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  1. #1
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    Epiphany seat location

    Hallo fellow bikers.
    I just finished building Epiphany, I got 19" green ( I am 6'2" and around 205lbs)
    After the first trial ride it seems like my but wants to go back more, I switched from an old 1995 Trek 9000ZX hardtail. It seems that on my old bike I was able to lift up the front wheel with less power put on the pedal. I already have the Tompson set back seat post and my seddle is moved all the way back. Is there any other seat post out there to move the saddle even more back, more over the rear wheel? Or this is just how this bike is setup and this is the way it should be? Any feedback is greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Idea!

    Merdas,

    Your 1st problem is that you haven't posted any pictures of your new greeen Large Epi - Shame on you, have you no class??

    What size stem are you running on the new Epi? Do you have un-usually long arms?

    The main issue is that you are still adapted to riding a bike from 1995. Design philosophies have changed quite a bit since then and what you are experiencing is exactly the problem of my old Litespeed Owl Hollow - The seat was designed to be positioned too far behind the pedals, and it didn't allow for you to achieve maximum power. I had to ride that bike with the seat pushed waaaay forward. Give the positioning of the Epi a few rides before you go for more setback than a Thomson, you should be feeling a lot more torque to the pedals (with no added effort). Do know this, I've heard that any more setback than what is offered on the Thomson could cause issues with your warrenty through Ellsworth.

    If you want to wheelie easier, just put a few spacers under the stem and the front end magically gets "super light" for your wheelie manuvers.

    I hope that you've had this bike fitted to you, if not it is relatively cheap to go to a good bike shop and have it fitted. Or take some profile pics of you on it and lets us all critiuque you. (but that could get nasty )
    Hydrate or Die Trying

  3. #3
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    Thank you very much PAINpusher.
    Ofcourse that I will post some pictures as soon as I figure out how to do it.
    My stem is 130mm with 5 degree rise. Front fork steerer (Fox vanilla 130 RLC) has been cut about 3/4" and I hace 3 spacer below stem and 1 above.
    What eare your thouth?

  4. #4
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    Here are some pictures:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
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    i noticed the same thing when test riding a small moment yesterday. i really wanted to push my butt back off the seat. to compare i jumped on a santa cruz and it was the same deal. funny thing is, i remember when i got my giant back in 02 thinking the seat is too far back, and i do tend to push the seat pretty far forward to get some leaverage over the pedals. problem was solved on the moment by cranking the seat up as high as i would a road bike. dunno how that would play on the trails though.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for your input Metaldork.
    My seatpost is already up high that I barly tuoch ground with my toes.

  7. #7
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    Sounds like painpusher is right, your trying to adapt your XC position from your old hardtail to a 5" trail bike with different geometry and a shorter(?) TT.

    Your saddle is probably more even with the height of the bars compared to your old hardtail correct? If so, you might try raising the nose of the saddle cause you most likely have a more upright position on the new bike which could be giving you that feeling of wanting to sit farther back on the saddle.

  8. #8
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    I think you are right, my hardail saddle is higher that the handle bars and on the Epi it is pretty even. Does this mean that I will not be able to achive the same snappy acceleration and ease of pulling the whell up on this bike then I was abble on my old hardtail?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by merdas
    I think you are right, my hardail saddle is higher that the handle bars and on the Epi it is pretty even. Does this mean that I will not be able to achive the same snappy acceleration and ease of pulling the whell up on this bike then I was abble on my old hardtail?
    They are different beasts, your new bike is not gonna accelerate like a hardtail but it will do things your hardtail never could, you need to adapt and put some time on the new bike more than anything.

    Your riding style will change with the added suspension and you should be able to lift your front wheel over obstacles no problem, the longer fork and more upright position will make it more of an effort to lift the front wheel but you will probably find yourself not needing to lift the wheel as much and just riding thru obstacles with the suspension.

    Try raising the nose of the saddle to get rid of that feeling of wanting to sit farther back but make sure the fore/aft is correct for your position, maybe the 19" size is too small for your height??
    Last edited by rr; 01-08-2006 at 12:14 PM.

  10. #10
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    What does this "fore/aft"mean? I am 6'2' and this size should be fine for my height(this the biggest size)
    Quote Originally Posted by rroeder
    They are different beasts, your new bike is not gonna accelerate like a hardtail but it will do things your hardtail never could, you need to adapt and put some time on the new bike more than anything.

