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  1. #1
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    The Hard COEre 100 (long, pics)

    For a while I’ve been <s>obsessed</s> fascinated by the idea of pulling off an unsupported 100-miler at <a href="https://coepark.gov">Henry Coe</a>: riding one giant, pure dirt loop, without repeats, out-and-backs or pavement. And so the <a href="https://www.hardcoere100.com/">Hard COEre 100</a> was born. A century at Coe means one can count on at least 20,000 feet of climbing, as the trails – a concoction of bumpy singletrack, steep firebreaks and jeep roads, half-overgrown game trails, rocky creek beds and old horse carriage trails – tend to go either up or down, at mostly unforgiving grades.

    I probed around a bit and found Ratpick and Plymmer – two of the strongest riders I know – prepared to share in the madness and line up with me for a 2AM start of this inaugural version. The evening before, my goal was to get at least a few hours of sleep in before the start, my main fear was not to hear my alarm and suffer rightful embarrassment. Carbo-loading by ingesting two IPA’s was just right to obtain both objectives, and would hopefully provide good energy for the ride as well.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2066.JPG"></img>
    The inaugural <s>loons</s> riders at the start
    </p>

    And so three souls lined up at the start – we’d be carrying more weight than usual (lights, batteries, warm riding gear, all our food), and it finally started to dawn upon me that the schedule and route that I had thought up in front of my computer was verging on the edge of madness, given what I thought my own capabilities were. But I quickly pushed the worries aside, I wanted to play and see, and just try to make the best of the curveballs that Coe would throw at us.

    A ride like this needed an appropriate warm-up, so what better way to start it than the slow grunt up Lyman-Willson trail with its 30% grade wall in the middle? The most memorable part of it turned out to be a skunk running along in front of us for a while, forcing us to opt for the steeper part of a short braid in the trail. After reaching Camp Willson we decided to not pause and push through to Willson Peak, climbing further up Steer Ridge. Unfortunately the moon had set already, as the nocturnal views from Steer Ridge would have been magical. Now the fun could really begin: the combo of singletrack descents Spike Jones / Timm was a total blast in the dark – my setup of helmet mounted incandescent light and bar mounted LED worked great and I hesitated only on the trickiest log rolls on Timm. Plymmer took out some snagging branches with his sheer enthusiasm, I believe.

    We were up for a 5 hour night ride, on its own already respectable, but I remembered this setup worked perfectly for almost 8 hours during the <a href="https://www.mtbguru.com/trip/show/3433-henry-coe-moonlight-madness-ride">Moonlight Madness ride</a>, so I didn’t worry too much about battery life. Alas, I should never trust anything using batteries, as I was about to find out.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2068.JPG"></img>
    Plymmer climbing out of Lost Spring trail, after ritual release of inner demons
    </p>

    Next up was a bit of Coit road, a bit of Anza (up, then down) and more Coit. Coit Spring / south Cross Canyon was the next notable climb, and at the crest we took our first real break. So far all was good, and we dived into Cross Canyon, a fast, furious descent. Then: my helmet light started to get dimmer and dimmer, and quickly failed entirely; another lesson learnt (test everything thoroughly and preferably right before you use it) but not a good spot and time to learn it, with Cross Canyon being among the most rocky, techy parts of the route. I still had my LED bar light of course, and it took some getting used to, and a few clumsy stumbles on the tricky dried out creek crossings, but it worked.

    We told ourselves to not bother trying to clean the hardest climbing sections on this ride (one of our normal passtimes on Coe rides) – though Ratpick in particular gave honest attempts on many of them – so the Cross Canyon Wall remained undefeated. Really hard to imagine it can be cleaned anyway these days, it is looking more rutted and loose than ever.

    A few gentle miles of Willow Ridge road were up next and then it was time to check up on <a href="https://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=657119">our recent trailwork</a> near Hoover Lake. I couldn’t enjoy it very much due to my challenges with illumination but it rode well – minus dabs on the early switchbacks but I’ll blame those on the darkness.

