Jeff @ Carousel Design Works- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Jeff @ Carousel Design Works

    I'm trying to get in touch with Jeff about some of his bags and I'm not having much luck. His site has been under construction for the last month and my emails to him are getting kicked back. Does anyone have a phone number for his business or know if he is on here and what his username might be so I can hook up with him?

    -river

  2. #2
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    Hey river,

    Jeff here - I go by mountainboat around these parts.

    My apologies to anyone who has been unable to get in touch with me recently. My email account has been filling up with spam faster than I can get rid of it lately, and I have been missing some messages for awhile.....that and the weather in the Sierra's has been too good not to go riding!

    Anyone trying to contact me about gear can reach me at my new email: jeff[at]carouseldesignworks[dot]com

    .....or give me a call at (209)532-3012 - I do better with answering questions on the phone.

    I've got some cool new projects I'm working on!.....more details soon!

    Here are a few shots of some stuff I've been building lately:

    Frame bag for an 18" Pugsley with top and bottom compartments, full wrap attachments (for a really well tensioned fit on the frame), zip out divider, zip access on both sides and stretch gussets on all zippers.
    pug1.jpg

    Extra large handlebar bag with dual-ended roll top closures, expandable volume, closed cell foam stiffener/sit pad, abrasion patch, and gusseted pockets.
    sb1.jpg

    .....and straps long enough to store a some gear under
    sb2.jpg

    This road bike frame bag has H2O resistant zips w/ locking sliders, stretch gussets, full wrap attachments, and closed cell foam lining the down and seat tubes (to protect the carbon)
    rb1.jpg

    rb2.jpg
    I sew stuff.

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  3. #3
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    Perfect Jeff!

    I do have some specific questions about options so a phone call would probably be best. I'll be in touch real soon man.

    -Chris

  4. #4
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    Jeff,

    New stuff looks great. I have tried emailing twice but no luck. I will try calling as well. Very interested in seat pack and use of silnylon.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  5. #5
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    That Pugs frame bag looks very nice!
    Jeff's stuff is the best I've seen and used.

  6. #6
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    I'm hoping to use his stuff on the CTR this summer. I just spoke with him this afternoon. Seems to know his stuff and easy to talk to. I just can't decide if I want to do a full frame pack or a frame pack where I can put water bottles in. Any input from ya'll? I'm mostly worried about the hike a biking I'll be doing. I know he has a handle on it, but what if I want to change hand positions?
    Sorry, just thinking out loud...

  7. #7
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    sherpaxc, think away. One thought, you would mount water bottles elsewhere. I did a search on Carousel Design Works on Google and found the following under the images:

    Sorry can't link to the hosted photo, use link. Basically you could mount two water bottle cages to your fork, one on each side.
    http://omgbikes.blogspot.com/2007/06...ike-ready.html

    Two Fish makes water bottles cages which can be attached via velcro.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  8. #8
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    This was a pack I had made by Jeff so I could still utilize the water bottle spots, well one of them in the frame. I could cram a bottle into the other one if I needed to.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
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    Guys and gals, Jeff knows whats up. His ideas are thought through and his stitching is professional and bomber. My system for the GDR was puuuurfect ... and no racks.

    Can't wait to see the full winter set up, should be slick, poogies included.

    Sherpaxc- get the full frame bag, throw your bottles away, stop at the store on your way to the event and buy you favorite soft drinks and throw them in the bag. Throw away when done or refill or buy new ones when available. Sling your water on your back. This is how I see it if you are stepping up your kit that much to need the space of a frame bag. Just my opinion and style.

    www.JayPsDirt.com

  10. #10
    Exactly 1/2 of 2-Epic
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay P
    Sherpaxc- get the full frame bag, throw your bottles away, stop at the store on your way to the event and buy you favorite soft drinks and throw them in the bag. Throw away when done or refill or buy new ones when available. Sling your water on your back. This is how I see it if you are stepping up your kit that much to need the space of a frame bag. Just my opinion and style.

    www.JayPsDirt.com
    Jay - that sounds super space efficient, but how would you drink those soft drinks on the fly?
    Dave

    Anything is possible. The impossible just takes longer.

