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  1. #1
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    New question here. Di2 gears for 24 hour racing.

    I'd like to know if anyone here has experience with the Shimano Di2 gears for 24 hour racing, or any kind of mtb racing? The bike I'm looking at getting, a Cannondale FSI 1, comes with Di2, and one or two 24 hour races a season is usually my main target.

    I have Di2 on my road bike an absolutely love the performance of it, and it's never let me down on a ride (apart from once or twice when the battery was running low due to me not charging it on time) . My only concern on the mtb is that a lot of racing over here is often very wet or muddy.

    Any opinions (even if you have never used Di2) would be greatly appreciated!

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    I've used it for the past two seasons and would put it on every bike i have if i had that budget. Wet and mud are where it shines (no more gummed up cables). Have both 1x (full squish) and 2x (hardtail).

    anything specific you're after?

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    Wet and muddy seems like where Di2 would excel, since it doesn't have to depend on spring tension.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walt Disney's Frozen Head View Post
    I've used it for the past two seasons and would put it on every bike i have if i had that budget. Wet and mud are where it shines (no more gummed up cables). Have both 1x (full squish) and 2x (hardtail).

    anything specific you're after?
    Thanks. Actually, racing in mud is one of my main concerns, over long duration races. I'm guessing that the mech will move even when the cassette and chain are starting to get clogged up with mud, which in my mind could lead to risk of the chain snapping. But - I've been using Di2 on the road for over 2 years now and no problems like that.

    Have you used it for 24 hour solo races?

    I would be on 1X hardtail (Cannondale FSI 1).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Damitletsride! View Post
    Thanks. Actually, racing in mud is one of my main concerns, over long duration races. I'm guessing that the mech will move even when the cassette and chain are starting to get clogged up with mud, which in my mind could lead to risk of the chain snapping. But - I've been using Di2 on the road for over 2 years now and no problems like that.

    Have you used it for 24 hour solo races?

    I would be on 1X hardtail (Cannondale FSI 1).
    Yes! but I'm in the Rocky Mtn/Western US and we don't get much mud and if we do we're often not racing. Wettest was probably Breck 100 last year and the drivetrain didn't have any issues - I did though

    My buddy (the guy we all know who breaks everything) has had trouble with di2 in cx due to mud and the derailleur bending his hangar - or at least that's the story. I'm always skeptical whenever something of his breaks as to the actual cause but it sort of makes sense. Cassette all gummed up, chain all gummed up and the thing not really wanting to shift but the derailleur moves... I could see it happening but I'm also pretty sure it wouldn't happen to most other people

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    Just bumping this up to see if anyone else can add... or if anyone can input experience from stage racing and general marathon racing too. I think they would perform well in mud from what I've read, the only concern being if you had a crash that the wire could get damaged and end the rest of your race?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Damitletsride! View Post
    Just bumping this up to see if anyone else can add... or if anyone can input experience from stage racing and general marathon racing too. I think they would perform well in mud from what I've read, the only concern being if you had a crash that the wire could get damaged and end the rest of your race?
    If something did manage to catch that four inches of exposed wire, it would probably just unplug it from the derailleur. If something caught a cable, it wouldn't give way and would transfer all that force to the derailleur and the hanger.

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    I don't have Di2 experience, but my SRAM eTap WiFli derailleur has a force sensor that prevents it from shifting if the shift effort is too high. I'd be amazed if Shimano didn't do the same thing. So, you might get a no shift if the works are too gummed up, rather than a shift that smokes a der hangar or rips the der off the bike. Cable related issues are solved though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by richde View Post
    If something did manage to catch that four inches of exposed wire, it would probably just unplug it from the derailleur. If something caught a cable, it wouldn't give way and would transfer all that force to the derailleur and the hanger.
    Not sure what are you trying to say? I'm pretty sure a mech hanger is a lot easier for my pit crew to change than a wire (I'm guessing if the wire got pulled there's a good chance it would tear or rip and would not be as easy as pushing it back in).

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    Quote Originally Posted by solo-x View Post
    I don't have Di2 experience, but my SRAM eTap WiFli derailleur has a force sensor that prevents it from shifting if the shift effort is too high. I'd be amazed if Shimano didn't do the same thing. So, you might get a no shift if the works are too gummed up, rather than a shift that smokes a der hangar or rips the der off the bike. Cable related issues are solved though.
    I'm interested to know more! Do you have to upgrade aftermarket? I don't see any 2019 Cannondale bikes stocked with that anyway :-( .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Damitletsride! View Post
    I'm interested to know more! Do you have to upgrade aftermarket? I don't see any 2019 Cannondale bikes stocked with that anyway :-( .
    SRAM doesn't have e-shifting for mountain yet. My point is that I don't think Di2 will shift if shift effort is too high, so you don't have to worry about it bending a der hangar or forcing a shift like you can with cable shifting.

  12. #12
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    ive used DI2 on my hardtail for some endurance stuff - Marji Gescik last year for example. my own multi day stuff. love it. you need to make sure you know where you are up to batery wise but itsbeen great. i have disconnected one cable in a crash - which i reconnected and all good...the derailleur is pretty bomber (touch wood!) and there are soem safety features built in - it moves inboard in a serious knock situation. and yes - once you arer used to DI2 shifting it is hard to go back even to cable xtr! so crisp!

