Best Stage Race in South America?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    77

    Best Stage Race in South America?

    It has been my goal during the last 3 years to do one stage race per year and so far I have completed Cape Epic, Transalp and Breck Epic. I am looking at South America now and from what I've heard it seems to boil down to Brazil Ride, Transandes in Chile, and Leyenda del Dorado in Colombia. Has anyone done any of the 3?....which would you recommend the most?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: slimphatty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    742
    No clue and you're a ****ing beast. What's your goal in doing these races? Is it just to finish? Do you have a time goal? Something other than that? Also, what bike are you doing these races on? Mad kudos.

    Cheers


  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by slimphatty View Post
    No clue and you're a ****ing beast. What's your goal in doing these races? Is it just to finish? Do you have a time goal? Something other than that? Also, what bike are you doing these races on? Mad kudos.

    Cheers

    3 things basically. Visit new places, meet new people and have a motivation to stay in shape. My ultimate goal is to do 1 stage race per continent so halfway there

    I ride a Spec Epic one model below the s-works...cheers

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,243
    I'm 99% sure that Sonya Looney did the Brazil Ride, maybe Liz Sampey too (but I think she was in Guatemala/Ecuador?)? Anyhow both are super chill peeps and I'd wager they'd reply if you hit them up on Bookface.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    49
    How about Central America? La Ruta de los Conquistadores in Costa Rica is quite a race. I did it last year and it is quite the adventure. IIRC Gordan Wadsworth (aka Quadsworth on insta) did the Brazil stage race. I'msure that he could tell you about it.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FastDDS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    63
    Let us readers know what South America stage race you end up doing. I wish there was a dedicated MTBR sub forum for stage racing. I have done Breck, Moab Rx, BCBR and have been eyeing the race in Chile as well.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    6,689
    I've got a young friend who did Trans Andes two years ago. He liked it, but didn't quite love it. IIRC, some super steep and rough gravel/rock roads and at least a few days of Big Time Heat. He called it "brain melting". But nobody can predict this winter's weather. I'll ping him on a few more details.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by Bordeauxman View Post
    How about Central America? La Ruta de los Conquistadores in Costa Rica is quite a race. I did it last year and it is quite the adventure. IIRC Gordan Wadsworth (aka Quadsworth on insta) did the Brazil stage race. I'msure that he could tell you about it.
    Thanks. La Ruta is also a good option in SA and it is 3 tough days but in my case if I am going to travel with my bike and visit a new place I rather do something a bit longer. 6-7 days.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    I've got a young friend who did Trans Andes two years ago. He liked it, but didn't quite love it. IIRC, some super steep and rough gravel/rock roads and at least a few days of Big Time Heat. He called it "brain melting". But nobody can predict this winter's weather. I'll ping him on a few more details.
    Thanks. Curious to know what he liked and didn't liked about Trans Andes. Cheers

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by FastDDS View Post
    Let us readers know what South America stage race you end up doing. I wish there was a dedicated MTBR sub forum for stage racing. I have done Breck, Moab Rx, BCBR and have been eyeing the race in Chile as well.
    Those are nice rides you've done. I will come back and post what I find out. As an engineer, I'm sure I'll end up doing some sort of decision analysis matrix with a bunch of variables .

    A sub forum for stage racing would be nice. I think there is enough people out there. That market is growing.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    558
    Quote Originally Posted by shakatak View Post
    Thanks. Curious to know what he liked and didn't liked about Trans Andes. Cheers
    I also have an acquaintance who did Trans Andes a couple years ago and didn't love it. He said the views were amazing and it was a cool experience, but it was more gravel roads than cool single track.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    6,689
    So, at the risk of wildly over-responding, here is what my friend has to say about the Trans-Andes, the good and the bad. Keep in mind that this guy wins 100 mile mtb races like the Butte 100, so "hard" means, well hard:

    Overall, Trans Andes was awesome. It's in a beautiful place, was generally well run and offered really hard, tough racing from around the world. In terms of timeliness and smoothness of operation, it was still distinctly south american - meaning a little looser than USA or German participants might want, but if you want a squeaky clean experience, try Leadville or Cape Epic.

    When I signed up, it was billed as a point to point race, which it had been in the past. Between then and actually race day, they changed to a single location format where every day ran out of base camp. That eliminated some travel/camp set up stress etc. but also meant there was some repetition. We did one race start three times out of five days. And that race start sucked - 500 riders straight into a rutted, gnarly climb. As a whole I would say the change in format was ok for racers, but would have been a real downgrade for "completers."

    That being said, I understand that they changed to a hybrid model for last year - three days in one spot, one relocation and then two more there. I think that'd be a happy medium that would allow for a seeing more different stuff, but without the stress of packing your tent each day.

    Courses were hard. Sometimes hard for the sake of being hard. The profiles were insanely steep and some of the "road climbs" were so rocky and gnarly pedaling up them harder than most single track climbs I'm used to. Even the fastest pros barely crack 10 mph for the day. Most days were between 3 and 4 hours for us, with some folks out there a long time. Some of the trail descents were so damn steep (IMBA would NOT approve) that you kinda climbed all day, then descended very briefly. Everything was rougher and less defined than in the US, but there were sections of really good, badass modern single track descending. The last day was shorter. Nothing like doing an xc race after 4 days of marathon mtb.

    Anyone going to race should be ready to go all out from the gun every day and work really hard at recovering between things. It is not well suited for tourists or people using it as a "ride vacation" the way BC Bike Race or Trans Alps seem to be.

    The food was fine, but not exceptional, which is fine with me. Some of the Australians that had done the Cape Epic were not pleased with the regular meal times rather than endless buffet and lack of free booze. Again, this is a race, not a vacation. It's a bit rough around the edges.