    2 Epic

  11. #11
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    What I'm wondering is if the Tarryall Detour is in effect or if we are going to hike that section. That will change my pack plans. I'm mainly leaning towards a full frame pack with 2 compartments. Did any of you have any issues with your knees rubbing the frame pack or the handlebar bag? I do a lot of standing climbing (SS) and am a little worried that I'll have this amazing handlebar bag that my knees hit!
    I know it's a long way off, but I've got to have something to think about! Anyone have any other pics of your frame packs set up?

  12. #12
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    do those handlebar bags lie against the headtube? or is there some other support i can t see?
    For a rock steady Gas Tank bag > the DeWidget

    bit.ly/BuyDeWidget

    https://www.instagram.com/drj0n_bagworks/

  13. #13
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    Dave, you just need to go to this site and order yourself a "Cantainer".


    http://www.chubbyscruisers.com/shop/...der-p-115.html

  14. #14
    Time to go farther
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    I'm not giving up my bottle spots, at least 2 of them. They're too handy for my useage (water treatment and powders). I like having the little sized frame bag up in the front of the main triangle but I have a big frame so that leaves me space to carry the bike and put bottles in there.
    On-One Lurcher SS
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  15. #15
    AKA jefftron3000
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    Though y'all might appreciate a few more pics to help answer any questions.

    These shots are of my personal dirtbag bikepacking rig w/ a set of bags I made.

    Full stiffy, friction shifting, 3-speed 29er with rim brakes and flat pedals = K.I.S.S.

    b1.jpg

    b2.jpg

    Here you can see my cockpit set-up utilizing a 5"x11" handlebar bag made from lightweight silicone coated nylon w/ a 500D Cordura abrasion patch and stretch mesh pocket.
    b3.jpg

    I run a riser bar to eliminate any interference between my controls and the bag. Multiple hand positions. ESI grips w/ cork foam over-wrap. Also check out the Pauls thumbie mounted under the bars. I've got a pretty short stem (75mm X 25D rise) and I have no issues with hitting my knees on the bag.
    b5.jpg

    Here is a close up of my "smaller" sized seat bag. Its made of a mix of silnylon and lightweight Cordura. Notice the duct tape/dirtbag gravity stopper and custom pad under the nose of the saddle for hike-a-bike carrying. This is truly the missing link in most folk's bikepacking set-ups, IMHO. I have also sewn a piece of closed cell foam into the seat bag attachment on this bag to create a nice, comfy, shoulder yoke for carrying. It has been a revelation for me while doing long technical trails that require lots of hike-a-bike.
    b4.jpg

    You can also see the carry strap on my frame bag in that picture. It comes in really handy, and I don't miss being able to grab my frame there at all.

    other thoughts on frame bags......

    I know a lot of folks can be reluctant to give up their water bottle cages, but using a full frame bag doesn't mean you have to give up bottles. In fact, with a full frame bag I can carry more bottles than with cages and they don't have to be bike bottles. I typically buy Gatorade Propel bottles, drink the contents, and keep refilling them until they wear out. Sure, unzipping the frame bag means an extra step in the process of getting a drink, but I really appreciate the extra capacity and versatility a frame bag affords, and if you are really concerned with getting a fast drink, a hydration pack works great. That's just my opinion, but I wouldn't knock it until you've tried it.

    I also make partial frame bags, like Pete B's, also if you want to preserve your cages.
    Last edited by mountainboat; 12-08-2007 at 02:35 AM.
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  16. #16
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    Sweet looking bike! The bags look great as well. Nice work.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by hairball_dh
    Jay - that sounds super space efficient, but how would you drink those soft drinks on the fly?
    Dave, on the fly I am drinking my water via 200oz bladder. When I stop to fix, adjust, rest, stretch, pee or something I dig into my frame bag for one of those drinks of sorts and chug-a-lug usually with a piece of food, since your stopped already. I have not fitered, iodined or scooped water since my early years of adventure racing. Way too many times of poo poo tasting water and poo poo coming out dealings. Just my experinces.

