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  1. #1
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    24 solo pacing in 90 degree plus heat?

    Anyone have expierence with 24 hour pacing on hot days. I use a HRM to track effort and keep my HR under 150 bpm other than climbs which I try to limit my bpm spike as much as possible.

    I wondering if any effort above moderate to hard in the heat will effect recovery efforts on later laps. Race temps are expected to be in the low 90's and drop into the upper 60's at night.

  2. #2
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    Have you ever ridden hard in those temps? If you have not trained in the heat drink A LOT, stay current on your electrolytes and pray for the dark.

    The less you can push in heat the better off you will be, I know that can reduce the length of time that I can push hard by as much as 30%.

    All 24hr races are won at night anyway so you may be ok.

  3. #3
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    ^^That's absolutely right. At a recent 50-miler the temp was 107, over half the field DNF'd due to the heat; those that hydrated properly were fine. Knowing it was going to be a hot race, my strategy was to drink a gallon of sports drink the day previous, 40oz before the race and 200oz total in the four-and-change hours of the race itself. Sure, you'll pee like a racehorse but it's better than the alternative. I wore a camelbak, which I rarely do but don't regret at all because it's just so much easier to access than a bottle, particularly if the course has extended technical sections. I took a total of 10 E-tabs too.
    Good luck!

  4. #4
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    Where I live, we have just finished our hottest summer in recorded history of almost 90 days over 100 degrees with several around 110. My riding this summer suffered due to the heat. After about 3 hours, my body didn't respond very well due to the heat. So I did more interval training rather than long sustained rides. So 90's feels cool to me now.

    I'm going to be wearing a camelbak racebak that fits in a undershirt under my race jersey. It holds 70oz and in my recent training for this race, I'm drinking almost 35-40 oz per hour to stay hydrated during the heat of th day which is about 2PM-7PM. I've heard pro racers talk about not going into the red in our area due to the heat because you can't recover fast enough.

    Eventhough I consider myself aclimated to the heat, the thermometer says its hot. I was just courious if anyone had some experience in a long race like this in the heat. My goal is a top five finish and I'm concerned about getting a lap or more down by dark if I take it too easy. (Estimated solo lap times to be an hour to around 1:20) However, I'm figuring if I take it too easy during the heat, I still have roughly 16 hours to make it up.

  5. #5
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    Rocky Hill was hot and humid last year. Start slow and stay slow during the day. Don't get tricked into starting out too fast in the excitement. Take it really easy on the opening climbs until you reach Karaway. Let everyone pass you. You'll catch them at night and the next day. While they're cramping and napping, you'll have enough gas in the tank to power through.

    Not sure how the under-the-shirt camelbak thing will work. I alternated between 2 standard packs during the race. My pit crew prepared one pack while I was riding and I just dropped a pack when I rode into the pit and threw on the other pack and rode out. Stop times were minimal. Not sure how easy it will be to refill a camelbak that's under a shirt, though. I'm sure you've figured all that out though.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gearjunkie88 View Post
    Rocky Hill was hot and humid last year. Start slow and stay slow during the day. Don't get tricked into starting out too fast in the excitement. Take it really easy on the opening climbs until you reach Karaway. Let everyone pass you. You'll catch them at night and the next day. While they're cramping and napping, you'll have enough gas in the tank to power through.

    Not sure how the under-the-shirt camelbak thing will work. I alternated between 2 standard packs during the race. My pit crew prepared one pack while I was riding and I just dropped a pack when I rode into the pit and threw on the other pack and rode out. Stop times were minimal. Not sure how easy it will be to refill a camelbak that's under a shirt, though. I'm sure you've figured all that out though.
    Are you racing this year? Looks like there are some fast guys racing this time .
    Guess that'll be my plan...let them go and trust I can make it up later in the night. I'm hoping to ride straight through till I can't go anymore or race is over. Cool front just blew in and looks like race time will be in mid 80's now.

  7. #7
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    Sadly, not doing the race this year. :-(

  8. #8
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    Use your available data with caution in extreme heat (heart rate, power, cadence). In my experience, it is essential to ignore the early race excitement -- as noted above -- and carefully and honestly listen to what your inner self (gag!) is telling you about your pace.

    Wear as little clothing as possible. EVERY bare surface on your body is a heat radiator. I can even tell the difference between no glasses and large-sized glasses regular sox and anklets when it starts getting really hot.

    High temp endurance racing has an even bigger mental component than usual. You almost have to take strength from seeing others retire from the heat and just say to yourself "Huh, doesn't seem THAT bad. Time to carry on."
    Whining is not a strategy.

  9. #9
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    I rode the 24 Hours in the Canyon last year when bike computers were reading 130+, one of the hanging thermometers that pepper Palo Duro Canyon read 140. Officially I think it was 112 in the canyon. Needless to say there was some resting in the shade going on. I had an early mechanical and a few laps in I decided to double up 2 laps and found my heartrate pegged but my speed and effort low = time to get off the bike. I rode Guts-N-Glory and it was hot but I just did the steady pace riding and suffered badly but never blew up. I generally run bottles in the day to keep heat off my back. I'll run a pack at night because temps are cooler and I like my batteries in a pack not a jersey pocket. The brutual hot stories are for not because temps are looking pretty good... for us locals anyway.