    I loved staying in camp to meet all the other racers from around the world, but it had draw backs. I think they charged too much for that pleasure and it was hard to get cooled down and comfortable after racing hard. I'm sure we would have recovered better if we had rented a house, but would then have had to make our own food and such. I met people that did that option and felt it was cheaper and easier - but I really didn't see them outside of race days.

    Lastly, I have to mention that the damn thing takes place in January and I live in Montana. I worked hard to show up in "bike shape" and spent an absurd time working my ass off on a trainer, which thankfully I dislike less than other people. But I learned the hard way that this did not prep me for heat stress, or technical descending. I felt really awkward on my bike for at least the first three days. If I did it again I would sacrifice some bike specific training for full body strength and being mentally prepared for high speeds by nordic skiing, downhill skiing and skinning up the hill. I think in the end I'd be better prepped, even if the power meter read slightly lower.

    Some people road hardtails. That must have sucked. A lot.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    So, at the risk of wildly over-responding, here is what my friend has to say about the Trans-Andes, the good and the bad. Keep in mind that this guy wins 100 mile mtb races like the Butte 100, so "hard" means, well hard:

    Overall, Trans Andes was awesome. It's in a beautiful place, was generally well run and offered really hard, tough racing from around the world. In terms of timeliness and smoothness of operation, it was still distinctly south american - meaning a little looser than USA or German participants might want, but if you want a squeaky clean experience, try Leadville or Cape Epic.

    When I signed up, it was billed as a point to point race, which it had been in the past. Between then and actually race day, they changed to a single location format where every day ran out of base camp. That eliminated some travel/camp set up stress etc. but also meant there was some repetition. We did one race start three times out of five days. And that race start sucked - 500 riders straight into a rutted, gnarly climb. As a whole I would say the change in format was ok for racers, but would have been a real downgrade for "completers."

    That being said, I understand that they changed to a hybrid model for last year - three days in one spot, one relocation and then two more there. I think that'd be a happy medium that would allow for a seeing more different stuff, but without the stress of packing your tent each day.

    Courses were hard. Sometimes hard for the sake of being hard. The profiles were insanely steep and some of the "road climbs" were so rocky and gnarly pedaling up them harder than most single track climbs I'm used to. Even the fastest pros barely crack 10 mph for the day. Most days were between 3 and 4 hours for us, with some folks out there a long time. Some of the trail descents were so damn steep (IMBA would NOT approve) that you kinda climbed all day, then descended very briefly. Everything was rougher and less defined than in the US, but there were sections of really good, badass modern single track descending. The last day was shorter. Nothing like doing an xc race after 4 days of marathon mtb.

    Anyone going to race should be ready to go all out from the gun every day and work really hard at recovering between things. It is not well suited for tourists or people using it as a "ride vacation" the way BC Bike Race or Trans Alps seem to be.

    The food was fine, but not exceptional, which is fine with me. Some of the Australians that had done the Cape Epic were not pleased with the regular meal times rather than endless buffet and lack of free booze. Again, this is a race, not a vacation. It's a bit rough around the edges.

    I loved staying in camp to meet all the other racers from around the world, but it had draw backs. I think they charged too much for that pleasure and it was hard to get cooled down and comfortable after racing hard. I'm sure we would have recovered better if we had rented a house, but would then have had to make our own food and such. I met people that did that option and felt it was cheaper and easier - but I really didn't see them outside of race days.

    Lastly, I have to mention that the damn thing takes place in January and I live in Montana. I worked hard to show up in "bike shape" and spent an absurd time working my ass off on a trainer, which thankfully I dislike less than other people. But I learned the hard way that this did not prep me for heat stress, or technical descending. I felt really awkward on my bike for at least the first three days. If I did it again I would sacrifice some bike specific training for full body strength and being mentally prepared for high speeds by nordic skiing, downhill skiing and skinning up the hill. I think in the end I'd be better prepped, even if the power meter read slightly lower.

    Some people road hardtails. That must have sucked. A lot.
    Thanks Kosmo!!!....that helps. It sounds a bit more technical that what I've heard from other people. How would it compare in that regard to Breck Epic for example?

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    77
    So it will Brasil Ride. Based on feedback I've seen it seems like the most "complete" stage race in South America. Marathon Stages, Cross Country Stage, Time Trial Stage. Registration complete.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    701
    Quote Originally Posted by shakatak View Post
    Thanks. La Ruta is also a good option in SA and it is 3 tough days but in my case if I am going to travel with my bike and visit a new place I rather do something a bit longer. 6-7 days.
    Lance A is doing La Ruta this week...just say'n
    MyRides - Santa Cruz Tallboy CC, Van Dessel Ramble tamble SS, Look 986 1x10,

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by Walt Disney's Frozen Head View Post
    I'm 99% sure that Sonya Looney did the Brazil Ride, maybe Liz Sampey too (but I think she was in Guatemala/Ecuador?)? Anyhow both are super chill peeps and I'd wager they'd reply if you hit them up on Bookface.
    Sonya Looney has a podcast all about it, defininetly give it a listen if you are thinking about giving it a go...

Similar Threads

  1. Stage race partner wanted. The legend of el dorado " stage race
    By luisfrailef in forum Endurance XC Racing
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-28-2017, 10:55 AM
  2. Tour De France: Stage by Stage overview
    By squashyo in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-08-2014, 02:03 PM
  3. Replies: 22
    Last Post: 08-18-2013, 07:16 AM
  4. Stage Race this weekend in south central PA! Check it out!
    By jbb223 in forum Virginia, WV, Maryland, DC, Delaware
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-25-2011, 08:02 AM
  5. Pisgah Stage Race - Stage 5 - whole lotta Nuts
    By brado1 in forum North & South Carolina
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-02-2011, 06:16 PM

Members who have read this thread: 27

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.