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    I don't have the budget for di2, but one of my primary riding buddies has it. We've been riding together multiple times a week for the last couple years and the only time I've ever seen it "fail" a stick unplugged the wire from the derailleur. He plugged it back in and off we went. For reference, he's the guy who always takes on the deepest creek crossings and "creates" his own trail through loose sticks etc. Never seen him have issues with water or mud.

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    Quote Originally Posted by notso View Post
    I don't have the budget for di2, but one of my primary riding buddies has it. We've been riding together multiple times a week for the last couple years and the only time I've ever seen it "fail" a stick unplugged the wire from the derailleur. He plugged it back in and off we went. For reference, he's the guy who always takes on the deepest creek crossings and "creates" his own trail through loose sticks etc. Never seen him have issues with water or mud.
    I'm that guy and I use di2 as well .

    I do keep a spare 1400mm wire wrapped up with a piece of velcro strip, and shoved inside my handlebar. I can just detach the grip and have a replacement + velcro to attach it in the case of a clipped wire. Also, I secure the wire on the derailleur with an additional zip tie (there is a spot near where it plugs in for this, not immediately obvious)

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    Quote Originally Posted by newportl View Post
    ... Also, I secure the wire on the derailleur with an additional zip tie (there is a spot near where it plugs in for this, not immediately obvious)
    I saw what I think you're talking about and was going to do something similar. But... my thought process was that I'd rather have the thing come unplugged easily (and not ruin the wire) than brake and try to route a wire (internal routing) somewhere out on the trail. Not implying your choice is bad at all. Now on my trail bike (external routing) no big deal to do that. something to think about?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Walt Disney's Frozen Head View Post
    I saw what I think you're talking about and was going to do something similar. But... my thought process was that I'd rather have the thing come unplugged easily (and not ruin the wire) than brake and try to route a wire (internal routing) somewhere out on the trail. Not implying your choice is bad at all. Now on my trail bike (external routing) no big deal to do that. something to think about?
    I agree. My thought with the spare wire and velcro is that i'd just run it all external if needed, from the junction box to the der (assuming the der wire is the one that got cut/damaged).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Damitletsride! View Post
    Not sure what are you trying to say? I'm pretty sure a mech hanger is a lot easier for my pit crew to change than a wire (I'm guessing if the wire got pulled there's a good chance it would tear or rip and would not be as easy as pushing it back in).
    That it's not an issue?

    The wire pops in and out easily, you shouldn't make pulling on the wire a habit, but it's not going to explode if it happens once and a while.

  18. #18
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    One thing I've observed however, is that the ratios on the XT cassette aren't nearly as user friendly or as nice as the ratios on SRAM. I actually almost forgot I had a bike with XT mechanical last year (I used my one with SRAM more), and while the shifting was smooth, there was a huge jump from the 2nd lowest gear to the lowest gear.

    I have Di2 on my road bike and have barely had to touch it in 3 years apart from charging the battery and changing the cassette and chain, it really if fit and forget, but not sure I like the XT cassette.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Damitletsride! View Post
    One thing I've observed however, is that the ratios on the XT cassette aren't nearly as user friendly or as nice as the ratios on SRAM. I actually almost forgot I had a bike with XT mechanical last year (I used my one with SRAM more), and while the shifting was smooth, there was a huge jump from the 2nd lowest gear to the lowest gear.

    I have Di2 on my road bike and have barely had to touch it in 3 years apart from charging the battery and changing the cassette and chain, it really if fit and forget, but not sure I like the XT cassette.
    Which one, the 42 or the 46?

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    Quote Originally Posted by richde View Post
    Which one, the 42 or the 46?
    I can't speak for him but my $s on the 46. It's a rather large jump but not that big of a deal (IMO).

    I love the 11-40 for whatever that's worth.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by richde View Post
    Which one, the 42 or the 46?
    The 42.

    It was noticeable enough when having two bikes for 24 hour racing, one with Shimano and one with Sram. Both very smooth shifting but I don't understand why Shimano have that jump between the last two gears.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Damitletsride! View Post
    The 42.

    It was noticeable enough when having two bikes for 24 hour racing, one with Shimano and one with Sram. Both very smooth shifting but I don't understand why Shimano have that jump between the last two gears.
    I don't think you're remembering correctly but you're definitely entitled to your opinion. The googles says the 11-42 goes like this:
    11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-37-42

    where the sram:
    10-12-14-16-18-21-24-28-32-36-42



    the 11-46
    11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-37-46
    Last edited by Walt Disney's Frozen Head; 08-22-2018 at 11:01 AM. Reason: bad paste format :(

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    Quote Originally Posted by Walt Disney's Frozen Head View Post
    I don't think you're remembering correctly but you're definitely entitled to your opinion. The googles says the 11-42 goes like this:
    11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-37-42

    where the sram:
    10-12-14-16-18-21-24-28-32-36-42



    the 11-46
    11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-37-46
    I figured it was the 46 for just that reason. I was surprised that Shimano even created that cassette, because it seems like one of those occasions where the customer is very, very, wrong.

    Never really been able to tell the difference between SRAM and Shimano 42t cassettes.

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