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Thread: Chequamegon 100

  1. #1
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    Chequamegon 100



    This will be my first 100 mile MTB race ever. Last season I was racing around the 50 mile range of races (mostly singletrack, not a lot of gravel or roads in them).I’ve been putting the time in on the trainer and getting outside whenever it is safe (live in Minnesota).I’ve been putting in at least 11 hours a week.I also just ordered the MTB Training Bible.


    Does anyone have any advice for training leading up to this event? Or how you handled nutrition or water during the race?


    I built up a “road” wheelset for my race bike so I can get hours on the bike without it needing to be on singletrack (last year I rode only singletrack and I barely finished the season because of fatigue injuries), but I can still maintain the body position and q factor I’ll be racing.


    I am also going to try to not use a pack, I have a super nice Osprey one but I just don’t like having them on for over 4-5 hours. My bike can hold 2 bottles I of course have my tools and flat kit in a small seat bag(just big enough to cram everything in there) and I also purchased 3 “Mutherload Straps” and a “Super 8 Top Tube Mount” to hold more bottles and supplies.


    One of my sponsors is Skratch, so I’mgoing to try to use their products during the race but if there is something better out there I’m all ears!


    I’ll also be using a Garmin 520 with speed and cadence sensors.


    Thanks for the help!

  2. #2
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    I've done this race twice before, and I'm signed up to do it again this year. It's an awesome event with great trails and it draws a good mix of people. Last year I did it on my fatbike in full-fat form. In terms of preparing - make sure that you're comfortable on your bike for long periods of time. Get saddle time in. Do a few 4+ hour rides before hand to make sure nothing is really bothering you. If your hands hurt or your butt hurts or your neck hurts after 4 hours, just imagine that after 8 or 9.

    In terms of nutrition - I would recommend 100% taking advantage of the drop bag opportunity. Put together a drop bag and use it. Put some feel-good things in there (I like salted nut bars) and food that you could eat even when you don't have an appetite. Two years ago it was very hot. Last year it was a good temperature - but we got rained towards the end. The weather is very sporadic. Also, there are a lot of mosquitos in the forest.

    The only way to know what an endurance race will be like is to do it, really. Don't go out too hard, and don't burn too many matches too early. You'll probably end up riding with people for most of it - rather than alone. The Garmin 520 should be able to make it the whole time, just turn down the brightness. Otherwise you could use a small external battery to plug into it while it's in use (I've done this for some of the 13+ hour events I've done). I noticed that having devices such as an HRM will drain it a bit faster.

    The Chequamegon 100 is an awesome race and you're going to have a good time. One of the added benefits is that you won't need a light - since it's close to the summer solstice and pretty far north. The sun is up for like 18+ hours. Fuel yourself with what works; refill your water at every opportunity (there's water at the drop bag location); add some goodies to your drop bag; make your bike fast and comfortable.
    Fatbikes tho

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by beluga_ciabatta View Post
    I've done this race twice before, and I'm signed up to do it again this year. It's an awesome event with great trails and it draws a good mix of people. Last year I did it on my fatbike in full-fat form. In terms of preparing - make sure that you're comfortable on your bike for long periods of time. Get saddle time in. Do a few 4+ hour rides before hand to make sure nothing is really bothering you. If your hands hurt or your butt hurts or your neck hurts after 4 hours, just imagine that after 8 or 9.

    In terms of nutrition - I would recommend 100% taking advantage of the drop bag opportunity. Put together a drop bag and use it. Put some feel-good things in there (I like salted nut bars) and food that you could eat even when you don't have an appetite. Two years ago it was very hot. Last year it was a good temperature - but we got rained towards the end. The weather is very sporadic. Also, there are a lot of mosquitos in the forest.

    The only way to know what an endurance race will be like is to do it, really. Don't go out too hard, and don't burn too many matches too early. You'll probably end up riding with people for most of it - rather than alone. The Garmin 520 should be able to make it the whole time, just turn down the brightness. Otherwise you could use a small external battery to plug into it while it's in use (I've done this for some of the 13+ hour events I've done). I noticed that having devices such as an HRM will drain it a bit faster.