    In my current predicament I wasn’t particularly looking forward to Willow Ridge trail, a steep plunge on narrow, poison oak infested singletrack to Los Cruzeros, and I had to take it very slowly. But once we started the climb out of the Narrows on Lost Spring trail, dawn broke and my battery worries were over (for a while). Seeing the sun rise after a long night ride is always good for a decent morale boost, and I enjoyed the climb out towards the top of China Hole East. After Ratpick and I had crested the climb, we were upset by a loud, infernal grunt rising from the depths of the Narrows – the only thing this could signal was Plymmer not cleaning a climb. Coe cries every time Plymmer dabs!

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2069.JPG"></img>
    A rather awesome part of long night rides: witnessing the birth of another day
    </p>

    The descent into China Hole was fast and fun, and particularly nice in the fresh daylight. Next up was the, for Coe standards, easy, ‘family-oriented’ climb up China Hole West. After jointly dabbing on the toughest part of it, the first, elusive switchback, we slowly but surely dragged ourselves up Pine Ridge. The Manzanita Point fireroad leading to the park’s headquarters (HQ) had recently been graded (a mountain biker’s curse) and turned into a sandy mess in spots. The plan was to take it all the way up to HQ to refill on water and enjoy some other perks (full service bathrooms, instant coffee or hot chocolate for 25 cents!), which ment we would have to deviate a bit from the ‘rules’, as it implied a short out-and-back section, and even a very short stretch of pavement. But as it really falls in the noise overall (the out-and-back is about 0.6 miles), and it serves a clear purpose (water supply), we decided it was an acceptable exception (that’s the advantage if you make up the rules!).

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2078.JPG"></img>
    Plymmer needed some dusting after Ratpick was done with him here
    </p>

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2085.JPG"></img>
    A sea of fog rolling into the valley below
    </p>

    Our pace had been dropping throughout the ride, or rather, our breaks getting increasingly long and more frequent – and I knew it was going to be very hard to finish it in something resembling daylight, which was weighing a bit on me knowing my battery situation. But the coffee/chocolate at HQ was a godsend and got us all psyched up again for the goodness that was to follow: Flat Frog and Middle Ridge (ok, with some Hobbs-drudgery in between). Middle Ridge is of course about the finest singletrack descent one could dream up. I walked the steep climb at the beginning of it to save myself for what we’d get on our plate as soon as the downhill fun would have dried up.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2089.JPG"></img>
    The joys of Middle Ridge
    </p>

    So much fun just had to have a price. Poverty Flat would be the appetizer for what was to come: an unclimbable loose mess, an excursion towards the outer limits of what we were willing to put up with. Meanwhile it had started to warm up, and temperatures were definitely exceeding the 80F barrier of my comfort zone. The main course was Bear Mountain. Plymmer and I had stoked Ratpick – a Bear Mountain virgin – about it and I hope it delivered. The first stretch was a long hike-a-bike for the three of us, but it was impressive to see how Ratpick managed to clean a formidable section later on. It was clear that he had the best legs today; a climb like this doesn’t leave much doubt. But the mountain did get him in the end: he seemed to suffer a slow leak in the rear tire and needed to replace a tube. Myself, I think I ended up hiking almost half of its 4 mile overall length.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2095.JPG"></img>
    Bear Mountain: the Crusher of souls, the Obliterator of hope
    </p>

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2096.JPG"></img>
    Delivering on its evil promises
    </p>

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2098.JPG"></img>
    We pretty much looped around this lonely house-on-the-hill
    </p>