    I think the early pacing has been mentioned multiple times. As you get farther into the race unless you know exactly who you are racing I suggest you let riders that pass go. Sometimes I'll pace on them just to make sure I'm not slacking. If you're riding solo you might be chasing team riders... pretty much don't chase anything. I don't have a hard time letting riders go because I'm usually just riding my ride/race. What I really have to hold back on is when I'm catching. It is real hard (especially if you've done any XC or road racing) not to want to chase hard ease up to drop a few bpm and then blow by racers to gap them. Try real hard not to dog the rabbits. They're coming to you and they'll keep coming to you then they'll drop behind. If they decide to fight it just let them burn a match then reel them back in later.

    I haven't ridden Rocky Hill much but I can tell you as a general rule don't hurt yourself lap after lap on a shortish segment that you can clean with serious effort instead walk. I suggest you go ahead and take the time penalty and the blow to the "never walk what you can ride ego" and save the legs.

    Usually there are a couple of big boys going strong forever. If you are one of those guys hang with them. If not you'll likely sort yourself into a cohort that is with in a lap or two and the separation will come overnight (or not). Hopefully with your support team you'll be able to figure out how get the finish you want and are capable of.

    Basically diesel the the race don't F1 it.

  10. #10
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    Rovertd...yours are words of wisdom for any hot 24 solo. Ride conservatively in the heat then "own the night" and pass all those riders who shelled themselves in the heat of the day...


    Rovertd Quote: I think the early pacing has been mentioned multiple times. As you get farther into the race unless you know exactly who you are racing I suggest you let riders that pass go. Sometimes I'll pace on them just to make sure I'm not slacking. If you're riding solo you might be chasing team riders... pretty much don't chase anything. I don't have a hard time letting riders go because I'm usually just riding my ride/race. What I really have to hold back on is when I'm catching. It is real hard (especially if you've done any XC or road racing) not to want to chase hard ease up to drop a few bpm and then blow by racers to gap them. Try real hard not to dog the rabbits. They're coming to you and they'll keep coming to you then they'll drop behind. If they decide to fight it just let them burn a match then reel them back in later.

  11. #11
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    I've heard back from my guys, sounds like it was a good event again. With the race done, let us know how your first one went Crimecrusher.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by staylor View Post
    I've heard back from my guys, sounds like it was a good event again. With the race done, let us know how your first one went Crimecrusher.
    Staylor, your guy did great. My wife won the female solo open so I can't be more proud of her.

    My race was going good till my nutrition got messed up. Looks like I had too much protien in my infinit mix and started to bloat around hour 3-4. Was riding good and made it into 4th when I got a bad case of GI and started throwing up. Had to take 3 hours off and started to ride again and after two more laps I started throwing up again.

    I had one bad lap when I ripped a sidewal on my back up bike, after putting a tube in I didn't have anymore rear brakes which caused a crash and made me slow down a lot. My primary light went out leaving only my back up on the bar and I flatted again a mile out of the TA so I just rode in on the rim figuring it was faster than walking. Lost 30 min on that lap.

    The hard part to deal with was I felt good and was riding good and believe I could have done very well if I hadn't gotten sick. I rode every climb and felt like I could start pushing when ever I was ready. My plan was to push the laps after midnight but I got sick at 11PM. and I tried to get back in and after two more laps had to stop after EMS visited me. I couldn't even hold down water. It felt like my insides were exploding and don't think I've ever been that sick in my life. ...Next year.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by crimecrusher View Post
    Staylor, your guy did great. My wife won the female solo open so I can't be more proud of her.

    My race was going good till my nutrition got messed up. Looks like I had too much protien in my infinit mix and started to bloat around hour 3-4. Was riding good and made it into 4th when I got a bad case of GI and started throwing up. Had to take 3 hours off and started to ride again and after two more laps I started throwing up again.

    I had one bad lap when I ripped a sidewal on my back up bike, after putting a tube in I didn't have anymore rear brakes which caused a crash and made me slow down a lot. My primary light went out leaving only my back up on the bar and I flatted again a mile out of the TA so I just rode in on the rim figuring it was faster than walking. Lost 30 min on that lap.

    The hard part to deal with was I felt good and was riding good and believe I could have done very well if I hadn't gotten sick. I rode every climb and felt like I could start pushing when ever I was ready. My plan was to push the laps after midnight but I got sick at 11PM. and I tried to get back in and after two more laps had to stop after EMS visited me. I couldn't even hold down water. It felt like my insides were exploding and don't think I've ever been that sick in my life. ...Next year.
    Sorry to hear about the Infinit issue, I've never had that problem racing on Infinit and none of my athletes have seen anything like that (they use my race formulas). I suspect by now you've contacted Infinit to dial things in a bit more.

    Two of my guys placed well at the race, securing 1st and 2nd in the Open category. The third athlete who was in the mix (who could have made it onto the podium) ran into a bit of problems with an injury... a bit sad about that but that's racing.

    Congratulations to your wife on the podium, that's a great accomplishment. Next year it's your turn!

  14. #14
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    Wow, you had bad case of GI, threw up and still felt good to race? I wish I could feel better when I get sick. Props to your wife!

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