    You don't have to give up your water bottles just put them in your bag. You can ride, unzip, and drink with out stopping.

    JayP

  18. #18
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    Sherpa...

    I did talk with Stefan recently about the course and the race website (climbingdreams.net) has all the detours thoroughly laid out. The Taryall detour will be mandatory.

    -Chris

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    Thanks for the info. I've read pretty much the entire page but I just wasn't sure if this was something that was going to be changed after some time. No biggie either way, but that does make my decision easier. I spoke with Jeff and for now I'm getting a front bag and rear bag. In a couple months when I've got the cash I'll get my frame pack made as well. I'll post up pics of my setup when I get it all.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay P
    Dave, on the fly I am drinking my water via 200oz bladder. When I stop to fix, adjust, rest, stretch, pee or something I dig into my frame bag for one of those drinks of sorts and chug-a-lug usually with a piece of food, since your stopped already. I have not fitered, iodined or scooped water since my early years of adventure racing. Way too many times of poo poo tasting water and poo poo coming out dealings. Just my experinces.

    You don't have to give up your water bottles just put them in your bag. You can ride, unzip, and drink with out stopping.

    JayP

    Good info jay. What kinda hydration pack you using that will hold that huge 200 oz bladder?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by naked indian
    Good info jay. What kinda hydration pack you using that will hold that huge 200 oz bladder?
    I use to carry multiple bladders, they just stack up weird and pack awkwardly in a pack.
    Now a days they have bladder systems that are as small as 24 oz and as large as 5 gallons. The pack I choose and the bladder bottle system I use depends on the event.
    Have fun and stay hydrated!

    JayP

  22. #22
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    For you all that are sewing bags, can you get away with a standard sewing machine and a heavier needle? If not, do you have any suggestions for a commercial sewing machine and what you should look for. Thanks.
    Dan

  23. #23
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    Yes you can get away with it, However going through zipper and several layers of fabric will likely cause problems, using a home machine with a tripple straight stitch will really beef up the stiches, but is slow, or just go over them 3 times, use the beefiest 100% poly or nylon thread the machine can handle without jamming - not the cotton blend junk. Don't bother with the table top machines that are re-labeled as commercial (singer) -they have the same 1/10 hp motor as all the others. For an industrial machine, look for a used machine with a walking foot / compound needle feed, that is made for heavy duty work. Its a big investment, but then you can repair anything. Juki, Consew are some brand names however most are made in the same plant and have very similar designs.
    Last edited by Bearbait; 12-09-2007 at 04:57 PM.

  24. #24
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    Thanks Bearbait and just wondering if anyone has tried to still use a water bottle cage inside of a full triangle pack? I know it would cause extra stress on the material and you may have to reinforce those spots, therefore adding a little more weight. The upside is that it would add a little more organization to the pack.

  25. #25
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    Just for the record, Jeff did get back with me and full of useful information.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  26. #26
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    "just wondering if anyone has tried to still use a water bottle cage inside of a full triangle pack? I know it would cause extra stress on the material and you may have to reinforce those spots, therefore adding a little more weight. The upside is that it would add a little more organization to the pack."

    Hey dano49-

    I guess you could build a frame bag to accomodate water bottle cages inside. My first thought is that it would effectively negate the space above the bottles, thus making the frame bag kind of pointless, unless you want to remove whatever you have stacked on top of your bottles every time you want a drink.

    I've noticed that some folks seem real attached to bottle cages. I can understand where they are coming from in regards to speedy access for racing, but I think that the advantage of increased capacity and optimal center of gravity becomes more important as the ride passes the 24hr mark. The beauty of a frame bag that fills the whole front triangle and replaces cages is that you carry more bottles and gear....and they don't have to be bike bottles either.

