS crew...







    Sounds like you have war-gamed this out quite well.



    Only thing I'd suggets wouldbe a variety of race foods. After several hours, some folks, myself included, crave some odd, off-the-wall stuff to eat.

  4. #4
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    Get rid of the camelbak's. Nothing worse than a 24 carrying a pack around. Hydration should be in the bottle along with some carbs. Stuff the solids/gels into the jersey pockets. Piss the iphones off and just go off lap times for "position". Times will fall off gradually so its pretty simple to work out. Don't over complicate it, its just riding a bike.

  5. #5
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    I'm doing the 24 hours of Rocky Hill in Texas. I've played around without camelbacks, but bike only holds one bottle. Laps are in the 1:05- 1:120 for me and very technical all single trac this year. I put 24 oz of water in pack and get a fast fill on transition of anther 24 oz. I can't drink enough without it.

    Bike bottle carries infinite, half bottle every 30 min. But our weather is hot, tomorrow will be our 85 day over 100 degrees this summer.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by crimecrusher View Post
    I'm doing the 24 hours of Rocky Hill in Texas.

    Been there, done that. FUN COURSE! Especially "fat Chuck", and that HUGE 'whoopdie" (I forgot the name) with the hard right turn after you fly back up the other side. Do they still have the Saloon that makes those AMAZING (and huge) "Rocky Burgers"?


    Fezi does have a point, or at least I agree with him. I only ride a pack at night, and even then, it's very 'minimalist' (a camelbak 'Rocket' I think) and to carry my battery. I can't stand the battery weight in my jersey pockets. Even then, it's only: battery and tools, etc.

    IMHO, Bottles are the way to go. Plus, your pit crew can hand you a 'dropper'...one you can chug from as you pass through, and then drop it a little ways past the transition.

    I'd ditch the fancy iphone stuff too...no need.


    Last edited by RSWMTB; 10-02-2011 at 11:37 AM.

  7. #7
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    You've got an RV (so this is probably covered) and it doesn't sound like you plan on being off the bike much but I like: towels, soap, sunscreen.
    Ear plugs for the night before.
    Clear lenses in your sunglasses for night.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSWMTB View Post
    Only thing I'd suggets wouldbe a variety of race foods. After several hours, some folks, myself included, crave some odd, off-the-wall stuff to eat.
    I second that. I would bring as wide a variety of food as humanly possible. What your stomach wants isn't something you can control.

    You might also want like ten spare eyePhones in case the ones you're carying run out of battery... I know that eyePhones have better battery life than 'droid phones in general, but I can't imagine your eyePhone lasting 24hrs with the GPS running continuously.

    Good luck with your race! Sounds like you're ready!
    Brought to you by rocks.

  9. #9
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    I'd simplify the data collection a bit. Lap times, pit times etc are nice to analyse after the race but don't mean squat during. What place you are in is more important (and the gap between you and the rider in front and behind) and can be hard work for the pit crew to keep track of. Official standings can be slow to be put up and are occasionaly misleading, you are better off relying on your crew to watch for riders.
    I would also suggest you think about the switch from day time to night riding. That pit stop can stretch out beyond belief if you aren't ready for it. Ideal is to have clothing for the night ready, a spare helmet set up with a light and a spare bike ready for the night too. If lights have to go on after the start of the race decide whether the rider is going to put them on or be very sure that your pit crew knows exactly how you like them setup and has everything accessible before the switch
    I'm kinda interested about how the GPS tracking goes. Can't imagine using it myself but would like to know whether it works for someone else.
    Cheers, Dave

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by crimecrusher View Post
    I'm doing the 24 hours of Rocky Hill in Texas. I've played around without camelbacks, but bike only holds one bottle. Laps are in the 1:05- 1:120 for me and very technical all single trac this year. I put 24 oz of water in pack and get a fast fill on transition of anther 24 oz. I can't drink enough without it.

    Bike bottle carries infinite, half bottle every 30 min. But our weather is hot, tomorrow will be our 85 day over 100 degrees this summer.
    I've raced 2 x 24 Solos on that course and several 12's and 6's during the 2yrs that we lived in Sugar Land. I've seen pretty much every inch of dirt out there, none of it is technical by Canadian standards, but it is really fun riding. I was pretty close to travelling down and doing it again this year just because I dig the grassroots feel, the race organizers are super cool and it's a fun course... but that would be my 4th 24 Solo this year and I still have a couple of races left in Oct. Maybe next year I'll get back down.