    Your riding style will change with the added suspension and you should be able to lift your front wheel over obstacles no problem, the longer fork and more upright position will make it more of an effort to lift the front wheel but you will probably find yourself not needing to lift the wheel as much and just riding thru obstacles with the suspension.

    Try raising the nose of the saddle to get rid of that feeling of wanting to sit farther back but make sure the fore/aft is correct for your position, maybe the 19" size is too small for your height??

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by merdas
    What does this "fore/aft"mean? I am 6'2' and this size should be fine for my height(this the biggest size)
    Fore/aft just means forward/backward on the seat rails to get the right position, if the seat is too far forward then raising the nose of the saddle won't help. Sorry, not trying to spook you, I'm the same height as you and a 19" might be a tad small for our size, but I'm not familiar with the geometry on the Epiphany and if it's the largest size then I'm sure your fine.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by merdas
    What does this "fore/aft"mean? I am 6'2' and this size should be fine for my height(this the biggest size)
    What is your inseam?

    I am guessing the frame is plenty big for you (24.5" top tube is LONG!!!!). I'm 6' and riding the 17" Epi.

    You need to start weenign yourself off of that xc racer boy position. You will have so much more fun, confidence, and comfort once you adjust to a more upright position. The way I see it, if your not XC sponsored, you may as well be comfy on your bike.

    I STRONGLY suggest that you slowly adjust to a more upright position by starting with the stem. This bike is designed for an approximately 70-110mm length stem. So take steps in small jumps. Start by getting a 120mm stem with 6-10 deg. rise. With this rise, you will be able lower your stem and not require you to use so many spacers, but retain the same height. Nextly, move your seat foward just a hair and start riding like that for a bit. Have your buddy see what you look like when you are on the bike.

    Forget about your old bike, it's with without a doubt dated geometry now.

    Hope this helps, you got a sweet bike, we just need to get you positioned a little better to hit the trails!!

    P.S. Here's what my bike is currently looking like (i think i'll be keeping this geometry for now - I played abit with it when I got it.)
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    Hydrate or Die Trying

  13. #13
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    Yeah, 24.5" TT is plenty long for your height. There are a lot of variables with a right fit but I agree with Painpusher that a 130mm stem is a bit long for a 5" trail bike.

    That TT length and stem length should not require you to run a setback post with the saddle all the way back on the rails at your height though, thats a bit confusing. I'm the same height and I know I would be way stretched out on that setup, and I have a long torso/short legs with a 34" inseam.

  14. #14
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    ///M badge on your vee-dub???????

    dude, that is a serious crime against automotive ethics... not to mention that those that know will laugh at you...

    REMOVE

    REMOVE ASAP!!!!!!!

    PLEASE...


    Quote Originally Posted by PAINpusher
    What is your inseam?

    I am guessing the frame is plenty big for you (24.5" top tube is LONG!!!!). I'm 6' and riding the 17" Epi.

    You need to start weenign yourself off of that xc racer boy position. You will have so much more fun, confidence, and comfort once you adjust to a more upright position. The way I see it, if your not XC sponsored, you may as well be comfy on your bike.

    I STRONGLY suggest that you slowly adjust to a more upright position by starting with the stem. This bike is designed for an approximately 70-110mm length stem. So take steps in small jumps. Start by getting a 120mm stem with 6-10 deg. rise. With this rise, you will be able lower your stem and not require you to use so many spacers, but retain the same height. Nextly, move your seat foward just a hair and start riding like that for a bit. Have your buddy see what you look like when you are on the bike.

    Forget about your old bike, it's with without a doubt dated geometry now.

    Hope this helps, you got a sweet bike, we just need to get you positioned a little better to hit the trails!!

    P.S. Here's what my bike is currently looking like (i think i'll be keeping this geometry for now - I played abit with it when I got it.)

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by osokolo
    dude, that is a serious crime against automotive ethics... not to mention that those that know will laugh at you...

    REMOVE

    REMOVE ASAP!!!!!!!

    PLEASE...
    C'mon Osokolo, Crack a smile, have some fun - That's just the point, those that know should realize the humor in the M tag on this car.

    If you could see the entire car it would make more sense. It's the simple 4 cylinder 4-door no frills gulf - it doesn't even have real wheels, just hub caps! I found the tag on the trail and my wife thought it would be funny on her car...I agreed.
    Hydrate or Die Trying

  16. #16
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    found it on the trail???