    As in other applications of ultralight philosophy, whether it be backpacking, alpinism, or whatever, the best way to reduce the weight of a item is simply to eliminate it. Often the item must be replaced with skills and knowledge that allow you do without it, and still acheive your desired goals. This can be the case with frame bags that replace your bottle cages. You must replace the organization and security offered by bottle cages with packing skills and proper design. The purest expression of this would be a divider-less frame bag, like the one pictured above on my bike.

    I typically use that bag to carry two 20oz bottles, a shell jacket, warm hat, 2 tubes, tools, pump, and snacks. I pack the tubes into the bottom, then the tool sack on top of the tubes, and my pump along the down tube. Then I add my shell jacket and hat. I position one bottle along the seat tube and add the snacks and other bottle on top where I can get at them. When I empty one bottle, I stop and rotate the other bottle into the top position. With this packing system, I can easily grab a drink or snack on the fly. My stuff doesn't bounce around either. Part of this is due to my packing method, and part is due to the way I've designed and built my frame bag.

    I've designed my bikepacking frame bags to be about the same width as the downtube of the frame. I make sure I get an accurate pattern, for a bag that fits well. Another design element that makes a difference to the way the bag performs is the way I can wrap all the tubing in fabric and velcro along the length of the bag. This requires me to be able to handle the frame for fitting, but creates a frame bag that fits extremely well and essentially turns the bag into a tension structure stretched across the front triangle. The stretch gusset next to the zipper allows the bag to expand in width and still close easily. I also make bags from mailed patterns with multiple segmented straps for folks that don't want to ship their frame.

    I'm extremely happy with the performance of this kind of frame bag for rugged bikepacking applications. I also build wider/tapered frame bags for maximum volume, and partial frame bags for speedy access to bottle cages....really just depends on your needs.

    I hope that information helps folks with reservations about using a full triangle frame bags.


    Here's a peek at one of the items coming out of the shop lately.......


    This is an example of one of my roll-top style closure seat bags in the new large size for ultralight expedition touring and snow biking.

    Some features:

    -silnylon and lightweight Cordura construction
    -expandable volume
    -compression "wings" stiffened with HDPE
    -HDPE frame/stiffener
    -shock cord quick-stow strap on the bottom with webbing loops to attach something larger/heavier
    -reinforcement patch near seat post clamp
    -padded/gripper seat post tube for a secure fit

    .....also check out the trick pockets on the compression wings for strap management....."God is in the details" - Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

    ....this particular one weighs 8.3oz, but that might change a little.

    rt1.jpg

    rt2.jpg

    rt3.jpg

    rt4.jpg

    rt5.jpg

    .....you can also find a few more photos here: www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]

    .....more cool stuff coming soon. Stay tuned!
    Last edited by mountainboat; 12-15-2007 at 12:43 AM.
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  27. #27
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    Jeff,

    The new bag is beautiful. I love it.

    I like the expandable roll top more than the older design.


    Where do you go bikepacking in the Sierra? Anything east side Sierra? I see one photo near the Minarets. Beautiful area.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnfiend
    Jeff,

    The new bag is beautiful. I love it.

    I like the expandable roll top more than the older design.

    Where do you go bikepacking in the Sierra? Anything east side Sierra? I see one photo near the Minarets. Beautiful area.
    Glad you like the bag. I've played around with a roll top closure seat bag before, but this one is definitely more refined than past examples.

    I still make the drawstring and top-lid configuration for folks that want quicker access.

    I love the Sierras!

    That pic with the Minarets in the background was taken from a ridge adjacent Mammoth Mtn. on a day ride.

    I live in the foothills of the western slope of the Sierras and have done lots of bikepacking while exploring the area between Lake Tahoe and Yosemite.....lots of cool stuff.

    I see the Hwy 395 sign on your avatar......The East Side is beautiful, I definitely haven't explored there enough. I have done some overnighters north of the Mountain Warfare Training Center off Hwy 108, though.
    Last edited by mountainboat; 12-15-2007 at 05:29 PM.
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  29. #29
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    Jeff, I intend to use my new Niner MCR9 for bikepacking. The cables are top routed under the top tube. This would seem to interfere with your frame pack attachment design for the top attachment(s). How have you or could you work with/around this issue?

