2006 KTR Results- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    2006 KTR Results

    There were 56 starters (including 5 women) and 24 finishers (including 4 women).

    Overall results:
    1) Jon Brown 13:26 (overall course record, single speed course record)
    2) Dave Harris 13:55
    3) Jason Stubbe 14:11
    4) Jay Petervary 14:41
    5) Fred Wilkinson 14:48
    6) Ethan Passant 14:53
    7) Lynda Wallenfels 15:03 (female course record)
    8) Jari Kirkland 16:28
    9) Fred Marmsater 16:29
    10) Adam Lisonbee 17:25
    11) Marko Ross-Bryant 17:31
    12) Rob Writz 17:37
    13) Ed Ellinger 17:42
    14) Stefan Griebel 18:40
    15) Jenna Woodbury 18:59
    16) Keith Richards-Dinger 19:11
    17) Andrew Mesesan 19:12
    18) Greg Bachman 19:29
    19) Cat Morrison 20:25
    20) Brad Kee 20:35
    21) Bill Shand 22:11
    22) Pierre Ostor 23:57
    23) Essam Welch 24:30
    24) Erika Van Meter 26:30

    The high point (for me) of this year's race was sitting at the finish and listening to all of the stories. Not having raced, listening helped to ease the sting of being 'on the outside'. I hope that many/most/all of those involved can find the time to chime in here with a few thoughts or an anecdote from their day. Some of my favorites:
    * Andrew Mesesan starting the race with a cracked frame.
    * Jon Brown laying waste to the course record on a single speed bike, then downplaying the effort with an "Aww shucks, 'tweren't nuthin'" attitude as he soaked up the shade and the beer.
    * Lynda Wallenfels scorching the course and placing 7th overall. She was the only one still bubbling and light on her feet afterwards.
    * Dave Harris jumping into Salt Creek to cool off ~15 miles before the finish. Too bad he was too cooked to remember the Ipod and digi cam inside his jersey...
    * Bill, Pierre, and Erika soldiering on to finish in the wee hours. I think these three believe that the other 20 got shorted because they didn't get as much saddle time...
    * Countless stories of climbing into the La Sals under the light of a full moon that was bright enough to sew by.

    Hope to hear some more.

    DNF's:
    Dean Cahow
    Adam Bartlett
    Marshall Bird
    Joe Hardin
    Dave Allen
    Josh Squires
    Gary Dye
    Kevin Gillest
    Josh Darnell
    Lee Blackwell
    Sargent McDonald
    Alan Doak
    Tom Stack
    Bob Dawson
    Brian Hannon
    Jennifer Kwasnewski
    Jesper Kristensen
    Jim Ishman
    Danny Armstrong
    Kenny Jones
    Jake Anderson
    Travis Macy
    Jon Bailey
    Steve "Dr. Doom" Fassbinder
    Rick Hudak
    Scott Morris
    Alex Dolpp
    Jim Leikert
    Nye Brennan
    Dejay Birtch
    Jake Kirkpatrick
    Tom Warr

    Most of the DNF's were dehydration/depletion related. While the high temp was only 85 degrees, the aridity of the region combined with the 4500' to 9000' elevations sucked the moisture out of the racers faster than they could put it back in. Nausea (due to dehydration) and sun/heatstroke were commonly reported among finishers and DNF's alike.

    There were two injuries (Travis Macy broke his collarbone and Nye Brennan seperated his shoulder) but both riders were able to make it safely off course due to the kindness/sacrifices of others. To Steve Fassbinder and Rick Hudak, both of whom ended their races to assist these guys off the course: I wish the world had more people like you. Thanks.

    The low point (for me) of this year's race was the widespread cheating. With the largest KTR field ever came the largest number of rules infractions ever. I witnessed many racers accepting assistance, drafting, and cutting the course, not to mention the reports/complaints I fielded from other racers of similar instances. When confronted with their infractions, these racers either denied them or tried to rationalize them. I thought long and hard about DQ'ing some of the cheaters, but decided against it. Rather than incur their misplaced wrath and create enemies and bad feelings, I simply listed the time that they crossed the line and I hope that karma sorts them out.

    At this point it is extremely unlikely that I will organize this race in the future. The number of people that are interested in playing by the rules seems largely dwarfed by those who want to cheat. Why someone would feel the need to cheat at a race that offers no media attention or prize money is simply beyond my comprehension. Why these people don't simply ride the route with a sag wagon on any other day of the year is also beyond me. At any rate, I think the race has run it's course.

    To all of those that played by the rules: Sorry about the harsh tone of this report. If I were able to convey my complete disappointment in the integrity of those who cheated, this would be a much darker, angrier note. Considering the time, money, effort, and heart that I've invested into this event over the past 6 years, I feel little more than hollow right now.

    I can't begin to express my gratitude to all of those who've come and raced and played by the rules over the years. There were many of you in the '06 KTR, and I wish there were many more. May we meet again.

    Happy trails,

    Mike Curiak
    KTR director
    Last edited by mikesee; 06-05-2006 at 02:18 PM.

  2. #2
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    I for one am happy to have you doing this sort of stuff. While I don't have any intentions of racing the koko or gdr or whatever, I love reading about it and hearing about it.

    I'd like to see the future of our sport move more towards long days - and you're a driving force, thank you!
    Take the long cut, we'll get there eventually.

  3. #3
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    What a great time

    Mike and to all the racers great job. I have no doubts that I would have finished. However due to breaking one crank arm off and severally cracking the other I could not continue past the Dewy Bridge. However I had the water and the endurance to finish. I was very dissipointed that I could not go on. But thats the way things go. It was one of the greatest races I have ever been to. I loved the whole thing. I hope to see it carry. Even though the cheating really sucks. But we all now that cheaters never win. It was I feel still a great event. I hope that many others write in and express their thanks to Mike for making this thing happen. I hope to see it go on as well. I would love another crack at this thing. I feel very confident that I would have finished had it not been for the broken cranks. But I would like to extend a huge thanks to Mike C. for all he did.

    Keep it real guys.

    Thanks

  4. #4
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    Thanks Mike!

    Mike - thanks for all the time and effort you've donated for all of us. Hopefully in time the sour taste will be replaced by something better...and we'll get to hit some trail together!

    My blog report is here.
    Dave

    Anything is possible. The impossible just takes longer.

    2 Epic

  5. #5
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    Mike,

    Thanks for your efforts. This was without a doubt the best day I have had on a bike. From the euphoric climbs under the moonlight, to the wilting heat in Rabbit Valley, it all added up to an enormous day, one that I will not soon forget.

    For what it is worth, I'd hate to see the race go away, but I understand where you are coming from.

    -Adam
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  6. #6

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    I have to ask.

    What kind of dipsh*t cheats in a race that the main prize is personal gratification?

  7. #7

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    KTR, what a ride!

    Mike, sorry I haven't been able to get to a computer to contact you but I must be counted among the DNF's. I made it to the Dewey bridge in a little over 10 hours feeling okay. The next 10 miles sucked out all my energy and I made a decsion to play it on the safe side and not risk any more heat exhaustion than I had already endured and rode hwy 128 back to the dewey bridge and caught a ride (and a cold PBR) back to moab. I believe that the hardest part of the course was behind me and would have loved to push on but felt it would have been irresponsible with so many unknowns. All in all it was a great day for me and a ride that I'll never forget and that's what it's all about right. As far as the cheating you speak of I didn't see any ... but I was in the back the whole time! Remember, it's about the journey, not the destination.

    Joe Hardin

  8. #8
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    Pardon my ignorance, since I'm not quite savvy to this race, but how does one cheat in a race such as this?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpinWheelz
    Pardon my ignorance, since I'm not quite savvy to this race, but how does one cheat in a race such as this?
    The rules are very simple, very basic. No outside support whatsoever. Bring what you need, nothing more.

    What's cheating?

    Drafting. Water/supply caches. Accepting aid from anyone on the course.
    Dave

    Anything is possible. The impossible just takes longer.

    2 Epic

  10. #10
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    Sounds like a great time, bummer about the cheats.

    There's always a few boneheads that just don't get it.
    Some times do look just too close to be coincidence after riding for such a long time.
    I was really looking forward to doing the KTR next year.

  11. #11
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    Only read this post if you cheated!

    Are you proud that your time is listed next to others who played by the rules? How do you feel now about finishing but not really finishing? Maybe now you're wondering if you really could've done it without cheating. Well, you don't deserve a second chance, and now it looks like you won't get one next year anyway.

    The rules are so simple! Actually, there is only one rule: Solo, unsupported time-trial of the Kokopelli Trail. Many needed clarification of what “solo, unsupported” meant, and Mike happily spelled it out in no uncertain terms. No outside support. No stashing anything. No shortcutting. Pack it in, pack it out. No drafting.

    I just can't get my mind around why you would even choose to join this event with the intent of cheating! The race is free, there is no registration, and there are no prizes. It is uniquely an individual test to see what you are capable of, with some competition thrown in for added motivation. In short, this race is one man's labor of love, and cheating is like stabbing Mike Curiak in the back. And then to be caught doing it and attempt to deny or rationalize your actions? WTF? I mean, seriously, WTF!?!

    I hiked up Rose Garden hill at daybreak with two other racers, and then I didn't see another racer until Rabbit Valley road. There was a wonderful headwind that I battled on my own for 15 miles from Cisco landing to the Westwater Road. Feel better about drafting now?