    Quote Originally Posted by PAINpusher
    C'mon Osokolo, Crack a smile, have some fun - That's just the point, those that know should realize the humor in the M tag on this car.

    If you could see the entire car it would make more sense. It's the simple 4 cylinder 4-door no frills gulf - it doesn't even have real wheels, just hub caps! I found the tag on the trail and my wife thought it would be funny on her car...I agreed.
    i guess someone had it on his, or more likely, on her bike...

    as long as you didnt take it off of someone's bimmer...

    i still wouldnt put it on my / her car... some BMW owner whose badge was stolen, might take it as an offence...

    here is my smile:

  17. #17
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    I think your bike will be the right size once you get the fit sorted out. After fitting myself to a bunch of bikes, I've adopted the following method.

    First. Find the right seat height. A good place to start is the 0.883 times your true inseam (LeMond method) measured in stocking feet using a book with an inch wide spine pulled firmly into your crotch. I use this with my kids and their pedaling styles have adapted to this position. Every 4-6 months, I'd do another fit and adjust their saddles as they grew. A second method is to pedal with your heels on the pedals and find the height that just allows you to pedal without rocking your hips. Those methods always felt low to me because I pedal with my toes slightly down, so I actually did video of myself pedaling on a trainer while adjusting the saddle height. I raised the saddle until I got a 25 degree angle at my knee at the bottom of my pedalstroke. I came up with 79 centimeters from the center of the crank spindle. My inseam is 34 inches, so that is a 0.915 ratio for me. I use this height on all my bikes. I have a gravity dropper post on my biggest bike so I can lower the saddle for stunts and such. I feel best pedaling with the height at this 79 cm setting. If you were perfectly happy with the height of your previous bike's saddle you can use that setting.

    I then attach my handlebar to a Salsa size-a-matic adjustable stem and guess at a setting to get started. If you don't have such a stem, put something on just to get started.

    Next, I get on my bike with the front and rear suspension properly sagged. I pedal forward with my right leg and stop with the crank horizontal. My wife helps spot from the side and I adjust the saddle fore and aft in the post rails until the tibial tuberosity of my knee is just over the pedal spindle using a plumb bob. The t. tuberosity is the bump in the midline of your lower leg just below the kneecap. This is called the KOPS (knee over the pedal spindle) method. It has been criticized by some, especially Keith Bontrager, but it works very well for me and many others. If you want to duplicate your previous riding position, measure the distance from the plumb line to the pedal spindle on your old bike and duplicate that on the new one.

    Once the saddle height and fore aft position are set, I then use the sizing stem to choose a comfortable bar position. I started out with as much as 9 cm drop from the saddle to the bar back in the day when I was racing a lot. My latest set up is with the bar and saddle at about the same height. My bar position has gotten closer to the saddle over the years as well. My arms are long for my height, so you might want the bar even higher than level with the saddle.

    I think if you start with the saddle height and fore-aft adjustments first, the rest of the fit will fall into place more easily.

    Your wheelbase will certainly be longer with your Epiphany and the ability to manual the bike with just a weight shift will be less. Overall, once you've adjusted I'm sure you will prefer your new bike, though. I'll wager it will be faster, safer and more comfortable over most terrain.

    (Edit: I'm referring to the height from the center of the crank spindle to the top of the seat)
    Last edited by Bob the Wheelbuilder; 01-08-2006 at 06:41 PM.
    {Principal Skinner} Hmm. Whoever did this is in very deep trouble.
    {Martin} And a sloppy speller too. The preferred spelling of 'wiener' is w - i - e - n - e - r, although 'e - i' is an acceptable ethnic variant.

  18. #18
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    No worries OSOKOLO, the badge was found on the trail - it was unused (still had the unpleeled adhesive sticker on the back).
    Hydrate or Die Trying

  19. #19
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    Bike adjustments

    Quote Originally Posted by merdas
    Here are some pictures:
    Hi, I've changed frames 3 times this year. (Stumpjumper 4", Truth 4", Epi 5"). I've found that each frame has a different setup for my body & riding style. The Stumpjumper was a Large, the Truth an 18" and now the Epi a 17". I'm 5'11 210#...

    Anyways, you have a LOT to play with:
    handle bars, stem, stem height, seat height, seat setback, seat height, Shoe clip position, etc.
    I agree that the 19" is the right size for you... I also agree with other's comments that 'old' style xc bikes were more like roadbikes than the new generation.

    Thease are my recommendations (careful I do not claim to be an expert by any means).