    Fortunately, Bear Mountain road does have an end, and we were relieved to zip down towards Mississippi lake along County Line road, on occasion staring into the Orestimba Wilderness on our left. It’s always a joy to see Mississippi Lake appear and after riding a fun stretch of singletrack around it we took a break and filtered some water. The next part of the route was the only one I hadn’t ridden before: a stretch of Willow Ridge road followed by a descent on Rat Spring trail – the Willow Ridge part seemed innocent enough on the map, a gradual climb followed by some ‘rollers’. But these rollers turned out to be a rather painful affair – ridiculously steep walls that were generally just a tad too long for me to power up through momentum – I was still in the process of recovering from Bear Mountain and felt beat down by the heat and now this. I suffered/hiked through them, but needed a long break at Pacheco Camp to regain my composure and some strength.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2106.JPG"></img>
    </p>

    But a worse thing was that we were now more than three hours behind schedule. I had tried to design the route so that leg 2 (which we just completed) and 3 were the hardest, and leg 4 easier and faster. Riding legs 3 and 4 was going to leave us with an ETA of at best 10pm. Given that I would have to rely on a wimpy bar LED, and Ratpick's and Plymmer’s lights may have had only one or two hours left, we made the hard decision to pull the plug on the whole route, skip leg 3 and finish by continuing with leg 4. It would still give us 80 miles with ~15,000 foot of climbing.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2111.JPG"></img>
    One of the many critters we encountered on our day out here
    </p>

    After eating a bit and employing my secret end-of-ride weapon (GU shots) I started to feel better again. The last part of the route was a bunch faster indeed and featured highlights such as the Kelly Lake trail (East) descent, the Dexter + Grizzly Gulch singletrack (great downhill!) and some exhilarating high-speed downhill fun on Wagon Road (speeds approaching 40mph). Plymmer started to look a little pale and we were afraid that he would decide to climb up Serpentine rather than stick to the route (yes, he’s one who would opt to climb more in order to feel better!), but our fear was fortunately ungrounded.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2112.JPG"></img>
    Catching some rain drops on the way home
    </p>

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2119.JPG"></img>
    Plymmer cresting the final climb on Wagon Road
    </p>

    It was very rewarding and great fun riding this in a small group, but there is a final, near-500 foot climb on Wagon right before the descent home, and my original intention was to propose to Plymmer and Ratpick to duke it out here, close to the very end, for the ‘win’. Of course that wasn’t relevant anymore, and Ratpick would have handily smoked us anyway, so I didn’t even bring it up. Hence we rolled together through Hunting Hollow right before sunset, around 6.15pm, back to the lot, to enjoy some post-ride festivities.

    Now, after letting things sink in for a few days, it is clear: we can't wait to get back out there and finish the job.

    More recaps in the <a href="https://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=651437">Norcal thread</a> and on the <a href="https://www.hardcoere100.com/results.html">HC100 site</a>.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/CIMG2123.JPG"></img>
    </p>

  2. #2
    It's carbon dontcha know.
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    Awesome, love it.

    I've tried myself to do self organised 100's and it's amazing how the time can vanish through the day compared to racing in a NUE.

  3. #3
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    Congrats on the formation of a new "Undie Hundie" I see a trend forming with these......

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6thElement
    Awesome, love it.

    I've tried myself to do self organised 100's and it's amazing how the time can vanish through the day compared to racing in a NUE.
    Yes, in those I typically end up with ~30min or less 'stopped time'... here I was a bit shell shocked to find out it was 4 hours. Where did those hours go? Perhaps some of the slow hike-a-bike was registered by the GPS as 'stopped' but still...

  5. #5
    BBW
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    it looks amazing.. such a nice views!!!
    Did you guys have a place to get water or did you do it with just what you could carry with you?
    BBW. MS, RD

  6. #6
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    We did something similar to this last year in Pisgah. One person finished, the rest of us were nearly destroyed by it. Good times.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBW
    it looks amazing.. such a nice views!!!
    Did you guys have a place to get water or did you do it with just what you could carry with you?
    There are two spots on the route with a reliable supply of clean drinking water (HQ, at mile 33 and Dowdy Ranch, at mile 80) so technically it could work with a bottle + hydration pack or so.