    Also what do you use for a stove and pot? And were do you store these items? I have a .9 liter Ti Evernew pot and plan to use my homemade Super Cat alcohol stove.

    Re Sierras...I live in Pasadena and frequent the eastern Sierra primarily. My friends and I have been working on climbing the CA 14ers. Last year was a bust. Fires prevented us from doing Williamson and Tyndall and weather prevented us from do Russell. We had to abandon ship on the saddle of Whitney and Russell due to what looked like lightning weather. We hope to get Russell this year.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  30. #30
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    Jeff,
    thanks for such a detailed response and it's great to hear everyone else's idea. Gotta remember I am not rowing a gear pig down the river. The seat bag looks great and have you made a triangle bag for a full suspension?

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    Jeff,
    thanks for such a detailed response and it's great to hear everyone else's idea. Gotta remember I am not rowing a gear pig down the river. The seat bag looks great and have you made a triangle bag for a full suspension?

  32. #32
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    Hi Y'all

    Just catching up after a busy holiday. Hope everybody had a good one.

    [QUOTE=dano49 have you made a triangle bag for a full suspension?[/QUOTE]

    Yeah, I've made frame bags for a few different suspension designs. If there is space, a bag can be made to fill it. I've found that lots of 4 bar linkage designs are good candidates for frame bags. The main thing is to be sure that the shock/linkage doesn't rub against the bag as it moves through the travel. This can require disconnectioning as least one end of the shock to move the swingarm through it's travel when patterning the bag.

    .....or you might meet your needs with a stock frame bag like this one:

    fp1.jpg

    This is a stock size I make. Its my take on a time tested design. I based the angles on modern frame specs, and used lightweight materials and a water-resistant zipper. I make 'em with other materials too. For reference, Bushwacker, Lone Peak, and Jandd make similar designs.

    mtnfiend-

    I've made lots of frame bags for bikes with cables routed under the top tube. My old Chameleon was set-up like that. I didn't notice any effect on the shifting performance. Those cable donuts or plastic sleeves are a good call, though. I reinforce that area of the bag with heavier fabric too.

    As far as stoves go.....

    Being a former outdoor shop manager and confessed gear dork, I have lots of different options for cooking up something warm.

    I typically use a solid fuel tablet stove when going light for a couple days in the Sierras. I'll also boil water over a fire sometimes to reduce fuel consumption.....K.I.S.S. I pack some tablets, a stove, and windscreen in my MSR Ti tea kettle. I like the size and capacity of this pot. I wouldn't want to pack anything wider.

    When I want more heat or speed, I'll pack a small canister stove and canister in my Ti kettle. Jet boils are cool, but I prefer my kettle and small stove over an integrated Jetboil, since I can still use my pot to boil water over a fire and extend my fuel supply.

    I like alcohol stoves for longer trips where you can resupply. Denatured alcohol is pretty easy to find on the road. Heet from the gas station works too. New innovations, like the Caldera Cone look promising, although more difficult to pack.

    I have a gas stove too. Great for busting out some gourmet sh!t, or when you need max heat and lots of fuel. Multi-fuel models are the ticket for international travel.

    When I'm touring technical singletrack, I carry my stove, pot, and food in my backpack. I keep this dense weight on my body, so that I can keep the bike nimble in technical terrain.

    My packing philosophy is that for technical riding, maximum efficiency is acheived with a greater percentage of your total pack weight on your back. I pack all the bulky light weight stuff in my bar and seat bag, and the stuff I want while riding in my frame bag. This allows me to still be able to bop and jive in the tech stuff.

    For less technical touring, I think maximum efficiency is acheived with most of the weight on your bike.

    Sometimes when I'm doing a tour and riding to the trailhead or linking up a few trails, I'll shift my weight distribution for different terrain along the way.

    YMMV


    Hope that helps.