    Personally, I think you should ditch the camelbacks as you can keep one bottle on the bike and one in your back jersey pocket. Bottles are smarter for a variety of reasons.

    Three of my athletes are racing RHR in the 24 Solo mens category, I expect all three will do really well. Two of them were racing the Canmore 24 Solo this summer and placed 2nd and 5th overall, they are also looking good for this event. If you want to drop me a line I can put you in contact with them and they will be able to give you a hand on-site if you have any questions as they have their systems down and are experienced racers.

    Good luck at the race, it's a great event, be sure to enjoy it.

  11. #11
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    Practice?

    It's hard to work as a unit if everyone is getting together for the first time that night.

  12. #12
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    Can I come race with (for?) you? My 12 hour solo was such an experience. wow! Great setup!

    I'd suggest chairs for the riders to sit. 5 minutes of sitting while my support resupplied everything (and I ate something) did wonders for my morale.

    Pepsi or Coke (whatever each rider likes best). After about 8 hours, I find part of one incredible. What did your riders want while training?
    If you can be blissfully ignorant to the notion that something is impossible, then you might surprise yourself. -- Andrea138

  13. #13
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    Still 2 weeks till race and I'll update everyone how it goes. We did a 6 hour pre-ride this weekend testing things out. We learned a few lessons.

    Nutrition- set timers on watch to remind us to drink mix because we got behind. May need to concentrate mix (infinit ) to 1.5 doses in a bottle for the longer laps later in the race. Needed more water. At 87 degrees, 24 oz of water wasn't enough. We are using the camelbak raceback that fits into a undershirt jersey sleeve, not a traditional backpack type. This fits under the team jersey and can hold up to 70 oz depending on how much we decide to fill it. The hose comes out of some wholes we had sewn into our jersey to allow the camelback hose to stay low profile. I've used this setup for a few races this year and will try it for the 24hr. Takes about 15-20 seconds for a my pit crew to fill it and close it. I didn't like the flopping of the bottle in the jersey pocket and the slower riding while drinking with one hand. This way if I need more water per lap...crew can put more in. Downside...it makes you look like a hunchback and you have to stop to get a re-fill.

    Bike maintenance - our lube we are now using (T9) lasted about 2 hours longer than Rock N Roll. Got all 6 hours out of this. However, that was after letting it sit and dry all night the night before. T9 appears to take longer to dry and may have to use the RNR after 6 hours.

    The iPhone GPS app - Worked great. I rode the course and mapped with my iPhone last week, then printed it out. Crew was able to look at their iPhone and see exactly where on the course we were and if we were moving. If I had an issue...then I had a phone to call for help and get another rider to ride us parts etc. I kept phone in my seat pouch turned on.
    Data after each lap - not feasible to get too much information. Avg HR, lap time, and how we feel is all we can get out. Crew will tell us where and how other riders are doing and our placing.

    Other lessons, don't sit down and get comfortable, don't leave mix out on table or ants will get it, and A&D works well if not better than chamois butter. Keep Excedrin and chapstick handy at transition.

  14. #14
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    Sounds like your really prepared, in fact almost to prepared. Have you ever done any sort of endurance events before? You may be over thinking this whole thing. Maybe use the Iphones at night, but they will not last 24 hours and will become a annoying after a while, just one more thing to worry about really.

    I agree with the others, bottles is the way to go hands down. Get used to riding with one on your back. It is the best way to monitor fluid intake. Also make sure you train with the increased Infinit bottles before you race. I can't handle an increased dosage but your mileage may vary. I also agree about having a larger variety of food.

    If you need an IV you may want to seriously consider dropping out, not worth killing yourself over.

    Squirt lube has worked well for me. Also, not a bad idea to carry a small backup light. Something like a Petzle Tikka seems to fit the bill nicely. Just in case.

    Is a 6 hour ride the longest you have done really??
    CyclingCentralVa.org

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidR1 View Post
    Sounds like your really prepared, in fact almost to prepared. Have you ever done any sort of endurance events before? You may be over thinking this whole thing. Maybe use the Iphones at night, but they will not last 24 hours and will become a annoying after a while, just one more thing to worry about really.

    I agree with the others, bottles is the way to go hands down. Get used to riding with one on your back. It is the best way to monitor fluid intake. Also make sure you train with the increased Infinit bottles before you race. I can't handle an increased dosage but your mileage may vary. I also agree about having a larger variety of food.