    However, temps were a bit on the warm side (>80F) and we all carried filters as well since there are a few lakes and springs along the way.

  8. #8
    BBW
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre
    There are two spots on the route with a reliable supply of clean drinking water (HQ, at mile 33 and Dowdy Ranch, at mile 80) so technically it could work with a bottle + hydration pack or so.

    However, temps were a bit on the warm side (>80F) and we all carried filters as well since there are a few lakes and springs along the way.
    Oh nice!!! could you tell me what filters do you use?? That's interesting!!
    BBW. MS, RD

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBW
    Oh nice!!! could you tell me what filters do you use?? That's interesting!!
    I was using a Katadyne bottle-with-built-in filter (used to be called XStream, now it's MyBottle Purifier I believe), the other two had a lightweight Katadyne and MSR filter (typically used by backpackers).

  10. #10
    BBW
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre
    I was using a Katadyne bottle-with-built-in filter (used to be called XStream, now it's MyBottle Purifier I believe), the other two had a lightweight Katadyne and MSR filter (typically used by backpackers).
    I checked them out, that is one good idea!! thanks I'm going to get one!!
    Cheers
    BBW. MS, RD

  11. #11
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    thanks for that ElHombre! Awesome write up, pics and a job well done. I sorely miss Coe, used to provide on demand suffering regularly when I lived in the bay area. Having nearly drowned there once trying to cross a raging floodwater in a box canyon for some reason left indelible marks Everything at Coe is turned to 11, and your adventure sure captured that well.

  12. #12
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    Part II

    No one finished it the first time around, but we couldn't wait until next year to try again, so:

    <p align="center"><a href="www.hardcoere100.com"><img border="2" src="https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100/HC100bisFlyer_sm.jpg"></img></a>
    </p>
    (short fuse as the meteorological window of opportunity is closing)

  13. #13
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  14. #14
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    Thanks EBRider, I think I'm still on a high from it. Below I reposted my recap from that thread (make sure to check it out for Ratpick's and Plymmer's version of the facts). Not sure I'll ride it again, but I want to host it next year (either early June or mid- to late September should fit the bill) and see some sub 16 hour times .

    Where to start... after last month's attempt we had learned a few things, about batteries, nutrition, gear. But we would also lose almost an hour worth of daylight. The day that presented itself was promising to be an ideal opportunity though: sunny with high temperatures in the 70's, with trails turned uber-tacky by previous rains and now dried out to perfection. So I put my excuses aside and lined up with Ratpick and Plymmer on Friday just before midnight on a frighteningly frigid Hunting Hollow parking lot, where temperatures had dropped to a not-too-balmy 37F... I had no idea how we would fare, but was trusting on our collective bull-headedness to pull us through.

    On such cold and dark night (the moon had set a while ago), climbing Lyman-Willson was a great way to get the blood flowing and we slowly started to warm up. The ridges were again much warmer than the canyon floors, with their pockets of seemingly arctic air stuck to the surface. On Steer Ridge we had our first noteworthy wildlife encounter: a skunk was running along in front of us, sticking to the trail rather than just moving to the side (the same, not-too-bright skunk of last time?). I lost my patience, launched into a sprint and successfully completed a 'safe' pass. This must have ticked it off a bit and poor Ratpick was to pay the price, as he got sprayed by the cantankerous creature. Luckily for us, he managed to avoid most of it, though the unsavory aroma would accompany him for a while.