    Seat height should achieve %100 - 107 of inseam length together with riding shoes for mostly XC setup. If you get more aggresive I would go down to %90-%100. I have a 34" inseam (with shoes) I use a Gravity dropper that I setup @34.5" for XC pedaling, @33.5" for technical pedaling and @31" for downhills...

    I like to have the shoe clips a little behind the ball of the foot (better on the tendons, anckle..)
    For your size (I assume you have wide shoulders) I think you need wider handlebars. Recommend getting the slanted handlebars.
    The stem height seems high if you have long arms, try a quick ride around the block with no spacers at the bottom of the stem and see how it feels.
    Be careful with too much setback on the seat, your center of gravity while pedaling will not be what the design eng. had in mind...

    Don't despair, with some tweeking and riding time you'll love your new setup...

    Now setting the right fork/rear suspension pressure/compression/rebound is another story!
    Here you should start with text-book sag setup together with every other tweek @middle. Start playing with the setups and you'll find what works for you. I personnally end up with more sag (lower) pressure than recommended, also with slower rebound... I do change compression depending on the trail...

    Have fun....

    ___________o
    ------- _`\<,_ ~~ It is better to have done ~~
    ------ (*)/ (*) ~~ too much than not enough. ~~
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  20. #20
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    I didn't notice the FLAT bars in your pics! You have got to try out riser bars - you'll love them!
    Hydrate or Die Trying

  21. #21
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    Thank you all, I will experiment a bit and get back to you with the resoults (chicago weather permitting). Again, thanks a lot for your input.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by merdas
    Thank you all, I will experiment a bit and get back to you with the resoults (chicago weather permitting). Again, thanks a lot for your input.

    How do you rate the spinergys?

  23. #23
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    Stem Size on Epiphany

    Hi Pain

    Still showing off your sexy bike I see

    Just wondering how long your stem is. I have ordered a 100mm stem for my 19" Epi (I'm 6ft3").
    Just reading this thread and wondering whether 100mm is too little. I have a 100mm on my Specialized Stumpy HT (2004 model).

    Cheers

  24. #24
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    Hi Greg,

    This great bike, and all I have are these crummy static shots around the house! I hope to soon get some worthy action shots.

    As for the stem, i'm running the 110mm w/10 or 6 degress rise (what ever rise the Thomson elite X4 has) and the first day I rode it I wanted to trade it out for a 120, but my buddies convinced me to give it another ride or two, so I did and am more happy for it. You'll have to just wait to see how it feels when you get it, but I think that you are starting with the smartest option, the 100mm, I think, would make the bike even more fun than my 110 - but I'm maxed out as it is so have fun and experiment, thats part of the fun of getting a new bike (whats an extra $80 for an additional stem when your already spending 5-6 grand? )
    Hydrate or Die Trying

  25. #25
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    Re: Bike Setup

    Clarification... I measure seat height from the pedal (at the farthest from the seat) to the seat top....

    ___________o
    ------- _`\<,_ ~~ It is better to have done ~~
    ------ (*)/ (*) ~~ too much than not enough. ~~
    **********************************************

  26. #26
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    Spec Chat

    Thanks for the feedback Pain

    As I might have mentioned, I'm getting mine, all custom parts & built FREE as I won it in a competition. I am currently using a Thomson setback seatpost and Thomson stem on my Stumpy HT. My handlebars = Easton CF Monkey Lite Low Rise . I would have to say that IMO you can't get a better setup in front or a better Seatpost.

    Unfortunately the local distributor (who are sponsoring the parts & the reason I cant get the silly grin off my face) does not stock Thomson or Easton products. This is my spec based on the parts available and taking my 6ft3" 98Kg (216pound) body into consideration:-

    FRAME ELLSWORTH Epiphany 19” Black Anodized
    REAR SHOCK Fox Float RP3
    FORK Fox Float RLC130mm
    HEADSET Syncros Factory XC
    STEM Syncros Hinged Stem
    HANDLEBAR Syncros Carbon Gain bar
    GRIPS ODI lock on Red
    BRAKES Hayes El Camino
    BRAKE CABLES Hayes El Camino
    BRAKE HOSES Goodridge
    CALIPERS Hayes El Camino
    ROTORS Hayes El Camino
    ADAPTORS Hayes
    SADDLE SDG Belair RL Zebra
    SEAT POST Syncros Micro Adjust
    CRANKSCrank Brothers Cobalt
    BOTTOM BRACKET SKF 600 series
    CHAINRINGS Truvativ
    PEDALS Candy SL Black
    WHEELS:
    RIMS DT Swiss EX 5.1d
    HUB FRONT Hadley XC Red
    HUB REAR Hadley XC Red
    SPOKES DT Swiss Competition Black
    NIPPLES DT Swiss Pro-Lock Brass Black
    TYRES Syncros PNC factory 2.35”.
    SHIFTERS SRAM X-9
    FRONT DERAILLEUR SRAM X-9
    REAR DERAILLEUR SRAM X-9