    Here's a few pics of some other stuff coming out of the shop lately:

    This is a snack pack I made with plastic stiffeners in both sides and closed cell foam in the bottom to keep the contents from rattling around. I used a water-resistant zipper and lightweight Cordura. Its adaptable to a couple different mounting locations.

    sp1.jpg

    sp2.jpg

    This is a map case I made for a fella who is doing the GDR next year. It has a map window sized to fit an 8.5"X11" piece of paper folded lengthwise for his cue sheets. A thicker stiffener in the bottom with closed cell foam to eliminate rattling, and a light stiffener in the top so he can use a dry erase marker on the map window to record mileage adjustments. It measures 6"W X 12"L X 2"H. Dual water-resistant zip access, so you can open one side and grab a quick snack, or pull the whole flap back and fish around.

    mc1.jpg

    mc2.jpg

    I've been working on some other stuff too. Lots of time in the shop. Loving the wood stove.


    Peace on Dirt!

    Jeff
    Last edited by mountainboat; 12-26-2007 at 10:23 PM.
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  33. #33
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    Sweet dude. Keep it coming. I love the way you think!
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnfiend
    Sweet dude. Keep it coming. I love the way you think!
    Ask and you shall receive.....

    Here's a couple shots of some bags I made recently that will be journeying to their new home in the Lone Star state soon.....I wish you a long, adventurous life little bags.

    uno.jpg

    The bike is a buddy's old Ibis. We both started riding at about the same time 18 years ago. I'm going to build him a full set of bags and set his bike up so that I can drag him along on a few Summer trips. Likely a 3-speed rigid 69er conversion. I love building up complete bikes for ultralight touring and really looking at things as a system.

    This handlebar bag is 6" in diameter. The dual roll top closures allow you to change the length from around 13" to 20" for variable volume. I added a bellows pocket between the dual compression straps, and 2 stretch mesh pockets for a few energy bars or gels. The bag is made of lightweight Cordura with a heavier abrasion patch for protection from sharp stem and brake lever bits. This size represents what I think of as my General Issue size for 3-season ultralight bikepacking, in most climates. The bag will easily hold a 30 or 40 degree lightweight down bag and a tarp shelter or bivy sack. The zealots will go smaller, and some will want/need larger, but this size works well for most applications.

    dos.jpg

    tres.jpg

    This seat bag has a narrow taper near the post, for thigh clearance, and can be rolled down pretty far for getting behind the saddle when riding singletrack. The roll top allows you to vary the volume and, with the compression wings, really helps compress the bag nicely. The full lightweight Cordura construction is ready for some bushwacking.

    quatro.jpg

    With a seat and handlebar bag this size, along with a custom frame bag and a backpack with about 1000 cubic inches of capacity, I've found that I can carry everything I need for self supported wilderness style travel for 2-5 days, with temps down to about freezing.
    Last edited by mountainboat; 01-06-2008 at 11:33 PM.
    I sew stuff.

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  35. #35
    a.k.a. MTBMaven
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    Jeff,

    Would it be possible to get an itemized pack list for an average 2-5 day trip with more technical singletrack than fireroads? It would also be helpful to know where you put what items.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  36. #36
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    Also interested in that list.

    Jeff, what would those last two bags you have shown cost? That's pretty close to what I'm looking for.

    I sent you an email in case you missed it.

    Thanks.

  37. #37
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    So the bags in the above pictures were sent to me. I've been using them in my prep/training for the CTR this summer. I love the design and the fit. I fully admit it took an hour of fiddling with the front handlebar bag before I gave up and called Jeff. He walked me through the process of setting it up properly on the bike. Once he told me it was like a light clicked and I was like, "duh?" Very simple design yet so well thought out. For 2 day's out this is what I had in my bags:
    Front bag:
    Hammock, tarp, sleeping bag and my headlight in one stretch pocket, an Emergency blanket in another, and some gu's in another stretch pocket.
    Rear seat bag:
    stove (alcohol cat can stove), Ti kettle, pullover, some food
    Backpack
    food, water, longjohns, fleece hat, rain jacket

    Base weight of around 12 lbs not including food and water. I plan on doing a 2 1/2 day trip in Arkansas in a month or two with the set up. I'd just need to bring more food. I road witht this set up in Austin on very technical and steep terrain. I had no issues with balance and in never felt like the packs were swinging around. The rear seat pack does slightly swing but you can't feel it at all on the bike.
    Things I like about the packs:
    easily compressable/adjustable to fit your gear needs.
    very stable
    light
    durable...I don't worry about a rack breaking on me
    VERY well designed.