    I left the Fisher Creek ditch with 300oz of water, mostly on my back. It took me 15-20 minutes to filter this amount. Feel better about stashing or accepting water now?

    Six miles from the finish, I was so toast that I had to lay down beside the trail for over an hour, drinking all the electrolytes I had just to recover enough to get to the finish line. That six miles might as well have been sixty before I spent an hour on my back recovering. Feel better about cutting the course now?

    Mike was magnanimous in not calling out your names and DQ'ing you. Even though I don't feel you deserve a second chance, he has essentially given you one! Do the honorable thing - stand up, fess up, and DQ yourself. Maybe Mike and the rest of the community will accept your apology. Otherwise, you will have ruined this race for everyone.

    Stefan Griebel
    Last edited by Stefan_G; 05-15-2006 at 09:54 AM.

  12. #12

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    Ktr

    Just talked to Josh Squires and Dave Allen. They are out and on their way back to MN.

  13. #13
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    Good Job to all the Clean Competitors!

    I called it a day at Cisco after sucking down 70 oz. of water in 1.5 hours and still having 20 miles to go to Westwater. Just a few miles earlier, I was feeling so good...but that went downhill fast, so I cut my losses. Kudos to all those who pushed through the pain and found it in them to finish.

    I was riding up to the highway, and Patti ? gave me a ride to the Westwater exit where I took a nap under the overpass. I called my wife on the cell phone and had her drive from our hotel in Fruita to come pick me up.

    It's saddening to hear about a few that bent the rules to get an edge. I feel like this year I got a feel for the trail and the scale and seriousness of the KTR. As soon as I got back to the hotel, I starting thinking: "Next year, I'll do this and that differently..."

    Did anyone get chased by the dogs near the sheepherder's trailer? A white dog ran after me for a while, but then gave up in the heat.

    Anyhow, here's a few photos...

    1) Nice guy from Michigan at the top of Rose Garden Hill
    2) Dewey Bridge, a wonderful site
    3) Bob and Tim? before Cisco
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by tomdog; 05-15-2006 at 10:09 AM.

  14. #14
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    Everyone!!

    Thanks so much for the opportunity to compete with you. I am in absolute awe at the strength and ability all of you exhibited, finishers and non-finishers alike. Just incredible.

    The only bummer for me was not meeting more of you at the finish.

    MC, thanks for sharing the pioneering inspiration, vision and philosophy. This truly is the kind of epic race I enjoy. Oh, and thanks for those slices of pizza at the end. I honestly didn't think I could eat anything but I wolfed those down and felt way better.

    I posted my novel here w/ a few pics (subject to further editing )

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=140861&page=7

    Until we see each other again -

    Ed E
    Last edited by edemtbs; 05-15-2006 at 10:52 AM.

  15. #15
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    If you have collaborative eyewitnesses or other signigicant evidence, what about reporting suspected cheaters to other large promoters in private e-mails? Then those promoters could choose to not allow the individuals to enter their events.
    A minor consequence, but a consequence nevertheless.
    I hope you have this event next year- I already have it in mind.
    Mike

  16. #16
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    FWIW I saw a real clean race full of savvy and honest competitors relishing the challenge set out. I saw some drafting in the first few minutes near the start up Sand Flats road when it was crowded but that was somewhat unavoidable for about 20 minutes until it thinned out.

    My report of my wee slice of the race is here

  17. #17
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    I didn't see any funny business going on either. That's not to say it didn't happen...just not in my range of view. I crashed going down North Beaver Mesa...went headfirst into the sand. It probably looked a lot worse than it was. A rider stopped to ask if I was OK, but offered me no further assistance.

    I saw people waiting to watch the riders go by at certain points on the course...but as far as I could tell, no support was offered.

    I am still in awe at the power and endurance of most of the riders who were in this event.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by edemtbs
    Thanks so much for the opportunity to compete with you. I am in absolute awe at the strength and ability all of you exhibited, finishers and non-finishers alike. Just incredible.

    MC, thanks for sharing the pioneering inspiration, vision and philosophy. This truly is the kind of epic race I enjoy.

    The only bummer for me was not meeting more of you at the finish.

    I posted my novel here w/ a few pics (subject to further editing )

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=140861&page=7

    Until we see each other again -

    Ed E
    Nice write up Ed. Congrats on a good finish. Your experience on Salt Creek really mirrored mine. That hike-a-bike stuff just kicked me in the gut over and over. Eventually I had to stop and soak my head with the last bit of water I had. When I finally hit Mary's, I was blessing and cursing her all at once. FYI, the third pic in your write up is me. If I remember right, that is on Mary's.
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  19. #19
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    [QUOTE=mikesee] The low point (for me) of this year's race was the widespread cheating. [/QUOTE]

    Mike, first let me say thanks again for the KTR experience! Even though I did not finish (dropped out at Cisco Landing) I enjoyed this event more than any other in 20 yrs of mountain biking!! From a purely selfish point of view I hope you DO IT AGAIN NEXT YEAR. I even started re-tuning my strategy for 07 while sitting/waiting at Cisco Landing (thanks to Debby (?) from Steamboat for calling my wife to come get me). I am now totally bummed to read you may not do it next yr. For whatever it is worth I would like to relate three personal experiences on cheating.

    First, because I had the chance to pre ride the course I was aware of the sharp left turn off of Sand Flats road, I knew it would be easy to miss at night as you are going down hill and you could fly right by. When I saw the turn approaching I realized the rider 10 yards in front of me was missing the turn so without thinking I instinctively yelled to him. Who knows how far he would of gone if I had not yelled, maybe 20 yrs, maybe a mile. Opps I just out of the blue gave a little outside support.

    Second, I did see two riders who apparently were taking some type of support from a pickup truck at the top second climb, right where the pavement ends. Time was about 4:10am so why would anyone feel the need to cheat this far back???. I was riding up without lights and could not see exactly what they were doing but as soon as they saw the lighted rider coming up behind me the truck pulled away and the two riders walked away from their bikes as if trying to hide? I had some mixed feelings right then but decided not to waste any energy or emotion on cheaters, didn’t say a word and instead took in the awesome night view and focused on the fact that I had topped out the climb ahead of my personal turtle schedule and could look forward to some downhill time. The whole thing was soon out of my mind and I was back in focus on MY ride.

    Third experience happened at Cisco Landing waiting for my wife to come pick me up. I had dropped out with mild heat exhaustion a few hours earlier and was sitting in the shade by the river when two SS riders came in (Husband & Wife) and filled there water bottles. We chatted for a few minutes as they debated pushing on or dropping out. It was quite late in the day but after a little discussion they decided to keep going, at least to Westwater, when they rode off I noticed they went the wrong way, they tried to follow the river instead of going back up to road where the KT turned off.. About 5 or 10 min later the Husband reappeared by himself, I asked what happened and he said they went the wrong way and that his wife had a flat and could not get her pump to work and of course he could not let her use his pump. So he had come back to maybe scrounge some ice water from some rafters to take back to his wife as they would now have to quit or cheat by using his pump. The rafters had left so there was no ice to be had (so no support here) and he started back up the false trail to collect the wife. About two min later they both rode back with big smiles; she had got the pump to work while he was gone, fixed her own tire and with a big smile and wave they off and going again. I felt more than a little skeptical about them finishing the entire course but they clearly had the right spirit about not taking outside support.

    I realize for the riders at the top end of the pyramid it must really rub the wrong way that someone cheated to place higher on the finish time sheet. But Mike my 2 cents is that if other than for the cheaters (who just don’t get it) you would do your KTR again next yr you should do so. Just don’t let anyone who is missing the whole point of an epic unsupported race/ride spoil it for you. If on the other hand after 6 yrs of doing this you are ready to turn a page in life so be it.

    Thanks Again
    M Bird

  20. #20
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    To all those who finished, a huge congrats! I'm having a wonderful time reading each and every story.

    To all those who cheated, I don't know what to say. I've been looking forward to KTR 2007 since I found out I couldn't race this year and if it doesn't happen I suppose I'll just line up on my own and go it solo anyway.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomdog
    Did anyone get chased by the dogs near the sheepherder's trailer? A white dog ran after me for a while, but then gave up in the heat.
    Dogs!! You encountered those sheep dogs! I went through a herd of sheep (naked little buggers looked like they had been recently sheared) but luckily there were no dogs when I went by them. As I approached the sheep I totally got worried about the dogs.

    Thank goodness they did not "hound" you any worse than a short chase. I had to wait for 20-30 mins. this spring when three of them surrounded me and wouldn't let me move. They were quite nasty.

    Ed E

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pivvay
    if it doesn't happen I suppose I'll just line up on my own and go it solo anyway.
    Good point. I mean no disrespect to MC when I say that as an individual TT, it can be done anytime, so even if it wasn't "organized", one could still go for the challenge, the experience.

    There simply would not be the same aura without MC as the organizing catalyst, though. He brought 56 enduro nutz together at midnight under a full moon from far and wide, 56 folks that under ordinary circumstances don't get the opportunity to meet and ride together.

    This one's gonna take time. Time to heal, forgive, forget...and confess. Then we'll see what happens in a year. Hope to ride with a bunch of likeminded crackheads in the not too distant future once again...
    Dave

    Anything is possible. The impossible just takes longer.