    Descending Spike Jones and Timm in the dark was loads of fun again, I can highly recommend it. No trace of mountain kitties, though Ratpick did spot a bobcat. We slowly made our way up to the top of Cross Canyon, then more fun ensued with the high speed descent and traverse through the canyon floor. The bottom was frosty and humid, and the slippery mess of vegetation and wet rocks made it a precarious and slow ride. We all failed miserably on the Cross Canyon Wall but didn't really do an honest effort - saving our breath and legs would be the motto today. During the climb out, Plymmer got held up a bit, and Ratpick and myself were to witness Plymmer's extraordinary self-motivational skills again - the ungodly screams rising out of the depths of the canyon must have sounded terrifying to the untrained ear, but we knew better.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100b/CIMG2316.JPG"></img>
    Twilight of the new day
    </p>

    Willow Ridge road was next, then Hoover Lake trail. By means of contribution to the trail work day, we left rock cairns indicating where rework was needed (more seriously: it seems you must have done a great job cleaning it up, Sorcerer and co, thanks!). Last time around I was rather miserable on the Willow Ridge singletrack descent, with my dead battery and wimpy bar LED - not so today, all was well in the battery department and the plunge into the Narrows was a blast. After the climb on Lost Spring trail, the descent then ascent of China Hole we started to tire a bit of the nightriding, and were looking forward to dawn, which we were able to witness in all its glory on our way to Headquarters. We arrived there pretty much on schedule, but unfortunately the schedule didn't involve waiting around for HQ to open up so that we could storm the coffee machine inside. No coffee for us today, but that was fine, we had Flat Frog and Middle Ridge to look forward to, not a bad way to start the day.

    Everything looked glorious in the early morning light and I was flying down Middle Ridge - on one occasion, a bit all too literally, as my handlebar clipped a tree and bike and pilot got launched off trail. Fortunately, no real harm was done (except to the mount of my bar LED). I guess this was the first time I was having some second thoughts after having installed a wider bar and bar ends. Ratpick also had a minor stumble, but we were fortunate that in terms of incidents this was all we would encounter today - no other crashes or bad mechanicals (my main fear for the day) were to be reported.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100b/CIMG2325.JPG"></img>
    Zipping down Middle Ridge
    </p>

    Crossing the creek at Poverty Flat Camp we started to feel the impending doom of Bear Mountain, but we first we needed to deal with its little cousin: Poverty Flat road. The recent rain has been a godsend - it turned the unclimbable mess of moondust into a nice firm tacky surface and I think I haven't seen it in any better conditions yet. On our left, we saw some smoldering remains of the controlled burn that recently took place in the Blue Ridge zone. At this point, we'd done over 40 miles and were close to having climbed 10k feet, but we still felt in decent shape - I tried to ignore the fact that we'd just done a six hour night ride and imagined we were instead just starting out our ride on this bright sunny morning. More mind games were going to be needed to pull this off, I figured. As we knew from past experience, our paces were pretty well matched, and it certainly helped to have someone to complain to when needed close to you.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100b/CIMG2348.JPG"></img>
    Plymmer on North Fork trail
    </p>

    The big one was up next: Bear Mountain. I felt better than last time and attacked the lower section with some amount of success. Of course, all resistance was futile once we got to that ludicrous 40% section. Ratpick was a beast again and cleaned more than I thought possible or advisable. After the seemingly endless sequence of false summits, we finally made it to the top; meanwhile things had been nicely warming up and we could finally strip some layers and bask in the sun a bit. We had a few 'easy' miles to look forward to then, the descent to and circumnavigation of Mississippi Lake. A bit of climbing on Willow Ridge road got us to the top of Heritage: a bumpy descent leading to the even bumpier, pothole-ridden upper Pacheco Creek trail. I was not in a happy place on my hardtail here, and upped the pace, looking forward to get it over with quickly and to some rest and repose at Pacheco Camp. We rolled into camp almost exactly at noon.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100b/CIMG2359.JPG"></img>
    Dragging ourselves out of the bowels of Coe</p>