    The Chequamegon 100 is an awesome race and you're going to have a good time. One of the added benefits is that you won't need a light - since it's close to the summer solstice and pretty far north. The sun is up for like 18+ hours. Fuel yourself with what works; refill your water at every opportunity (there's water at the drop bag location); add some goodies to your drop bag; make your bike fast and comfortable.
    Thank you! That's great about the fat bike, I built my own fully custom plus bike that comes in at 23lbs with a lauf and other "comfort" additions for racing this year and plan on riding that.
    Was there quite a few people riding with only water bottles, or did most people have a camelback?

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    Quote Originally Posted by eyeluvdirt View Post
    Thank you! That's great about the fat bike, I built my own fully custom plus bike that comes in at 23lbs with a lauf and other "comfort" additions for racing this year and plan on riding that.
    Was there quite a few people riding with only water bottles, or did most people have a camelback?
    Two years ago I did it with two bottles and a 80 oz osprey pack. Last year I did it with two bottles and a framebag with a 70oz hydration bladder. I don't think you'd want to attempt it with just two bottles. It's going to be hot and humid and likely a 10+ hour event and it's very remote and there are pretty big gaps in areas to get safe water. As you can see by the pic from their site

    https://gallery.mailchimp.com/54ff81...03187f929a.jpg

    Most dudes are running a pack. Also, don't run those triathlon under-seat bottle cages - those just pollute the trail and/or donate bottles to other people (I can almost guarantee that you'd eject your bottles with those).
    Fatbikes tho

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    Quote Originally Posted by beluga_ciabatta View Post
    Two years ago I did it with two bottles and a 80 oz osprey pack. Last year I did it with two bottles and a framebag with a 70oz hydration bladder. I don't think you'd want to attempt it with just two bottles. It's going to be hot and humid and likely a 10+ hour event and it's very remote and there are pretty big gaps in areas to get safe water. As you can see by the pic from their site

    https://gallery.mailchimp.com/54ff81...03187f929a.jpg

    Most dudes are running a pack. Also, don't run those triathlon under-seat bottle cages - those just pollute the trail and/or donate bottles to other people (I can almost guarantee that you'd eject your bottles with those).
    Ok, sounds good. My family is from the Hayward area and I've done a lot of riding up there which is why I'm so concerned with the water portion haha! My plan was two bottle cages, using the super 8 to hold one under the top tube bar and some sort of bladder somewhere

    Thanks!

  6. #6
    viva la v-brakes!
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    I'm definitely all-for trying to get weight off your back. However, during endurance races its especially important that you don't get dehydrated since its hard to come back from that. Drinking from bottles only on a race that is 90%+ singletrack makes it hard to stay hydrated.

    That and, there are some big stretches at the Cheq 100 between spots to refill... 30 miles between the town hall and the fish hatchery? I don't recall exactly. I think what I did was 70oz on my back and a 28oz bottle and I ran out before getting to the fish hatchery, I had to go off-course to refill the camelback. That said, I drink 30-50% more than most people since I sweat a lot.

    I typically wear a camelback but carry only water weight on my back, my tools and food are in a frame bag or feed bag (this year I'm trying a storage container mounted under my down tube).

    If you really want to try a bottles only approach, you could pick up one or two feed bags like these Revelates and test how how long you can ride at a race pace with 3 or 4 bottles, and compare that to a conservative measure of how long it will take you to get between the longest stretches between aid stations on the Cheq.
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    Thanks fishman. The more I think about it and talk to people who have done the race the more I think I will do the water only in the bag and store the rest of the weight (tools, spare,etc etc) on the bike. I have the Osperey Raptor 10 so I can carry 100oz in that and I think the shape of the pack will actually be more comfortable over 10+ hours than the smaller ones that can a similar amount of water.
    I have 2 bottle cages and believe I'm pretty average on going through water. So I think 2x 24oz bottle plus 100oz on the back should be good. But I also have a Super-8 bottle holder I can strap to the frame somewhere too....
    I have a fuel tank to hold my food with easy access since it would take away my rear pockets also. As much as I would rather have pockets available, I think you are right about putting surviving first (hydration).