    2 Epic

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by hairball_dh
    Good point. I mean no disrespect to MC when I say that as an individual TT, it can be done anytime, so even if it wasn't "organized", one could still go for the challenge, the experience.

    There simply would not be the same aura without MC as the organizing catalyst, though. He brought 56 enduro nutz together at midnight under a full moon from far and wide, 56 folks that under ordinary circumstances don't get the opportunity to meet and ride together.

    This one's gonna take time. Time to heal, forgive, forget...and confess. Then we'll see what happens in a year. Hope to ride with a bunch of likeminded crackheads in the not too distant future once again...
    I 100% agree with you. I hope MC runs it again because it would just not be the same solo. I will feel like I missed out if he doesn't. But I understand how much work it is and to do it for free and feel like you are slapped in the face.
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  24. #24
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    Trail717,

    That was me and my boyfriend Jesper, the SS couple, you ran into at Cisco Landing. Thanks for noting how we maintained a strict rule not to cheat, even though Jesper could easilly have fixed my flat for me. We did end up dropping out at Westwater, with mixed feelings even now. However, the race was an amazing experience and I too have been devising my plans to make it to the end next year. I truly hope Mike realizes what fair-minded racers got out of this event and holds it again.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by alizbee
    Nice write up Ed. Congrats on a good finish. Your experience on Salt Creek really mirrored mine. That hike-a-bike stuff just kicked me in the gut over and over. Eventually I had to stop and soak my head with the last bit of water I had. When I finally hit Mary's, I was blessing and cursing her all at once. FYI, the third pic in your write up is me. If I remember right, that is on Mary's.
    Hey Adam -

    I would have introduced myself to you but MC told me how you were feeling so I decided to just go lay on my back on a picnic table before I puked.

    Great job and nice finish. If only I'd been just 18 mins. faster, I could have cracked the top ten like you did!!

    And yes that is Mary's very near the finish, after Horsethief but before Rustlers - that is where my friend was positioned when he took the pic.

    Ed E

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by edemtbs
    Hey Adam -

    I would have introduced myself to you but MC told me how you were feeling so I decided to just go lay on my back on a picnic table before I puked.

    Great job and nice finish. If only I'd been just 18 mins. faster, I could have cracked the top ten like you did!!

    Ed E
    doh!...you should have come over. I looked a lot worse than I felt. It took me about 30 minutes to get my composure back after the race.


    I managed to get a detailed report of my own up. It can be read here
    Last edited by alizbee; 05-15-2006 at 01:35 PM.
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    big big props

    All who attempted this event are amazing . It seemed to be very difficult and the temps weren't doing you any favours.
    I noticed one of my heroes finished (Pierre) and that places him one step higher to guru in my books.
    Mike , I hope that things weren't to disappointing for you this year and you find some satisfaction in helping others find self reliance and strength . Remember you cannot save them all , only the ones who want to be saved.
    I myself find this event very interesting and if other editions happen in the future I might have to learn to be more self reliant . I guess I should start by learning how to ration food and water.
    Dallas " learning the ropes" Sigurdur

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    To all the riders

    I have been reading the comments on here about the race. I believe that it is important that we keep doing this event even if Mike cannot for what ever the reason. I hope that we as a group can keep this going hopefuly with Mike backing it up. I loved this event and the pain felt great. I would like to note that the cheating that everyone has been talking about, I did not see any cheating on the course. I hope we can race in 2007.

  29. #29
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    IttyBittyBetty

    Quote Originally Posted by IttyBittyBetty
    Trail717,

    That was me and my boyfriend Jesper, the SS couple,......
    Sorry if I got you and Jesper married at Cisco Landing. Glad to hear you both made Westwater ok. As you and Jesper rode off I was admiring your 'can do' attitude and feeling bad that I had earlier taken outside support and called in my wife for rescue, I was about ready to go again.

    Unrelated Side Note: I am not sure how hot it really got but my cycle computer thermometer (not very accurate) consistently showed temps in the mid to high 90's at McGraw Bottom around 1:00pm

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    thanks Mike!

    For putting on the show. Congrats to jon and the rest of the crew that burned up the course. It sure scourched my sorry @$$.

    Mike, I hope you slowly change your mind and that we will have more MC-style events to look forward too and plan for.

    Fred M

  31. #31
    Really I am that slow
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    A big round



    Too cool guys and gals... Way to ride it!

    Cheats and the such may your armpits be infested with fleas from a 1000 camels


    Mike way to go for putting this on and putting up with what bugs you. Such a cool event hope to do next year wheather its just me or abunch of other folks out there with me.
    Read my BLOG!

    just a guy who loves bikes and exploring

  32. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by mp3
    There's always a few boneheads that just don't get it.
    Some times do look just too close to be coincidence after riding for such a long time.
    I was really looking forward to doing the KTR next year. :mad
    :

    Some of those close times are coincidence. The Kokopelli is the equalizer, in particular the "oven" hike-a-bikes between Salt Creek and the top of Troy Built. There is a common theme from a group of folks who got caught in a heat index over 90 degrees in that area, and it kinda compressed us together. Like Mike told me after the race (not the exact words): You never know what is going to happen out there.

    As I sat above the first hike after Salt Creek I saw Stefan and DJ? (singlespeeder) arrive at the creek. A few minutes later I passed Adam who was sitting in the only piece of shade for miles soaking his head in an attempt to lower his body temperature. Adam then passed me at the top of Troy Built where I was crashed next to a boulder. I think Lynda's blog and Ed's comments describe that section well.

    This was a great race of personal gratification, here are my high-lites:
    -The full moon... beautiful. It was so bright that I mistook it for someone's light a few times.

    -Riding near Lynda and Jari from the Porcupine Rim turn-off through Dewey Bridge. It was absolutely amazing to be able to watch atheletes of that caliber! At Dewey I stopped to munch on my peanut putter & jelly and they showed me the wheel from there.

    -Digging myself out of the deepest hole I have ever found myself in. I felt pretty good all the way to Salt Creek and then just got slapped in the heat (heat exhaustion/stroke?). It took all my gutz to finish. Thats all I can say about that... It was a very personal experience.

    Thanks everyone for the race! I understand Mike's feelings, and respect his right to do as he chooses. I can only imagine how many similar races such as this will spawn from here? Get together with your friends, set up your own rules, make up your own course, and have fun.

    Rob W.

  33. #33
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    What I want to know is how that water bottle caged worked out for the ex WW owner....

  34. #34
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    Simple Suggestion

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    The low point (for me) of this year's race was the widespread cheating. ........ Rather than incur their misplaced wrath and create enemies and bad feelings, I simply listed the time that they crossed the line and I hope that karma sorts them out.

    At this point it is extremely unlikely that I will organize this race in the future. .

    Happy trails,

    Mike Curiak
    KTR director
    Congrats to all of you who attempted this journey, props to those who completed it, and even more for those who planned it.

    I'm not sure if MC is taking suggestions right now but how about this: Hold future races under two categories - Unsupported and Supported. Post the times for the Unsupported people, and just list Supported as "finishers" if they complete. Unsupported being held under rules, and Supported being caches, drafting, etc. You will automatically parse out a bunch of cheating violations and people can still ride the route with the relative safety of big numbers...while others can show their survival skills in the Unsupported category.

    Its always easier to remove the opportunity for cheating than it is to police violations.

  35. #35
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by sherpaxc
    What I want to know is how that water bottle caged worked out for the ex WW owner....
    That MTBR episode briefly crossed my mind as I rode on Saturday.

    I was lucky and able to carry three bottles on my WW's.

    Ed E

  36. #36
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    Great job to all those that finished within the rules. I hate to see this race go away as I was planned to attend next year.

    To the cheaters....thanks for nothing folks. I cannot begin to comprehend why.

    MC, please reconsider.

    Eddie O

  37. #37
    Just go ride!
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    Stats, highs, lows, and in-betweens.

    First of all, a huge thanks to MC for organizing this race and then going even further by sacrificing his participation in the ride for the sake of "policing" it. Along with many others, I sincerely hope this race will continue in the future as I am already thinking about how I could improve and what I would do differently next year. Congratulations to everyone who even had the guts to start this race!

    Stats from my bike computer:
    • 142.07 miles (Includes 2 wrong/missed turns and backtracks. < 4 miles extra)
    • 14,930 cumulative feet of elevation gain
    • 98F high (bottom of Bitter Creek hill ~2pm?)
    • 43F low (Fisher Creek/Ditch ~3am)
    • 16h15m pedal time (finished in 18h40m), max. speed 41.2mph


    Highs
    • Moonlight, moonlight, beautiful moonlight! No artificial lights needed for the uphills. I love riding by the moonlight, and the temps and atmosphere were absolutely perfect!
    • Banana Cream Ensure. Holy Smokes!!! I'd never had one before, so I only brought 1. Wish I had 6!
    • Learning what it feels like to be efficient! I arrived at Dewey bridge at 7:28am, and left at 7:35am after drinking that awesome Ensure, removing my jacket and legwarmers, relubing my chain and my a$$, slathering on sunscreen, switching to dark sunglasses and trading windstopper gloves for biking gloves. Only 7 minutes! Probably slow by some people's standards, but I'm used to spending 30 minutes for something like that.
    • Staying efficient! I rode from Dewey to Rabbit Valley with only a couple of 1 minute stops. I ate solely while in the saddle which I've never done before.
    • Splashing in Salt Creek. Words can't even begin to describe how good that felt...
    • Forcing myself to continue at a snails pace along Lion's and Mary's loop to get to the finish line. At that point, I had given up all thoughts about my finishing time/rank, and everything became an intimate and intense personal journey of self-willpower. This certainly felt like the low point of the race at the time, but in retrospect, it has to be a highest point since my body was screaming to take the frontage road, but my mind pointed my bike around Mary's Loop. It sounds like a few of us had very similar personal experiences during those last 10 miles!
    • Eating 2 lbs of watermelon immediately upon finishing.
    • Puking 2 lbs of watermelon thereby curing my debilitating nauseousness from eating it in the first place!