    I am considering swapping over my Thomson Stem and Easton handlebars from my HT or I might just buy these on Ebay & keep my HT in the excellent state she's in .I am also currently bidding on a Thomson setback seatpost 27.2mm x 440mm (different seatpost diameter to my HT which is 30.9mm). Am I bidding for the right size ? I think I did check it right on the Ellsworth website ?

    Anyway seeing all these beautiful machines in this thread is making me drool!! This must be why they call it Bike Porn! Looks like I'll be waiting until March to get my Dream machine but It was my choice to wait for a 2006 Epi instead of going with a Moment. I have had countless sleepless nights wondering whether or not I am making the right choice but the Epi looks awesome and yes I'll be posting Pics when she arrives and then some!!!!
    Last edited by greg.ag; 01-10-2006 at 04:21 AM.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by greg.ag
    Thanks for the feedback Pain

    As I might have mentioned, I'm getting mine, all custom parts & built FREE as I won it in a competition. I am currently using a Thomson setback seatpost and Thomson stem on my Stumpy HT. My handlebars = Easton CF Monkey Lite Low Rise . I would have to say that IMO you can't get a better setup in front or a better Seatpost.

    Unfortunately the local distributor (who are sponsoring the parts & the reason I cant get the silly grin off my face) does not stock Thomson or Easton products. This is my spec based on the parts available and taking my 6ft3" 98Kg (216pound) body into consideration:-

    FRAME ELLSWORTH Epiphany 19” Black Anodized
    REAR SHOCK Fox Float RP3
    FORK Fox Float RLC130mm
    HEADSET Syncros Factory XC
    STEM Syncros Hinged Stem
    HANDLEBAR Syncros Carbon Gain bar
    GRIPS ODI lock on Red
    BRAKES Hayes El Camino
    BRAKE CABLES Hayes El Camino
    BRAKE HOSES Goodridge
    CALIPERS Hayes El Camino
    ROTORS Hayes El Camino
    ADAPTORS Hayes
    SADDLE SDG Belair RL Zebra
    SEAT POST Syncros Micro Adjust
    CRANKSCrank Brothers Cobalt
    BOTTOM BRACKET SKF 600 series
    CHAINRINGS Truvativ
    PEDALS Candy SL Black
    WHEELS:
    RIMS DT Swiss EX 5.1d
    HUB FRONT Hadley XC Red
    HUB REAR Hadley XC Red
    SPOKES DT Swiss Competition Black
    NIPPLES DT Swiss Pro-Lock Brass Black
    TYRES Syncros PNC factory 2.35”.
    SHIFTERS SRAM X-9
    FRONT DERAILLEUR SRAM X-9
    REAR DERAILLEUR SRAM X-9

    I am considering swapping over my Thomson Stem and Easton handlebars from my HT or I might just buy these on Ebay & keep my HT in the excellent state she's in .I am also currently bidding on a Thomson setback seatpost 27.2mm x 440mm (different seatpost diameter to my HT which is 30.9mm). Am I bidding for the right size ? I think I did check it right on the Ellsworth website ?

    Anyway seeing all these beautiful machines in this thread is making me drool!! This must be why they call it Bike Porn! Looks like I'll be waiting until March to get my Dream machine but It was my choice to wait for a 2006 Epi instead of going with a Moment. I have had countless sleepless nights wondering whether or not I am making the right choice but the Epi looks awesome and yes I'll be posting Pics when she arrives and then some!!!!
    Yeah, you've got the right diameter seat post in mind, though I'm not sure you'll need the full 440mm...I did, but I'm on medium.

    If you haven't tried out the el caminos, i'd reconsider the juicy carbons with galfer rotors, and after 5 rides of bedding in, they ROCK! If you do know that you like the El Caminos, then great - I didn't preffer their lack of adjustability (in pad contact). I went 160/185 with the brakes.

