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  1. #1
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    Opinion: Bring or Rent?

    Just curious what people think about traveling and bringing/renting bikes.

    I'm booked to head to Whistler in mid August for a 100% riding trip. I'm there for 7 days and intend to spend 5 days XC riding and 1-2 days in the park.

    I'm pretty much split on renting versus bringing one of my MTB's (Jamis Dragon Pro or Yeti ASR). This is obviously only for when I ride XC, park I will be renting regardless.

    Pro's to bringing a bike:
    - They are mine and set up in a familiar manner (notable if I'm doing real epics)
    - They are higher quality than what I am going to rent
    - Somewhat cheaper (I figure the airlines and shuttle will ding me about $150 in extra fees). Bike rental appears to be about $250 for 5-6 days (for a long travel, SLX equipped trail bike)

    Pro's for renting
    - Bike boxes. I've only traveled once with a bike box. Wasting time in an airport with one is horrible!
    - I currently have 6 bikes that I ride on a regular basis, 5 routinely on longer rides. They all fit differently, so I'm not really afraid of dealing with fit issues (unless I end up with some truly epic rides).
    - Bike storage. While the condo I'm staying at has 'secure' bike storage, I'm unsure what that really means. Secure means different things to different people, especially when I'm talking about my Yeti. Rental, whatever.
    - Rentals can be ridden like they are stolen.
    - Build up and tear down of bike. Taking away from quality beer time.

    I'm leaning towards the rental, the money isn't really significant and the convenience factor seems worth it. Where I am really struggling is being used to higher end bikes that I keep in good shape. I plan to put some serious riding time in and don't want the bike to get in the way of that.

    Opinions, experiences, horror stories?

  2. #2
    Evil Jr.
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    For me, it's come down to racing vs. touring.

    If I'm racing (TransRockies, BCBR, etc...), my bike comes with me and it can be a big hassle (getting to and from airports, rebuilding a bike in a parking garage...).

    For touring (Vancouver, San Francisco, etc...), I've rented relatively low-end bikes and had no problems.

    Anything at the SLX level will probably ride pretty well. I'd say go with that.
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  3. #3
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    Depends on the type of bike one has and how creative you are.

    - If it's a dually then learn to take apart the rear swing arm. Can get it down smaller.

    - Some people have been taking the time to either find or fabricate their own wheel carriers.

    In the end it's all about breaking it down into 2 smaller size pieces. For some twisted reason they make it an exercise to haul a bike box. Yet when my brother travelled ski racing with 6 pairs of skiis and all that clap trap... no issue.

  4. #4
    Evil Jr.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enduramil
    In the end it's all about breaking it down into 2 smaller size pieces. For some twisted reason they make it an exercise to haul a bike box. Yet when my brother travelled ski racing with 6 pairs of skiis and all that clap trap... no issue.
    It all depends.

    AC is $50 even if they just THINK it's a bike. My folder gets down way smaller than a golf bag and they still charge extra for it. I think Delta jacks it to $100 (and they charge $25 PER checked bag on top of that).

    Westjet lets skis fly for free. I love Westjet.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster
    It all depends.

    AC is $50 even if they just THINK it's a bike. My folder gets down way smaller than a golf bag and they still charge extra for it. I think Delta jacks it to $100 (and they charge $25 PER checked bag on top of that).

    Westjet lets skis fly for free. I love Westjet.
    Frak Air Canada. Westjet.. never charged.

    Though am now working on a wheel case for travel.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=425479

  6. #6
    dwt
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    Pack your bike box with bike, tools, helmet, shoes, lube, camelbak, and any other stuff that's a PIA to pack in your suitcase or to get on a plane.

    Take the box to the UPS store where you live; ship it to the UPS Store at your destination.

    When you're done, do it all in reverse.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  7. #7
    Evil Jr.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt
    Pack your bike box with bike, tools, helmet, shoes, lube, camelbak, and any other stuff that's a PIA to pack in your suitcase or to get on a plane.

    Take the box to the UPS store where you live; ship it to the UPS Store at your destination.

    When you're done, do it all in reverse.
    When we did TransRockies, one of my team mates had a brilliant idea. He sent his bike to Invermere via Greyhound. No fuss, no muss and dirt-cheap.

    What we learned later was that packages travel at the lowest priority. In other words, if there's too much luggage, the package stays behind until the next available bus. And so on.

    Here we were near midnight the day before the race, praying that this bike would show up on the last bus before the start. Thankfully it did but it did make me a little squeamish about sending bikes on ahead.