    In-Betweens
    • The guy(s) behind me going up Sand Flats Rd. and then Castleton Gateway Rd. that insisted on riding with their lights on, spraying random light all over the place when the moon was more than enough for the smooth uphills. Yes, I know, I'm a dork. It wouldn't have been a big deal, but I didn't want to fall back, and I wasn't strong enough to pull far ahead...
    • Meeting Rob W. three different times, and asking what his name was all three times. Doh! Sorry Rob! Hopefully we'll meet again so I can ask a 4th time...
    • My front shock seal exploded just before Rabbit Valley and sprayed my front rotor with oil. Fortunately, I was able to force it back on and continue. Compression was good, but rebound was quite clunky.


    Lows
    • Meeting Travis M. and Steve F. on the first gravel downhill. Travis was walking in front, with Steve pushing their two bikes. I immediately stopped and asked if everything was alright. Travis replied nonchalantly, "Oh, I broke my collar bone." That made me far more queasy than he looked! I had no cellphone service either and was just no help to them. In hindsight, I wish I would have given him my longsleeve fleece jacket.
    • Getting chased by that m0th3r fock!ng, big, white sheep dog for about a mile while the sheep herder and his other two dogs just walked along in the distance. He was probably laughing, but my adrenaline and heart rate were higher for that mile than any other time during the race!
    • Running out of gas and starting to cramp on Lion's loop. I had to lay down for over an hour before I could summon the mental stamina to force myself onward.
    • Learning about cheaters at the end, especially after what I had just experienced to get to the finish line.


    Thanks for reading!

    Cheers,
    Stefan

  38. #38
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    KTR Write-Up

    Here's a link to my own journey along the Kokopelli Trail this past weekend:

    http://jesperperl.com/words/ktr/

  39. #39
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    Reading the many stories that are coming out of the race keep bringing up a re-occurring theme. Personal Triumph. People had to dig deep to get to the finish, or however far they got. People learned things about themselves that they hadn't previously known. People overcame doubt, exhaustion, heat, thirst, and the unknown and came out of the race better riders, better people, better competitors.

    For me, like many others, I was at a personal low point struggling through the final 10-15 miles. I had to go to places I didn't know I had to continue onward. Even the very last climb over the graded road and into the finish I had to break up into little pieces. "Get to the bush...ok good, now get to the bend...ok man over the top..."

    I really hope it will be these stories of digging deep that will stick in the minds of people who rode in, and participated in this race. To me, these capture the spirit of the KTR. To try and cheat the race, is cheating your own experience. In the end it is just a bike race. One that gets little to no media coverage, offers no prize, and generates little hype. The experience is the reward, and to cheat yourself out of it undermines the entire purpose for racing in such an event.

    MC, whether you run the race again or not, don't let the ones who cheated themselves out of the great experience get you down. This years KTR exposed a lot of people to a vision that I think you have been trying to share for a long time. Take some satisfaction in knowing that many others are now starting to "get it".

    Some high points for me:

    --The moonlight ride was incredible. Much has been said about it. Words do no justice though.
    --The long and rocky, 29er friendly descent off North Beaver Mesa. It was just plain 'ol fun at that point.
    --Sunrise near Top of The World. Deejay Birtch and I had been yoyo-ing for a while, as the sun rose he said, almost in a whisper "we made it". It was a beautful morning.

    Over the last few days I have been running the race through my head over and over. It has been a life changing day for me. Maybe that sounds dramatic, and perhaps it is. But I now have a tank that is deeper than I ever thought it could be. I know next time when it is time to dig, just how deep I can go.

    Here's to the next ride, and finding new ways to dig deeper than we ever thought possible.

    Thanks Mike.
    Last edited by alizbee; 05-16-2006 at 03:23 PM.
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  40. #40
    Exactly 1/2 of 2-Epic
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    Enjoying the reads...

    Quote Originally Posted by IttyBittyBetty
    Here's a link to my own journey along the Kokopelli Trail this past weekend:

    http://jesperperl.com/words/ktr/
    That sounds like a burly ride, no question! Jen, I think you are too hard on yourself. Conditions were considerably tougher than 2 weeks previous when I pre-rode (and yes that pre-ride was worth a million bucks in the end), and to SS that terrain is just amazing. Lots of great pictures! Thanks for posting those, it was sorta like riding the course again.

    Stephan, your account had me in stitches at times. Salt creek was wonderful, eh? Glad I missed the watermelon...

    I know MC is enjoying all of our accounts of the epic journey, be it physical or mystical...and sharing them is one way we can both show our appreciation for his efforts and let him know he's doing good things.
    Dave

    Anything is possible. The impossible just takes longer.

    2 Epic

  41. #41
    LW Coaching
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    Quote Originally Posted by IttyBittyBetty
    Here's a link to my own journey along the Kokopelli Trail this past weekend:

    http://jesperperl.com/words/ktr/
    Wow, I didn't realize you were on your SS - that is a brave move. Congrats on being gutsy with that. You made it further than any other gal on an SS - mega kudos. Actually you made it further than a few of the SS fellas out there too. What gear were you guys running?

    Nice write up. Thanks for sharing your day.

    LW

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by IttyBittyBetty
    Here's a link to my own journey along the Kokopelli Trail this past weekend:

    http://jesperperl.com/words/ktr/
    Jen -

    I can do nothing but compliment you and Jesper on your attempt! Fantastic sportsmanship, serious drive and tough athleticism highlight your story. You guys are awesome.

    You kept writing that you weren't thinking clearly but I think you made very wise decisions throughout the ride including the one to stop despite what your hearts were set on, the finish. Those are the toughest decisions to make.

    So you may have mixed feelings but I don't. You guys rocked, you accomplished a heck of a ride and you are already looking forward to the next time - nice!

    Congrats and see you out there -

    Ed E
    Last edited by edemtbs; 05-16-2006 at 07:05 PM.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by IttyBittyBetty
    Here's a link to my own journey along the Kokopelli Trail this past weekend:

    http://jesperperl.com/words/ktr/
    Excellent writeup !

    I agree with hairball_dh, you are being way too hard on yourself.
    Think of all the challenges you attempted at once and all on one gear.
    You and Jesper went for it and gave 100%. How great to have a partner
    to share the experience with along with the other racers (even without being able to help each other with support).

    good luck on your next endeavor !
    k

  44. #44
    Cycling, FTW!!
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    Thanks Mike! FYI- Essam Welch is OK

    Thanks for putting the on the race Mike, mid-day Saturday was the most unpleasant few hours of my life. However the feeling of accomplishment I have from surviving the desert is worth every second of agony I went through.
    It definitely sucks that people chose not to fess up to cheating during the race. Asking for support on such a brutal course is not unrealistic due to the harsh conditions, but to lie about it and pretend that you finished by the rules is completely lame.
    After the way the race went this year I totally respect your decision to retire the KTR. But maybe the number of DNF's this year will be a wake up call to anyone who thinks they can just show up and crank out the Kokopelli Trail self-supported.

    FYI- Essam Welch is just fine. I got a message from him on Sunday and it sounds like he had a hell of a day out on course.
    Essam made it to Loma without any outside support at 12:35 AM Sunday. It sounds like he lost some or all of his chainring bolts and he had to finish the race with zip ties holding his chainrings on!!!

    Nice job Essam! 1 week after winning Duo category at 18 hours of Fruita.

    All you single speed racers kicked ass too! I cant begin to imagine how much fun it must have been for you guys and gals.

    -My best memory from the race- Sunrise between Rose Garden Hill and Dewey Bridge. I said to Kevin Gillest, "I sure wish I could enjoy this, but I know how bad it is going to suck from here on out"
    -My worst memory from the race- Riding through the Juniper bushes between Westwater road and Bitter Creek. It must have been 105 degrees with no breeze.

    Thats it for now, see everyone on the trails!

    Marko

  45. #45
    frejwilk
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    Another (very long) personal recap

    I’m usually a lurker in these forums. I enjoy reading the posts, and using the forum to find out about some events I might otherwise miss. It’s important (and nice) to see so many positive posts here, so I’ll add to it, and give my own take on this event.