    If you need an IV you may want to seriously consider dropping out, not worth killing yourself over.

    Squirt lube has worked well for me. Also, not a bad idea to carry a small backup light. Something like a Petzle Tikka seems to fit the bill nicely. Just in case.

    Is a 6 hour ride the longest you have done really??

    Can't disagree with you...I know I'm too prepared but will adapt as the race starts. Better to have and not need than to need and not have. Thanks for the tip about concentrating the mixes...I'm a little leary about that since I haven't tried it yet.

    Have a small NR 250 lumens handlebar light as a back up. Have done a 24 (2 person), a 12 hour (2 person) and a few 6 hours in the last year. This will be my first 24 solo that I've prepared for the last year. Don't really know how it will go other than I won't quit unless the body stops working. I can currently ride for 6 hours with my HR under 150 average at consistance lap times competitive with last years top riders.

    I have a goal of leaving the race saying I did my best and not having any regrets. Hopefully that results in a top 5 finish.

    This race will be almost as much about mental toughness as physical talent. I competed in military endurance events 20 years ago that make a 24hr bike race look easy. I hope to still be able to tap into that mindset that will hopefully give me that edge others don't have.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by crimecrusher View Post
    as much about mental toughness

    They always are.


    So are the long ruck marhces, Best Ranger, Selection, etc.

  17. #17
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    Preparation for a successful 24 Solo requires many components.

    Try to enjoy your first one.

  18. #18
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    So, how did it go? I just read everything and am curious now.

  19. #19
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    Our open racer wasn't able to make it due not getting off work. Our Solo female open racer won first place and did awesome. I was racing sport solo and got a bad case of GI that started around hour 4 and got the point of was throwing up at hour 11. At one point I rode into 4th around hour 9 and started falling back after a flat and getting sick. I took 3 hours off then started riding again, but my nutrition was so messed up by then I was throwing up two laps later and had to pull out. When I pulled out, I'd dropped down to 12th and finished 13th of 26 in my class. I couldn't hold down any water or food till around 10:45 the next morning after a night of violently throwing up. I offered to ride with my wife to help her through the last few laps...but she had just passed into first place and was able to pull off two more laps to win by 2 laps.
    The camelbak...don't know how I'd done without it. I was drinking 50oz of water an hour and this was the only way to carry enough water since my bike only holds one bottle. Race temps got to around 93 degrees and everyone seemed to be suffering and cramping.
    The iphone trick worked great. I just slid it into my jersey pocket and my pit crew was able to watch us on the laptop in the pit area. They could see exactly where I was on the trail, how fast I was going, and able to pin point when I would be in the transition area. No app running just needed to be turned on so battery was not an issue. Not to mention, this gave us a way of communication during the race. I was able to let my crew know I had a flat with a torn side wall so have my back up bike ready and be prepared to put a new tire on my primary bike. The phone was also great for our female riders last lap when we knew she was in first but didn't know by how much. 30 minutes into her last lap, we texted her that she was 1 lap plus 30 minutes ahead and 2nd wasn't going back out so just ride smooth and take it easy...you won.
    I've exchanged several emails with infinit about my GI issues and here is what we think happened. I had too much protein and started to feel bloating around hour 3. I should have switched to my light mix then but didn't until hour 4-5 as planned. Once I was bloated and started having an upset stomach, the caffeine in my light mix made it worse. This problem continued to compound itself till it shut me down around hour 11. Good part was I never got hungry and felt strong...my lap times were still within a 4 minutes of each other until my stomach shut me down.
    Our pit crew was awesome and took great care of us. We learned a few lessons on nutrition and our crew needs to be meaner getting us out of the pit. I was cramping in the early hours and it felt good to lean over the bike while one person filled my pack with water, I drank some water, and the other messaged my cramping legs. I had a couple 5-10 minute pit stops that I should have been kicked out after 2 minutes.
    I'll try it again next year and couldn't be more proud of my wife for winning the female solo.

  20. #20
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    Sorry to hear about the GI nightmare...

    I feel your pain...I got mucho sick during the 2008 Shenandoah 100. I made the mistake of drinking HEED (friggin monkey p--s) @ one of the checkpoints, and was spewing gut lava for the next couple of hours...and I didn't want a DNF, so I kept going...ugh. I'll never touch that s--t again, unless maybe in a SERE situation or something...


    HEED blowz.


    Wow...your wife was READING TEXT MESSAGES while racing????



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