    Another consideration is the RS Revelation, it is soo balanced with the EPI.

    Be extra glad that you didn't got with the Moment B/C they will be releasing their '06 Moment later this year and you would be so bummed that you had gone with the the '05 - they really made the '06 Moment a work of art (very similar to the EPI).

    Man, my wife sure would have preffered that I got my Epi for free too!

    You'll love it. I can't wait to hear how you like the Hadleys...I'm starting to question the legitimacy of all the drag on my rear king hub (I just don't get it).
    Hydrate or Die Trying

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAINpusher
    You'll love it. I can't wait to hear how you like the Hadleys...I'm starting to question the legitimacy of all the drag on my rear king hub (I just don't get it).
    The Kings get better in time...and the Hadleys are really loud. ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ....

  29. #29
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    DAM IT!! I like loud.

    Hmm, I will have to research if I can build my second wheel set with Hadleys without worrying too much about tolerance issues when switching out the two rear wheels.
    Hydrate or Die Trying

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAINpusher
    DAM IT!! I like loud.

    Hmm, I will have to research if I can build my second wheel set with Hadleys without worrying too much about tolerance issues when switching out the two rear wheels.
    Spacing should be the same. It's based on the frame's design. Just get the same rotors and they should be okay.

  31. #31
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    Hi again, I have a quick question.
    I see that everybody is using the rised handlebars. Isn't the flat bar with more spacers the same or there is something else to consider?

  32. #32
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    Reputation: PAINpusher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by merdas
    Hi again, I have a quick question.
    I see that everybody is using the rised handlebars. Isn't the flat bar with more spacers the same or there is something else to consider?
    Riser bars are the funnest upgrade i've ever made to my mt. bikes. They are very different from flat bars in a few ways:

    -they are wider,
    -they have an upward bend (curving up on each end)
    -they have sweep (bent back towards you)
    -they have more flex (due to their width)

    What does all this do for you? This will give you more comfort in the arms (much more ergonomically shaped), this will exponentially increase your confidence through the technical sections, and you will have a better sense of balance at slower (and faster) speeds. And most importantly, it will keep everyone from laughing at you for having a flat bar on a 5" tail bike

    Note: When I suggested stem lengths for you earlier, I didn't realize at that time you were running a flat bar - these stem lengths are for use with a riser bar.

    You will want to start out by looking at riser bars like:
    -Easton monkey light carbon lo rise 31.8 (oversized)
    -FSA Carbon 31.8
    -MAXM carbon

    And there are many many more. Do yourself a favor and be sure to go with the new oversized stems and bars (31.8mm). They offer a lot of strength for their weight...and they look cool.
    Hydrate or Die Trying

  33. #33
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    Do you think it is worth it to me to change these 2, and if yes what size of a stem and handle bar should I apgrade to?
    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by PAINpusher
    Riser bars are the funnest upgrade i've ever made to my mt. bikes. They are very different from flat bars in a few ways:

    -they are wider,
    -they have an upward bend (curving up on each end)
    -they have sweep (bent back towards you)
    -they have more flex (due to their width)

    What does all this do for you? This will give you more comfort in the arms (much more ergonomically shaped), this will exponentially increase your confidence through the technical sections, and you will have a better sense of balance at slower (and faster) speeds. And most importantly, it will keep everyone from laughing at you for having a flat bar on a 5" tail bike

    Note: When I suggested stem lengths for you earlier, I didn't realize at that time you were running a flat bar - these stem lengths are for use with a riser bar.

    You will want to start out by looking at riser bars like:
    -Easton monkey light carbon lo rise 31.8 (oversized)
    -FSA Carbon 31.8
    -MAXM carbon

    And there are many many more. Do yourself a favor and be sure to go with the new oversized stems and bars (31.8mm). They offer a lot of strength for their weight...and they look cool.

  34. #34
    Are you talking to me?
    Reputation: damion's Avatar
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    Jun 2003
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    3,883

    Stop, already.

    Do NOT go and buy a bar and stem without getting your fit sorted out first! I do agree with others about the use of a MonkeyLite OS bar. However, you really need to take your bike to a good shop and get it fit for you. It is worth a few $ to get this right.

    Bob has given very sound fit advice. If it is too hard to follow, get some professional fit help. A fittech will have a box of stems to work with. THis will allow you to get closer to your ideal fit. You will be very happy with your setup from then on.

    Good luck.
    gfy

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