    I raced the KTR in 2005. I think 15 people started that one, and it seemed like a big field to me. I had high hopes that year. I spent a fair bit of the race riding with or chasing Jon Brown. Ironically, I can probably count the words we shared on my hands. It was a race, and I was doing all I could to keep him in sight! Unfortunately, I missed a turn along the way. I went right by the turn into the small canyon before the ‘Top of the World’ intersection. I kept riding though, and eventually finished in a reasonable time. Due to my mistake I was listed in the results as unclassified. I was disappointed in this, and let Mike (and some others) know it. I did, however, agree with the decision. It would have been nice to have a result to boast about, but at least it didn’t appear anyone thought I was trying to shortcut the course to save time. I definitely didn’t ride the complete route, and it was the right result. I figured I would have 2006 to ride again.

    I was a little more nervous this year with the predicted larger field, many of whom I knew to be very fast from direct experience. For me, this was a huge draw of the 2006 event. It is nice that we’re not riding in circles, paying some outrageous entry fee, digging deep to find our limits, and everything else that accompanies this type of ride. For me though, I was very excited to test myself against several others on this particular, difficult course. I really like the idea that the course is a fixed, known, physical place; the Kokopelli Trail. People can pre-ride it, or not. They can read about it, talk to others who’ve ridden it, and know that others have wondered how fast they can ride it (and will continue to wonder, and try). I wanted it to be a race, not just a long ride. I was excited that there would be such a field present!

    I can’t say that I agreed with the no drafting rule. My opinion was, and is, that there is a big difference between trading pulls to keep the speed up, and fighting not to lose a wheel at crunch time (inevitably at slow speed on a climb). That said, the most important thing here is that if you’ve got your own ideas for the race – great – organize your own race! I admire and respect Mike for having the idea to run this race, and then inviting others (including me) to participate. I lined up at the start in full support of the race as it stands!

    On with the riding part. I wasn’t able to stay with the lead group up Sand Flats road. I eased back, and immediately small groups of riders started to shoot past. I wasn’t too worried, as I had a good pace worked out, and was confident that if I maintained it, I’d place OK. By the time I reached the Kokopelli spur to the loop road, I was feeling much better. The descent, and paved climb went well. I did use my lights the whole way, and hope I didn’t disturb the moonlit night for anyone. I simply didn’t want to focus on any more of the climb than I had to. Past Fisher Mesa, and down off North Beaver Mesa, I couldn’t believe how much of an effort some people were putting in. In particular, the Gary Fisher SS’er I rode with was riding really hard through some obvious difficulties. At the top of Rose Garden hill there were still quite a few more riders near me than I had expected. I pushed on (often literally) through the next section, just hoping to stay consistent. Things were a bit more strung out when I reached the Entrada Bluffs road. I had Jay Petervary, and Ethan Passant for company, and I didn’t miss my turn this time! At Dewey Bridge, we got some misinformation on our placings, although I think the time splits were right. Not that we were soliciting this information. People just kept telling us. At any rate we were placed better than I thought. Ethan was able to pull away at this point. Jay and I were pretty evenly matched though, and it was good to have someone to ride with. We were very conscious to ride beside each other. It was just as helpful for morale to be able to talk and see another rider, as to be obvious about not drafting. It didn’t seem like we were going that fast, but we were still on a good pace. I was secretly hoping and calculating for a 14hr finish. If Jay was having similar thoughts, he didn’t let on. Laid back, and comfortable, are the words that come to my mind to describe him. By the time we reached the singletrack, we had caught Ethan. I’m not sure how much of that was our speed. Probably we were the beneficiaries of the conditions taking their toll on another rider. Whatever the case, Ethan proceeded to give us a demonstration of riding skills down the trail to the creek. The gap was there again when we crossed the bridge. If only I knew others were cooling off here. It never occurred to me. I would suffer from that lack of knowledge shortly. I had been eating and drinking well, and feeling good. Once we started up the hike-a-bikes though, I wilted. The climb up toward the Lions junction was ridiculous. The three of us were all on the hill at the same time, and if there was any film of it, you’d swear we were in slow motion, if moving at all! I finally let Jay by to go on and finish the race in reasonable time. I think he had been hanging back with me for a while to make sure I’d be OK. Once he was gone, I made the decision to try everything I could to recover a bit. I knew that otherwise I would be more or less walking and suffering a lot more than I was prepared for. At this point, I’d reluctantly begun to accept the ‘racing’ part as getting away from me. I sat down, and drank every last bit of drink I had. Most of it was boiling hot energy drink. With the last of my water, I forced down a couple of gels, and that was it. At first I felt a little better. Then it started to get easier to actually ride again. I got back up to a normal pace. I was now inspired by the thought of getting in under 15hrs. Even though I felt good again, I couldn’t let go of the idea that it wasn’t going to last. I passed Ethan less than two miles from the finish, probably. It seemed kind of lame to be ‘racing’ by someone obviously having trouble, so close to the finish. All I wanted was to be done. I figured he’d understand. So I sprinted over the hill to come in under fifteen hours, and take 15min off last year’s time. In the end I was pleased that I had been able to get through such a bad spot. I know others experienced a lot worse. It really is impressive what some battled through. Although I didn't see as many racers as others probably did, I only witnessed people trying their hardest, and riding within the spirit of the event.

    I really enjoyed the atmosphere after the race. Talking to others about their adventure, drinking beers with new friends, getting to talk to others that I don’t see very often. Last year, with the time spread between finishers, and smaller numbers, that whole scene never really happened.

    So, like everyone else, I’m thankful to Mike for organizing the event. It is too bad that the satisfaction is not there for him that a lot of us are able to feel. I hope that can change, or at least ease with some of these race stories. My biggest satisfaction from this year was realizing the chance to ‘officially’ finish. I’m sure there are others who are thinking of this for another potential edition of the KTR. Hopefully others will continue to post experiences and thoughts on this year. It’s a long post. Thanks for reading,

    Fred W.

  46. #46
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    Thanks Mike

    Great job MC. Now that the race is over, I WILL thank you again.

    My writeup and pics are over on the Alaska board at:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=192357

    I really enjoyed reading everyone's thoughts on the race, hope you enjoy mine.

    Adam
    I wanna say I'm sorry for stuff I haven't done yet, things will shortly get completely out of hand --T.M.G.

  47. #47
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    Warm and Fuzzy

    Thanks Lynda, Dave, Ed, and everyone else for making me feel all warm and fuzzy! But seriously, of course I'm too hard on myself. Like most of you who also attempted this ride, I set high expectations for myself. Writing my race report and reading all the others is helping me feel better about my race. However, that accepatance isn't dimishing my resolve to go back, with what I've learned, and complete the race next year.

    FWI Lynda, I rode a 32X20, which I thought was easy enough to lessen the impact of all the climbing. I still think that was the right gearing for me, I just need to improve my climbing. I see a lot of hill work in my future... It's all good - more time on the bike!

    Trail717, Jesper and I are still laughing about getting married at Cisco Landing! We even joked about actually doing it, although it isn't exactly the most romantic spot.

  48. #48
    giddy up!
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    I'm having a hard time understanding why a person would cheat in an event such as this. I can understand how people might find themselves drafting another rider.....it's a long ride and the mind becomes a little fuzzy after awhile.....this is a mistake I could make and hardly even realize it.

    However....I can't understand why you would cut the course or accept food/water/outside support. I think Mike made it pretty clear that outside support meant outside support. There's not alot of gray there.

    I'd like to see those who may have broken the rules(intentionally or unintentionally) own up to it. It doesn't diminish your accomplishment in the least...but it may restore some of the honor in this type of racing and help to keep these events going in the future. I would hate to see such a unique event cease to exist because a few people aren't playing by the rules.

    I had to call off the Koko this year due to a cross country move....but I am already planning for next year....I hope I get the chance.

    Thanks for your efforts Mike,

    B
    www.thepathbikeshop.com

  49. #49
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    Sucker Punched

    The low point (for me) of this year's race was the widespread cheating. With the largest KTR field ever came the largest number of rules infractions ever. I witnessed many racers accepting assistance, drafting, and cutting the course, not to mention the reports/complaints I fielded from other racers of similar instances. When confronted with their infractions, these racers either denied them or tried to rationalize them. I thought long and hard about DQ'ing some of the cheaters, but decided against it. Rather than incur their misplaced wrath and create enemies and bad feelings, I simply listed the time that they crossed the line and I hope that karma sorts them out
    Mike C.

    I don't mean to speak for Mike. He is obviously quite capable. I would just like to point out that as a race promoter and organizer myself, (Trans Iowa) I can tell you that the organization and planning that is necessitated by an event such as this takes alot of time and money. The event takes on a life of it's own and you are intimately wrapped up in it as a promoter. When such a thing happens like it did to Mike, you are devastated. It's personal for me, and I suspect that it might be for Mike as well.

    Why would someone do things outside of the rules of the event? It doesn't really matter. It's done and unless there is repentance on the part of the violators I doubt that anything else will matter.

    The best thing to do is to keep giving back with all your wonderful stories! That's the pay-off for me when I do this sort of thing. I suspect Mike is enjoying all the tales you are telling here, on your blogs, and elsewhere. This has been a great thread to read.

    Sorry to dredge up this again, but I thought that a view from the promoters side of the fence might give some perspective here.