    I considered beforehand the third part of the course, which was up next, to be the make-it-or-break-it part. It's a deep excursion into the backcountry, and even on a 'normal' ride not for the faint of heart. But by now the miles had started to weigh real heavy, and we entered deep into our respective pain caves. To describe the horrors Kaiser-Aetna ('a mile and a half of hell'?) or Center Flats road inflicted at this stage of the ride is difficult, it's something to experience rather than explain. But the payoff is we got to ride incredible and unique gems of singletrack (Dutch's trail: undiluted awesomeness! That superfast downhill stretch of Burra Burra!), in the middle of nowhere, the trails all for ourselves. On Dutch's I even retrieved a water bottle (one with an integrated filter) that I lost there some time last August.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100b/CIMG2365.JPG"></img>
    Sunset</p>

    Not surprisingly, our pace had been dropping a lot, and on this short November day we were soon going to embark on part two of our night ride. We had planned for this and made sure we had plenty of battery juice. After we had dragged ourselves off of Center Flats road, we witnessed a spectacular sunset on Wagon road, and hooked up our lights (and warm gear) again. The last 20 mile leg of the route had been designed to be a bit faster and easier, though that was all highly relative at this point. The Kelly Lake trail descent in the dark was certainly fast and fun, just as Dexter/Grizzly Gulch trail, a wonderful combination. Then there were a bunch of slow fireroad grinds (Crest road, Coit road from Kelly Lake, Grizzly Gulch road/Wagon towards Camp Willson) that certainly felt easier than the earlier butchery on Center Flats and its likes.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100b/CIMG2370.JPG"></img>
    Quite a spectacle
    </p>

    To add mileage to the route (and ensure a clean 100 as per the official Coe map), I had included a slight detour off of Camp Willson in the end, featuring sections of Vasquez and Long Dam trails, and I hadn't bothered to preride them. Plymmer and Ratpick gave me a disparaging look once we had regrouped at Camp Willson, and I was unsure why. As soon as they sent me ahead down Vasquez I understood. The downhill part is horribly rutted, the short climb out vicious, and the descent down Long Dam most possibly the worst trail I have ever laid wheels on (basketball sized potholes, ruts and ditches are literally all over the place). But in a way, I guess it's not unfitting for a 'hard' Coe ride.

    Even though we were plodding around like zombies now, I was getting quite excited, knowing that we had it almost in the bag. The last-but-not-least hurdle however was a 500ft climb on Wagon road. A smooth fireroad, but the bottom part sports a sustained 18% section and I had to use all my willpower to refrain from dabbing and ditching the bike - having Ratpick climb next to me helped to ease the pain and at last we made it to the top. I must have fallen half asleep, as I missed the spectacular meteorite that Ratpick and Plymmer were gazing at (I did see a smaller one earlier on).

    The fast and furious final descent down Wagon road upped the adrenaline level again, and we stormed back home through a frosty Hunting Hollow road to claim our 100 miler, which had taken us a grand total of 21 hours, 12 minutes and 58 seconds, with just over 20,100 feet climbed (moving time 15 hours 22 minutes). It may seem like we took our time for this 'group ITT', but it certainly didn't feel like that.

    We were pleasantly surprised to see a welcome committee on the parking lot, which we highly appreciated, thanks Sorcerer and Knobs! Some numbers needed rounding up (damn GPS receivers), so after a bit of bonus riding we were finally able to enjoy the festivities while staving off onset of hypothermia. Best - and hardest - ride ever! Thanks Ratpick and Plymmer for sharing in the madness. Next year, I'd love to see some strong riders show up and shatter our time; after all, if we can do it, why not you?

    P.S. Ride stats and many more photos here. More on the the Hard COEre 100 website as well when I get a chance.

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100b/CIMG2378.JPG"></img>
    Three <s>zombies</s> Hard COEre 100 finishers
    </p>

    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100b/CIMG2375.JPG"></img>
    Sorcerer from the Welcome Committee
    </p>
    <p align="center"><img border="2" src=" https://californication.mtbguru.com/pics/HardCOEre100b/CIMG2376.JPG"></img>
    Knobs from the Welcome Committee
    </p>

  15. #15
    My other ride is your mom
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    nice work and writeup!




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