  8. #8
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    How much vert in this race?

  9. #9
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    I show 5k of vert last year. The winner was only caring 2 bottles. I had a 50oz pack and two bottles and never ran out of fluids. I did fill up the pack at the stop. And to be honest, I don't remember if I topped off my bottles at the same time. Spare tube was strapped to the top tube, tools under the seat, food in my pockets. I did lose a lot of time in the last 10 miles. Something in the air caused my eyes to have an allergic reaction. They were crusted shut by the time I reached the finish line. It was like riding underwater. This happened once before at Cohutta which was also a hot humid day. I carry eye drops now and try to remember to put them in. One of the riders up front had to stop on the side of the trail and sit down. I asked him after what happened and he just said he threw up and sat there for a few minutes then got up and finished! Fun race and sorry that I'll miss it this year.
    Chequamegon 100-cheq-100.png

  10. #10
    I am Walt
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    Quote Originally Posted by eyeluvdirt View Post
    I am also going to try to not use a pack, I have a super nice Osprey one but I just don’t like having them on for over 4-5 hours. My bike can hold 2 bottles I of course have my tools and flat kit in a small seat bag(just big enough to cram everything in there) and I also purchased 3 “Mutherload Straps” and a “Super 8 Top Tube Mount” to hold more bottles and supplies.
    I have a couple nice Osprey packs, and like them, but I recently moved all of my gear into small packs or bags on the frame, trying to get as much weight as possible off my back. I have tried doing all bottles for long rides/races, but have found I don't drink enough without the ability to consistently sip from a drinking tube. I am in the process of looking for a very minimalist pack with a 2-3L bladder to wear.

    Quote Originally Posted by eyeluvdirt View Post
    I’ll also be using a Garmin 520 with speed and cadence sensors.
    I used a 520 at a recent 24-hour race, and with the backlight set to the minimum and using the HR tracking, I got 14 1/2 hours of battery life, which I thought was pretty good. The speed and cadence sensors may knock that down a bit.
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    Quote Originally Posted by waltaz View Post
    ...I am in the process of looking for a very minimalist pack with a 2-3L bladder to wear.


    I used a 520 at a recent 24-hour race, and with the backlight set to the minimum and using the HR tracking, I got 14 1/2 hours of battery life, which I thought was pretty good. The speed and cadence sensors may knock that down a bit.
    If you find any good minimalist packs that hold 3 liters let me know. I’ve looked but most of them top out at 2-2.5liters and they have very thin uncomfortable looking straps.The Raptor 10 is one of the smaller “all day” bags that Osprey makes that holds a 3 liter bladder and they are really well designed to contour the back appropriately.Might be worth the quarter to half a pound extra of material if it sits on the back better? Idk?

    I’m thinking my finishing time should be between 10-11 hours for this race, so hopefully it will be fine then with the speed and cadence.
    I’ve been charging it weekly and it still has quite a bit of juice left and my training is averaging around 11 hours a week at the moment, but some of that is on a trainer or weight lifting still.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by eyeluvdirt View Post
    [FONT="Calibri"]If you find any good minimalist packs that hold 3 liters let me know. I’ve looked but most of them top out at 2-2.5liters and they have very thin uncomfortable looking straps.The Raptor 10 is one of the smaller “all day” bags that Osprey makes that holds a 3 liter bladder and they are really well designed to contour the back appropriately.[COLOR=#000000]Might be worth the quarter to half a pound extra of material if it sits on the back better? Idk?
    There's a thread on this that just started in this forum, and also in the Nutrition/Hydration forum. Check em out...
    Ride more; post less...

  13. #13
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    What is the terrain like up in these parts? 5k' of climbing sounds pretty doable for a first 100 miler. If the terrain isn't super techy then it sounds like the only real hurdle is limited SAG stations?

  14. #14
    viva la v-brakes!
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    It’s a lot of up and down, but nothing too long and nothing too steep. Pretty well suited to a single speed.


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