    Carry on!
    Riden' an Smilin'
    Guitar Ted

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  50. #50
    Team Velveeta™
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    photos

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Overall results:
    1) Jon Brown 13:26 (overall course record, single speed course record)
    2) Dave Harris 13:55
    3) Jason Stubbe 14:11
    4) Jay Petervary 14:41
    5) Fred Wilkinson 14:48
    6) Ethan Passant 14:53
    7) Lynda Wallenfels 15:03 (female course record)
    8) Jari Kirkland 16:28
    9) Fred Marmsater 16:29
    10) Adam Lisonbee 17:25
    11) Marko Ross-Bryant 17:31
    12) Rob Writz 17:37
    13) Ed Ellinger 17:42
    14) Stefan Griebel 18:40
    15) Jenna Woodbury 18:59
    16) Keith Richards-Dinger 19:11
    17) Andrew Messassin 19:12
    18) Greg Bachman 19:29
    19) Cat Morrison 20:25
    20) Brad Kee 20:35
    21) Bill Shand 22:11
    22) Pierre Ostor 23:57
    23) Essam Welch 24:30
    24) Erika Van Meter 26:30
    I snapped a few digi photos out on Mary's Loop while waiting for a couple racers to finish. Here they are with the names I'm guessing that belong, based on the finish order:


    Adam Lisonbee?


    Marko Ross-Bryant?


    Rob Writz?


    Ed Ellinger (hey Ed)

    Let me know if I have the names assigned correctly, and I'll get the (big) original photo files to the racers if they'd like.

    I just got back from Fruita. Spent a week including the race weekend. Didn't race, but ran Andrew Mesesan (aka Mesassassin) over to Moab for the start. I got in some huge rides, met some great people, and had a damned nice time.

    I did not get a pre-finishing picture of Andrew, timing wasn't right. But I do have a few pictures of his Karate Monkey with the Soup Can/Hose Clamp/Turnbuckle system he used for keeping the cracked chainstay from going super-critical during the race:



    Now I'm back in "real life", all bruises, bug bites, burns, dirty laundry, creaky bicycle.

    Nice.

    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

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    17) Andrew Messassin 19:12 - soup can and a single speed - just sick... I am in awe! The picture really brings it home...

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    Wink Too much time to think on the way to work today!

    In the light of day, after a period of recovery and some time to reflect with legs twitching and mind itching, I have some further analysis of my ride and the decisions I made before embarking. Obviously most of these are related to going faster. The single most important thing for me was the excessive weight I carried from the start. I had a plan and I stuck with it but in retrospect I would make some changes. So for those of you who attempt this in the future some thoughts:

    Bike = perfect with some notes below. Steel, 29'er is the bomb for this course! Thanks Walt!

    Singlespeed, would I do it again? = absofreakin'lutely!

    Gear selected, would I change it? = absofreakin'lutely! I went with 34/18, I think 34/20 or possibly even 32/20 would work better despite the long flat sections. I was disappointed I could not pedal up some of the stuff I know I should and could have. And I think I would have been fresher when I hit Salt Creek.

    Rigid, good idea? = Hmmm, tough one. I definitely think I'd go faster with a suspension fork but I love the simplicity and directness of a solid fork. I was not as impacted by the rigid ride as I expected to be. This one is tough.

    Water, good strategy? = Probably not. I carried 300 ozs. on my back at the start. I would drop 130 ozs. immediately and save almost 10 lbs. right off the bat. I would stop and I would filter. Iodine tabs might also work and are quicker. Jon is a freak!

    Food, good strategy? = Yes and no. I had good food (mostly in the form of liquid, gel and bananas), I just carried a little too much and could save weight here too. I always eat less than I expect. And electrolytes were essential.

    Tools and gear, good strategy? = Yes and no. I did not need a damn thing but I'm glad I had it! I'd drop a few things from the emergency kit and save even more weight.

    Clothing, enough or too much? = Again, yes and no. I carried a shell and knee warmers that I never needed but would probably take them again. What I wore worked perfectly except the shoes. I would choose shoes that you can hike better in, the loose, rocky hike-a-bikes take a toll in the shoes I wore.

    Lights, adequate? = Perfect. Minimal use w/ full moon out but there when I needed it. Although I'd prefer not to have to carry that damn battery, boy was I glad to have a good strong light on the tech stuff and fast descents.

    Pre-rides = priceless!

    I-pod = priceless!

    Salt Creek, should I have stopped? = Yes! Just a quick stop to soak my head, neck and shoulders would have done wonders for the next section. This depends on the weather of course.

    So that's all I can think of for now. 11-1/2 months to go before.......I can try again as part of the same excellent race? Maybe, or maybe I just cook it alone.

    Ed E
    Last edited by edemtbs; 05-19-2006 at 09:02 AM.

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    KTR support group

    Quote Originally Posted by edemtbs
    So that's all I can think of for now. 11-1/2 months to go before.......I can try again as part of the same excellent race? Maybe, or maybe I just cook it alone.

    Ed E
    That's what this thread is becoming, a place for all of us who schemed, trained, learned, and were generally obsessed with all involved in the KTR for weeks (or months) previous to stay connected & share experiences.

    The race itself happened in the blink of an eye, albiet a hot bloodshot one

    Ed, I'm sure you won't be alone.

    While we're carrying this conversation on...I'm considering another run at the KT in late September. It'd be a perfect shakedown for one of the more popular regional circles of dizziness events.

    Anyone want to hit in September?
    Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by hairball_dh
    ...I'm considering another run at the KT in late September. It'd be a perfect shakedown for one of the more popular regional circles of dizziness events.

    Anyone want to hit in September?
    I for one am planning on a Sept ride , to far away for me to worry yet about actual day(s). However there is a full Moon on Thursday Sept 7th, no moon on the 22nd.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hairball_dh
    That's what this thread is becoming, a place for all of us who schemed, trained, learned, and were generally obsessed with all involved in the KTR for weeks (or months) previous to stay connected & share experiences.
    Hi, my name is Adam, and I have been obsessed with the KTR since December.....

    Ed your strategy with food and water is like mine. I had a filter for "just in case". Next time, If I bring it I will plan to use it. I think I culd have shed ~8 lbs from my pack in food, water and gear....knowing what I know now!

    September could work for another run. My schedule gets crowded though with the E100 Aug 26, and then the 24 Hours of Soldier Hollow Sept 9th. Maybe a late Sept run?

    I am also thinking of some partial KT trips, Dewey-->Moab for example, as well as taking some time to enjoy the route, camping in Fisher Valley or at Top of the World etc...

    And seriously, I am having withdrawal symptoms...
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    Next Time

    Quote Originally Posted by edemtbs
    In the light of day, after a period of recovery and some time to reflect with legs twitching and mind itching, I have some further analysis of my ride and the decisions I made before embarking. ...........So that's all I can think of for now. 11-1/2 months to go before.......I can try again as part of the same excellent race? Maybe, or maybe I just cook it alone.
    Ed E
    Next Time, I have also been playing this game.

    Bike … FS for me, I pre-rode the trail on a 26 in FR steel frame, it worked very well but is to harsh for my 50 yr old back after about 8 hrs. I only rode for 12hrs but my new FS had my back and rear end in great shape. My only bike problem was drivetrain related totally my fault for not getting the new bike dialed in better pre-race.

    Food… I carried way to much but will carry the same, hammer products, especially the electrolyte pills, also a couple of Ritz peanut butter cracker packs, got to be Ritz

    Gear…no real change

    Lights… I made a big error here; I used just a helmet light, left my HID home. I had pre –ridden the course so I thought with my slow climbing I would not do much night time descending. Also trail conditions on my pre-ride descent of Beaver Mesa led me to think the helmet light would handle it at the start/top section. Wrong on both counts, I climbed/topped out faster than planned for and had over 1.5 hrs of night left. Then during the descent the second ‘moon dust sand trap’ tossed me to the ground hard. During my early pre ride there were virtually no sand traps on this section of the trail, during the race there were many. After my crash I was too scared to go fast till first light. With my HID I know I would have been faster and safer.

    Water…. This time I changed my water strategy last minute to go with no filter. So I carried 150 oz in my camel back and two large water bottles. My plan was to save filtering time and make it to Westwater. When I abandoned at Cisco Landing I still had two full water bottles, this would have been enough water to carry me to Westwater but I could not get my mind around drinking this hot hot water. In terms of weight and capacity it was not a bad plan. Also because I used two bladders I knew exactly how much water was still in my pack when the first bladder ran out. However next time I will carry a filter to use at either Dewy, McGraw or Cisco. This way after I filter water too my pack I will have some COOL water to hit the desert with instead of hot plastic water bottle water. Also if I am hot I will use the cold river water to cool way down and get me ready for the heat. Since I dropped out due to the heat this is a big deal for me.

    IPod…. I loved my Ipod but ran out of battery. Way back during my pre-ride I had a pre-picked a spot at the top of the last climb out of McGraw to stop, drink and turn my Ipod back on…only to discover my batteries were dead. (this is the real reason I abandoned at Cisco, no tunes for the ride from Cisco to Westwater) So next time an extra set of batteries.

    Clothing… Only change would be to maybe leave out the leg warmers

    Pre-Ride… my hats off to any and all who raced with out pre-riding. I would have been off course and confused several times. Also because the climbs were all known I never had the feeling that comes from topping out a false top.

    Tires…. I went with Stans and small/light tires (Kenda 2.0) and about 40psi, all to help a little on the initial climbs. These tires worked well for the pre-ride trail conditions. Not sure if I will change, I could have used a bigger tire to handle the high speed stuff coming down Beaver Mesa… but overall I did not have any problems with the sand through Yellow Jacket, or any other tire issues. But am not sure about this one, might have to re-visit the area this summer with some 2.10’s
    Last edited by trail717; 05-19-2006 at 05:38 PM.

