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  1. #1
    Alright, let's ride!
    Reputation: LowCel's Avatar
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    Enlightenment, after the face lift.

    I have been working for a while trying to get the weight down on my Ellsworth Enlightenment. After countless hours of research, time waiting for parts, and spending enough money to make the national debt look like chump change it is just about done. I am still waiting for my Boone ti rings and I may order some aluminum and titanium bolts, but other than that I think I'm done spending money on it for a while. I am also going to be cutting the steerer tube off some more once I figure out exactly how low I want to run the stem. I still need to cut the seatpost down as well.

    Here are the changes that I have made so far:

    FSA XC-115 stem replaced a Thomson Elite stem.
    Fizik Gobi saddle replaced a Fizik Aliante saddle.
    SRAM X.0 rear dreailleur replaced a SRAM X.9 rear deralleur.
    Eggbeaters Ti spindle replaced Eggbeater chrome spindle.
    Shimano Ultegra 12 - 27 cassette replaced XT 11 - 34 cassette.
    American Classic MTB 350 disc wheels replaced Hugi 240 / Mavic 317 disc rims.
    Kenda Karma DTC tires replaced Continental Escape and Explorer tires.
    American Classic skewers replaced Shimano XT skewers.

    I think that is about all of the changes I've made recently. The new weight is right at 20.75 pounds. My goal is to have it down to 20.5 pounds. I think I'll be able to do it without having to file bankruptcy.

    Anyway, what ya think?





  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    You could get it under 20 if you dump the saddle and seatpost :P

    Grant

  3. #3
    Alright, let's ride!
    Reputation: LowCel's Avatar
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    After having prostatitis twice I'm not willing to give up a saddle that works for me.

  4. #4
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    Reputation: Futurepath's Avatar
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    Too dang heavy...

    Haha. Just kidding. You ought to blast past the competition from the training and that "air" light bike Looks great!

  5. #5
    "Its All Good"
    Reputation: Whafe's Avatar
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    LowCel, it is looking spanking!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Great looking scooter
    The_Lecht_Rocks: whafe - cheeers - may i offer an official apology for the wagon wheeler "dis-belief"

  6. #6
    Alright, let's ride!
    Reputation: LowCel's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone!

  7. #7
    Trail rider and racer
    Reputation: Trevor!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LowCel
    After having prostatitis twice I'm not willing to give up a saddle that works for me.
    Whilst postatitis is from infection I still would stick with a more comfortable or padded saddle.

    And I think your build is spot on perfect. Keep the post too. I had a nice light EC70 but that thing sucks in comparision to my Thompson so happen to agree, there really isn't anything much more reliable than the Thompson!
    Trev!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by LowCel
    After having prostatitis twice I'm not willing to give up a saddle that works for me.
    Sorry... maybe I should have added /tic. I meant no seat and seatpost trials style

    Grant

  9. #9
    Alright, let's ride!
    Reputation: LowCel's Avatar
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    Well I finally had an opportunity to take the bike out tonight. This was it's first ride since I did all of the upgrades. It was a relatively easy night ride, stayed primarily in heart rate zones 1 - 3 so I wasn't exactly riding at race pace. I could still tell the bike is fast. I was a little worried about the ride since I went ahead and put on the 12 - 27 cassette even though I haven't received my new 20t and 31t chainrings. I debated putting the 11 - 34 back on for this ride but decided against it. Once I started climbing my mind was put at ease. Losing all of the rotating weight really made a difference, I never even noticed the smaller cassette.

    I hate to say it, but the bike actually felt like it was moving without me. It almost felt like I was riding on flat ground even when I was climbing. On a climb that I normally climb in 32x30 or 32x34 I was climbing with no problems in my 32 x 27 gear.

    The wheelset was great, I have no idea how American Classic could make a wheelset that is so light so stiff. The first couple of roots I jumped left me with a stunned look on my face. It almost hurt when I landed the bike. I quickly remembered that I was on my hardtail and not my full suspension. After a few minutes I learned how to ride again and everything was fine. The ride is rather harsh but I expected that. You don't ride an aluminum hardtail with a stiff wheelset and expect it to feel like you are riding a lazy boy.

    The tires were great as well. They provided great traction on the roots and rocks. They saved me a couple of times on the damp leaves as well.

    The SRAM X.0 derailleur shifted just like it is supposed to, and always has....perfect! The Ultegra 12 - 27 cassette did it's job as well. The FSA XC-115 stem and the ti eggbeater spindles did their job as well. They helped lighten up the bike but more importantly I never noticed them. I think that is the best that you can hope for when changing parts like this. After all, the parts they replaced performed flawlessly, these do the same just a little lighter.

    I have no doubt that doing the recent changes will make me at least thirty seconds quicker on a ten minute climb.

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