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  1. #1
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    Anyone build up a lightish 7" Joker?

    I'm thinking of building up a light XC/All Mountain 7" Joker and was wondering if anyone else had done the same...

    How does it perform in this mode as opposed to free ride?

    How light can you get it without getting stupid? (was thinking of using a 5" Fox Vanilla up front)

    Also, I'm 6'4"...will the large be big enough for me if I use a longish (120mm) stem?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Chipper
    I'm thinking of building up a light XC/All Mountain 7" Joker and was wondering if anyone else had done the same...

    How does it perform in this mode as opposed to free ride?

    How light can you get it without getting stupid? (was thinking of using a 5" Fox Vanilla up front)

    Also, I'm 6'4"...will the large be big enough for me if I use a longish (120mm) stem?

    Thanks!
    I used to ride a 7" Joker and it weighed around 38 to 39lbs with a pretty burly parts spec. The frame is fairly light and I have seen Jokers built around 35lbs and under. I had a 6" Sherman breakout on mine and would ride it in 5" mode for the hills and epics. You will want a 6" fork for sure to compliment the 7" back end. It is that much more fun on the dh.

    The Joker makes for a decent trail bike, but keep in mind that it has a 67dg head angle which makes it fairly slack. I liked the Joker as a do everything bike and the head angle did not bother me that much. It just made the bike easier to flip around when going downhill. I rode a medium at 5'10", so at 6'4" the large might be a tad small for you. I would suggest test riding one first if it is possible.

  3. #3
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    You can build it big but light

    I ride a Joker 7" and have it built up like a strong Freeride or DH bike and it still only weighs in at just over 34lbs. Sherman Slider+ up front, Truvative Holzfeller Triple, XTR Front D, XO Shorty Twist, Rear D and Cassette, Thomson Stem and Seatpost, Oversized Carbon Bars, etc. Its definately light enough to pedal anywhere, but is still awesome on the downhills and drops. You have plenty of options to build light, go to it.

    P

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    I rode a medium at 5'10", so at 6'4" the large might be a tad small for you. I would suggest test riding one first if it is possible.
    I have a long reach, but rather short inseam for my height (34"). If I outfit the bike with a 120mm stem, I believe I should have just about the perfect reach, since it's already a fairly long top tube (24.25"). Any tall guys out there on a Joker?

    I'm getting ready to finalize a deal tomorrow on a complete bike based on the 19" Joker. When it's done, it should weigh somewhere between 30-31 pounds. I do mostly XC with a mix of technical...lots of whoops, a few jumps, and a bunch of rocks and logs, nothing major. I figure with the Atlas rear and a 34 tooth rear cog, I should be able to climb just about anything seated.

  5. #5
    Jii
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    As said before, the Joker can quite easily be built up pretty light. Mine is at about 37 lbs right now, but i prefer burly stuff.

    I'm 6'1" and the medium is perfect for me. My inseam is 34". I think the large would be ok for you. Mind you though, the sizing is perfect for my FR/aggro trailriding style, so if you do 100% XC it MIGHT be a tad too small. Doubt it, but it's possible.

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