  57. #57
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    I'm up for an attempt in September! Lets keep that thought alive.

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    Sept

    I would be up fpr a go at the kt in Sept.

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    The late September KTR thought bubble is definitely in my head - let's stay in touch and see what happens.

    Ed E

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    Hi Lynda,

    Read your report, nice one, and CONGRATULATIONS on your finish!

    Lee

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    Quote Originally Posted by hairball_dh
    While we're carrying this conversation on...I'm considering another run at the KT in late September. It'd be a perfect shakedown for one of the more popular regional circles of dizziness events.

    Anyone want to hit in September?
    Me, me!

    ..and I'm gonna do it on my 29er SS

    LW

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyndaW
    Me, me!

    ..and I'm gonna do it on my 29er SS

    LW
    Oh great! Now you'll kick my ass on my home bike turf too

    And here I thought I could coast from now until September. Hope to see you guys at other events this year (Vapor Trail maybe?).

    Ed E

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    September sounds fun. I'd be excited to do it. The weekend of the 7th isn't free for me, again. I might be heading out there this weekend to spend some time on the trail though...
    On-One Lurcher SS
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  64. #64
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    possible dates

    Quote Originally Posted by Pivvay
    September sounds fun. I'd be excited to do it. The weekend of the 7th isn't free for me, again. I might be heading out there this weekend to spend some time on the trail though...
    I couldn't do it the 7th either. The only times that'd work for me are somewhere between Sep 23 and Oct 1. The full moon was really cool...I mean *****in...going late Sep would just mean we'll have to have good lights. Seeing how I've processed my own feedback on my lights from KTR and have upgraded them again, no problem for me
    Dave

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    I can have lights ready by then for sure. Around Sept 23rd is probably ideal for me being a month of time off after my really busy August and getting me ready for Moab...
    On-One Lurcher SS
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  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by hairball_dh
    The only times that'd work for me are somewhere between Sep 23 and Oct 1.
    Those dates are good for me also, better than early Sept. for sure.

    Ed E

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    Quote Originally Posted by hairball_dh
    I couldn't do it the 7th either. The only times that'd work for me are somewhere between Sep 23 and Oct 1. The full moon was really cool...I mean *****in...going late Sep would just mean we'll have to have good lights. Seeing how I've processed my own feedback on my lights from KTR and have upgraded them again, no problem for me

    Late Sept could work for me.

    Also, Chris and Dave, I am relying on you guys to have a sweet LED set up that I can just pay you to build me. So chop chop! Get those protos done!
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    Nice article by Travis Macy

    Just discovered this article in the Boulder Daily Camera. If the website asks you to sign in, use "bs at bs.com" as the email addy, and "bs" as the passwd.

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    Just got this from Bill Shand...

    __________________________________________________ ___________________________

    Kokopelli Trail Race

    Mountain Bike Racing at Its Purest

    By Bill Shand

    No entry fee. No prizes. No checkpoints. No outside support of any kind. This is the Kokopelli Trail Race, one of the purest mountain races that I have ever heard of. The organizer, Mike Curiak, believes strongly in self supported racing and that is what this event is all about.

    The trail starts in Moab, Utah travels over the La Sal mountains, goes through the desert along the Colorado River and finishes up in Loma, Colorado, just outside of Grand Junction. For me, this race is an escape from life. Work commitments during the past six months forced me to skip the entire winter racing season and to skip a family vacation that was planned. With the work issues resolved, I knew that I needed some away time. Some people go to the beach in Mexico. I prefer Moab.

    Pierre Ostor is one of only four finishers from the 2005 Kokopelli Trail Race. I teamed up with him to share in the cost of getting to the start line. In a race like this, there is no trail sweeper coming to pick you up if things go badly. You need to come up with your own emergency plan. Our emergency plan was simple: Hope that you are in cell phone range and call Cheryl, Pierre's wife, to come pick you up. Hopefully you have some clue where you are when you make the call.

    We arrived in Moab mid afternoon on May 12th. We checked into the hotel, assembled the bikes, and encountered our first problem of the race. This is not good since the race did not start yet. The pedal threads on Pierre's bike crank stripped during assembly making the bike unusable. Luckily, there are many bike shops in Moab so finding a replacement crank was pretty straight forward.

    With Pierre's problem solved, now it was my turn. Every rotation of my rear wheel produced a strange clanking noise. Try as we might, we could not figure out where the noise was coming from. I decided to use a strategy that I once used with an old car that I drove. Ignore the noise and there is a good chance that it will just go away. This strategy worked about 75% of the time.

    We went for dinner, slept for a couple of hours, and at 10:00pm started getting dressed for biking. Did I mention that this race starts at midnight?

    Water is a major issue. There is only one guaranteed spot to get clean water and it is several miles off the course. I decided to err on the side of caution and carry enough water to last me for the entire race, 8.25 litres. That is 18 lbs. of water. I also carried enough food to last me for 27 hours, repair tools, a first aid kit, a Petzl helmet light, a compass, and a map. I own a GPS but had no reference points so I decided not to carry it.

    My strategy was simple. Finish unless your body or bike is broken. Based on last year's drop out statistics, simply finishing would place me high in the overall standings. This may sound like a very easy strategy to follow but the real meaning is not easy at all. It means that no matter how uncomfortable things get, you must continue. In events like this, things can get incredibly uncomfortable.

    We arrived at the Slick Rock Trail Head in Moab at 11:00pm. I've been reading about this spot for years in various mountain biking publications. It is considered one of the best mountain biking trails on the planet. I was both excited and scared. Excited to be in Moab. Scared of everything else.

    Fear is normal before a race but I have not felt like this in years. Fear of climbing the mountain range in the dark. Fear of riding through the desert heat with no place to get water and no one to help in the event of a problem. Fear of getting lost and not being able to find my way to safety. Perhaps most of all, fear of failure.

    I talked to Mike Curiak briefly before the start. The last ten miles of the trail were famous for not being well marked. I asked Mike if there was any trick to finding my way. "Stay to the right except for the places where you have to stay left." Very helpful.

    Mike asked if Pierre and I would be travelling together. We had not discussed this at all. We looked at each other and both answered, "No." The self supported nature of this race was appealing to both of us. Intentionally travelling together would spoil that and to me seemed like cheating.

    GO!

    At midnight, 56 riders took off into the darkness. This is up from only 15 racers the year before. A full moon was out and it was so bright that no headlight was required on the uphill sections of the course. The air was cool but very dry. As soon as I started breathing hard, I could feel my mouth dry out. I sipped water and found a comfortable climbing rhythm. The first 13 miles of the course consisted of a 4000 foot climb so finding a comfortable pace was pretty important. Going too hard now would have very negative consequences later.

    For a while I climbed with a local guy who lived just outside Denver. He told me a story about himself and his friend training on the trail two weeks prior. His friend became so dehydrated that his kidneys failed and he had to be hospitalized. The friend was not at the start line today. This only reinforced my decision to not fool around when it came to water. We rode together for a little while but eventually he dropped me and I rode through the night by myself. There were always lights ahead and behind me but not really with me.

    The 4000 ft climb ended and the road immediately pointed down. I was using my medium powered light to conserve weight so it really was not adequate for fast downhill riding. I kept the brakes on and let people with the powerful lights fly by me. We descended about 2000 ft and the trail pointed up again. I shut the light off and climbed by moonlight again. 2000 more ft up. This was non-technical riding and was generally pretty easy, except for the up part.

    The trail eventually turned downward again and became a bit rougher. I passed two riders standing beside the trail. I wasn't sure why they were there but they waved to me and I waved back. I found out later that one of them had a separated shoulder due to a crash. The second person, Steve Fassbinder, dropped out of the race to assist the guy. They eventually made their way to a road and got a ride.

    Shortly after passing them, I began to think that I was on the wrong trail. This was a fast downhill section but no one was passing me. I also couldn't see any light ahead. I must be on the wrong trail. I turned around and started climbing back up the mountain. After about five minutes, three riders came flying down the hill. They must have wondered why I was going the wrong way. I turned around and followed but they were soon out of site. I decided to stop second guessing myself and follow my instincts from now on.

    The trail became rougher and I was finding it really hard to see the deep ruts that periodically covered the trail. My wheel suddenly pulled left and I felt myself heading for the ground. First my right leg hit, then my hip, then my shoulder, and finally my head scraped along the gravel. My light went out and I laid there for a minute trying to figure out if anything was broken. When I stood up, my light came back on. Lucky. I checked myself over and found cuts on my leg and hip but nothing that needed stitches. My helmet wasn't cracked and my shoulder was sore but seemed fine. I hopped on my bike and continued on.

    After only a few minutes, my right hand felt wet. I stopped to see what was going on and saw that it was totally soaked in blood. This can't be good. I used a bit of precious water to wash the blood away and found a tiny puncture wound on my baby finger. How could a cut so small bleed so much? I applied direct pressure until it stopped and continued on. I decided to put a Band-Aid on if it started bleeding again but otherwise do without. (The cut started bleeding again two days later during supper at a restaurant, weird.)