    Things I had small issues with:
    My hands were freezing cold in the morning so it was a pain to get everything strapped back together. Next time I'm just leaving it on there and stuffing the equipment back in.
    I had to adjust my brake levers a hair so they could be used properly. The bag was compressing the cables.
    On the super steep technical terrain where I had to get way back on the saddle I basically had to walk because the bag wasn't low enough, but to be honest it wouldn't matter what kind of set up you had. My chest was pretty much touching the seat.

    Overall, I would do it again and I don't think I'd change anything. The quality of craftsmanship was amazing. I highly recommend using these bags.

  38. #38
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    Thanks for the report. My frame and seat bag should arrive in about 3 hours according to Jeff. I'm pretty excited. First trip is this weekend. Again pretty excited.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  39. #39
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    so Fiend you geeked out and have spent the day playing with your new toys! Love it.

  40. #40
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    More Carousel Bags

    bump........

    Here is a short review of my 4 Carousel Bags

    http://desertmountainride.blogspot.c...ag-review.html

    love these bags.............
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by trail717; 05-30-2008 at 09:14 PM. Reason: add picture
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    me have blog

    forever lost in the desert, except when in the mountains

  41. #41
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    Thanks for the review.

    What pad/bag and bivy are you using? 2.4 lbs including the handlebar bag is very impressive for all that stuff!

  42. #42
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    I lied, its really 2.63lbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert_in_ca
    Thanks for the review.

    What pad/bag and bivy are you using? 2.4 lbs including the handlebar bag is very impressive for all that stuff!
    Opps I lied..........
    I re-weighed my kit, one item at a time, using an old postal scale, it is probably a bit more accurate than the digital bathroom scale I used when I had everything packed in the handlebar bag

    Bag, old style Montbell with out a zipper, tags & such removed , 21 oz
    Adventure Med Kits Bivy 7oz
    Pad(s) 5oz
    Handlebar bag 9oz

    42 oz total or 2.63 lbs

    picture here
    http://desertmountainride.blogspot.c...ep-system.html
    ---------------
    me have blog

    forever lost in the desert, except when in the mountains

  43. #43
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    That's pretty dang light. My Carousel bag (same as yours) weighs in at 4.2 lbs. I have an REI sub Kilo sleeping bag in it with my rain fly, rear blinkie (when I'm not wearing it), some earplugs, and my Princeton Tec LED headlight in it. It's a bit heavy on the technical singletrack, but handles just fine on dirt roads, doubletrack, mellow singletrack.

  44. #44
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    I'm dragging this one back from the dead. I was waiting for the rest of some gear to get here and now have everything I need. In the handlebar bag that Jeff made for me, I have a 45* down sleeping bag, bivy, bib shorts, jersey, and knee warmers. It's not that much stuff and I have the compression straps run as tight as they're gonna go. I run a Salsa 31.8 bar, with XT shifters and hydraulic discs and I am not able to get the 2 velcro straps to stay connected to the handlebar. It's very tight and if I push up on the bottom of the bag A LOT I can almost get it but the small amount of velcro that touches just isn't enough to hold. It looks like it would be fine if the velcro was about 2" longer. Just wondered if anyone else experienced this problem? I have a call in to Jeff to see if he can tell me what to do. I imagine I'll just have to take it somewhere and have them sew an extension on but I want to make sure they use strong enough thread and stitching that is Carousel worthy.

  45. #45
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    Just an update:

    Jeff left me a message and he knew exactly what was going on without even talking directly to me. I had the compression straps tightened before getting the bag secured to the bar. Made all the difference. Thanks again Jeff. Truly an amazing set of bags.

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