    I continued down the mountain wishing that I brought my good light. I estimate that I could have gone twice as fast and been safer in the process. Daylight couldn't come fast enough, even though I knew that it would bring another problem, heat.

    Dawn came and I was finally able to let go of the brakes. This is always my favourite part of the day to ride. I was having a ball. Great trail, cool air, fantastic scenery, food was still tasting good, the water situation was under control, and the bike was working flawlessly (except for the rear wheel clank which was ever present). I pedalled hard, trying to make up for some of the time I lost during the night.

    By 6:00 am my sunglasses were on and I was stripped down to just shorts and a jersey. I started drinking water every ten minutes in an effort to stay hydrated. At one point I came to a high ridge and looked back at the trail behind me. I could see for miles. There was no one in view. I looked ahead and could see for miles. There was no one in view. As I snapped some photos, I realized that I had not seen another rider since 3:00am. I also came to the realization that I would likely be riding alone for the rest of the race.

    At around 9:00am I did catch up to another rider. Actually, he was walking. The rear shock on his bike had blown up making the bike unusable. His plan was to walk to Dewey Bridge and find a ride from there.

    Dewey Bridge is the only place that the race crosses the Colorado River. It is a bit of a milestone in the race because it marks the end of the mountain portion of the trail and the start of the desert. When I arrived at Dewey Bridge, it was getting really hot outside. I crossed the bridge and began climbing the single track on the other side. Shade was pretty hard to come by so when I finally came to a small tree I stopped to have a drink and put on some more sun screen. The heat seemed to radiate from the sky and from the earth both. It was unrelenting. There was almost no air movement.

    I continued on, walking all steep hills. The energy expanded to climb difficult hills just didn't seem worth it. At this point I was caught by a rider from Michigan. He had been ahead of me but he stopped at Dewey Bridge for about 45 min so I guess that I must have passed him there. We were riding at pretty much the same speed so we travelled together for a while.

    Each small valley that we travelled through seemed to be completely empty of any wind. At the top of each hill there was a slight breeze which tried to evaporate every bit of sweat all at once. The cooling effect that this produced felt so good. Unfortunately, it would only last for about 10 seconds. Then the reality of the heat returned.

    We rode together until a place called Cisco Takeout where we came upon a rider standing on the side of the road. When we stopped to see what he was doing, he told us that he had enough and he was calling his wife to come pick him up. We told him that the river was just down the hill. He could filter water and cool off but he wanted nothing to do with it. He said that the heat was killing him. We continued on to the river where Michigan guy wanted to stop to filter water. My water supply was still OK so I left him there and went on by myself.

    About an hour after Cisco Takeout I stopped to pee. I checked the clock and realized that it had been seven hours since I last went. The urine was a deep, dark yellow, almost orange actually. This can't be good. I took a little rest, drank a lot, and tried to eat a granola bar but I was no longer producing saliva so it would not dissolve in my mouth. I chewed and chewed but the bar just sat there, almost like I had crumbled it up in my hands. I squirted some water in my mouth and this helped a bit. After about five minutes of this I managed to swallow the whole thing.

    Even though I was drinking lots, it was obvious that I was badly dehydrated. I made the decision to head for Westwater Station even though it would take me a couple of miles off course. I had enough water to finish the race at my current rate of consumption. The problem was that my current rate of consumption was not nearly enough. I needed an immediate injection of about a gallon. Yes, a gallon would be perfect.

    At the turn off to Westwater, two riders were there with a van. One rider's wife had come to pick them up. They were both dropping out of the race. I told them my plan to drink a gallon of water at the Station. The rider's wife offered me some of her water and when I declined, she realized that I would be disqualified if I accepted. "Oops! Sorry!" she said. That ice cold water looked so good. I double checked that I was going the right way to Westwater Station and rolled on.

    Westwater Station is a small ranger station with a boat launch onto the Colorado River. The ranger station has an out door potable water spigot. I found it immediately and drank a litre on the spot. I tried to drink more but my stomach would not accept it. There was a picnic table in the shade beside the boat launch so I decided to take a break and force myself to drink two more water bottles. I sipped the water, ate a bit of food and laid my head down on the table.

    I must have dosed off for a few minutes because I was startled awake by the sound of girls talking. I opened my eyes and looked out onto the river to see a raft piloted by five girls in string bikinis. If you have read any of my previous stories, you may be thinking, "Bill is hallucinating again." I thought the same thing but when they docked the raft right beside me, unloaded their coolers of beer, and talked to me, I was pretty sure that the whole event was real. Since I was now wide awake, I figured that I may as well keep going so I finished my water, refilled most of my bottles, and hit the trail again.

    After about half an hour I caught up to Michigan guy. He was coming back down the trail toward me. I asked what was going on and he said that he was done. He could go no further. He leaned over the handle bars and showed me his legs. The muscles in his thighs were contracting uncontrollably. It is a sight that I have never seen before and will never forget. He was in very bad condition. I guy on a four wheeler came by and offered to drive Michigan Guy to Westwater Station where he could get more water and call for a ride. This was the first four wheeler that I had seen so far. Meeting him at this moment was a real stroke of luck and certainly saved Michigan Guy a lot of grief. I wished him well and headed down the trail to the next major intersection called Rabbit Valley.

    Rabbit Valley is a desert recreation area so the closer that I got, the more complicated it became to follow the correct trail since there were a multitude of trails to choose from. On several occasions, I headed down the wrong path and had to back track when I realized my error. Eating was also still a problem. Even with all of the water that I consumed at Westwater, I still wasn't producing any saliva.

    I met two riders just before Rabbit Valley. They were not part of the race but came to the area for the weekend to do some riding. We chatted for a while and I confirmed that I was headed in the right direction. They asked how long I had been riding and were shocked when I told them 18 hours. They said that I only had twenty miles to go which was nothing compared to what I had already been through. Even though I had already ridden for 120 miles, twenty more seemed like an insurmountable obstacle in this heat. I told myself over and over, "You didn't drop out in Alaska because it was too cold, your not dropping out in the desert because it is too hot!" This rant wore thin after a while but seemed to get me through that tough period.

    At the Rabbit Valley parking lot, I stopped again to rest and eat in the shade. I closed my eyes and dosed off for about five minutes. I woke up and said out loud, "I need to finish this thing now!" There was no one there to hear me.

    The trail out of Rabbit valley was smooth and easy to follow for about ten miles. Then it abruptly ended. Up until now the trail was marked with a specific marker but now there was none. I consulted my map, found a side trail that seemed to be in the correct location, and followed it into a small canyon. At the bottom there was a trail marker so I am sure that I was on the right path. After that trail marker, everything is a blur.

    I followed the trail as best I could. I stayed right most of the time. I took the occasional left when it seemed appropriate. I have absolutely no idea where I was. At times it seemed like I was not even on a trail at all. At times it seemed like I was going in completely the wrong direction. It got dark which made navigating even more difficult. After several hours of mostly walking, I arrived at the finish line. I have no idea how I got there. It was 10:11pm. The race took me 22 hours and 11 minutes.

    I looked for Mike Curiak's truck but could not find it so I went to talk to a guy sitting in a van near the trail head. He was waiting for his wife to finish the race. He told me that Mike left an hour before I arrived. He asked if I saw his wife and when I told him that I had not seen a female rider since 3:00am, he looked a bit concerned. "She is strong, she will be fine," he said. I hoped so. That was one difficult trail.

    I called Cheryl to come pick me up and immediately fell asleep on the gravel beside the husband's van. When Cheryl arrived, I was startled and got up quickly to load all of my gear. I don't know why I was in a hurry. The race was over. Anyway, my body revolted. Actually, my stomach revolted. It did what I can only describe as an inversion, as in, turned itself inside out. I had to vomit immediately. There was nothing. No food, no water, no nothing. Nothing came up. My stomach was completely empty. Good thing I finished when I did because I was definitely running on empty.

    24 riders finished out of the 56 who started. I placed 21st. I know that I made some mistakes that I could correct and improve my time the next time. My rear wheel clanked all through the race but worked perfectly. When I arrived home and reassembled my bike, the noise was gone.

    How hot was it? I've heard various reports about the temperature that day, the highest being +98F. Just another ordinary day in the desert.

    Unfortunately, Mike has stated that he will never organize this race again. It seems that he witnessed some people who did not adhere to the strict self supported rule. This is a violation of the very nature of the event. It is beyond cheating. The disappointment of seeing this on more than one occasion has caused him to reconsider how he organizes events. There will never be another Kokopelli Trail Race.

    Recovery

    Once at the hotel I slowly started drinking and eating. At 6:00am I went for breakfast and at 9:00am I went for second breakfast. Between the two breakfasts, I drank five 16 ounce glasses of orange juice. It seemed like the more that I drank, the thirstier I became. At 1:00pm, Pierre and I went for ice cream at Wendy's and ended up ordering half of the items on the menu (Pierre finished just before midnight, one position behind me). At 5:00pm hunger struck again so we went for a monster meal at a restaurant in Grand Junction with some of the other people in the race. After supper we all went to a speciality ice cream shop for more dessert. When I went to bed that evening I still felt slightly hungry but mostly I felt satisfied at having completed a very difficult event. Most importantly, I had a great adventure and got the vacation that I was looking for.

    Mike, if you are reading this, I urge you to reconsider.

    ~Bill
    __________________________________________________ _________

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