    UPS might work though. Not sure what rate you'd get. Sometimes I send documents to Chicago overnight and just that will run $60.
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  8. #8
    bi-winning
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    This summer I'm renting a bike. The trip is not 100% riding. I'm not concerned about riding a Deore level bike. Bringing my own bike seemed like it would be a hastle. Watch for a trip report coming in June.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  9. #9
    sock puppet
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    bring...
    it may be just me, but i can not have as much fun on the bike i don't "know". it may be the best bike out there, but by the time i "learn" it - it is just not as much fun.

    an hour to box it and unbox it can be made up elsewhere - like going out to pick up a rental and returning it etc. so no excuses regarding beer time. besides, beer time is any time.

  10. #10
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    Rent.

    Not sure where all you have looked at renting but shops like Evolution rent Special Ed Enduro and Stumpy's.

    http://www.evolutionwhistler.com/page/bike-rentals/

    Fanatyk Co has Norco Range, or Shinobi 29er. They also have Knolly DH bikes, call ahead they may have a Knolly Trail bike kicking around.

    http://www.fanatykco.com/itoolkit.as...LS_09B2P515903

    Bike Co has the Devinci Dixon.

    http://bikeco.ca/rental/

    One of these three shops is going to put you on much better maintained bike for both DH and XC than WBP rental bikes.

    Depending on what xc stuff you plan to ride you will likely find yourself abusing the bike. Might as well abuse a nice rental vs busting up your own bike. The valley trails are BC xc, elsewhere this would be AM or light FR. Depending on what you are used to riding on what bikes you might want something a little more slack than the Yeti with a longer fork.

  11. #11
    Space for rent...
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    I did a trip to South America and went through the same exercise. I ended up renting. The cost and hassle of lugging everything around just didn't seem to be worth the effort.

    If you have a high end bike and performance is very important to you, normally, you would only be happy riding what you are used to, or perhaps riding an upgraded rig. However, I am guessing the this XC riding experience will be less reliant on what you are riding, as opposed to where you are riding.

    Pictures....we want lots of picture.
    It's only pain......

  12. #12
    Lemmy Rules!
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    Sounds to me like this will be the biking trip of a lifetime.

    If I were going to do the biking trip of a lifetime, like Oksolo, I would want to do it on my own bike.
    Strava made me do it....

  13. #13
    bi-winning
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSteve F
    Pictures....we want lots of pictures.
    Yes.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued
    Sounds to me like this will be the biking trip of a lifetime.

    If I were going to do the biking trip of a lifetime, like Oksolo, I would want to do it on the right bike for the trails.
    I fixed your post.

    The right bike is more important than your own bike.

    I am going to Peru next summer for a DH trip, I won't be taking my hardtail or my all-mountian bike, I'll be building up a specific bike just for the trip. The right bike.

  15. #15
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    This is a 100% bike trip so I would definitely bring your bike. It takes half an hour to set up your bike. And you can drink beer while doing it You will be most comfortable on the bike if it's your own and especially riding in BC you will ride more confidently on your own ride.

    Westjet and Air Canada charges $50. Don't fly any US airlines, they will totally rip you off, ie. $100 plus for a bike box. I've heard people using hockey bags and not being charged a thing.

  16. #16
    No. Just No.
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    Just to be different...

    I've flown with bike(s) packed in proper bike boxes many times between ON and BC.

    On the other hand, I've also done it several times with the barebones approach i.e. just like the instructions say remove pedals, turn bars sideways, partially deflate tires. I went a bit further and unbolted the rear hanger from the frame then wrapped the derailleur bundle in a couple of bags and taped to seatstay to keep it from rattling around, plus put a layer of padded wrap around the fork stanchions. Bike goes into jumbo plastic bag provided by carrier. Never had a problem with this method and yes, these were the usual mega dollar race bikes. Bike is ready to ride with just a couple of minutes of mech work, no re-adjusting after assembly, no huge bike box to deal with for the rest of the trip.

    Having done both ways many times, I must admit I often feel more nervous using the hardshell case, worried that someone will take this as a license to abuse it and pile craploads of stuff on top of it, which is not a good thing with most clamshell cases as things will still get crushed inside.

    I almost always use Westjet as my domestic carrier. Probably woudn't go barebones if it was anything but domestic, one plane (i.e. no baggage transfers).

    YMMV x1 billion. I take no responsibility if you draw the short straw using this method.

  17. #17
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    Ya'll have me even more confused that ever.

    I'd prefer to ride one of my own bikes. And I'm not worried about being able to handle the terrain with them, but a slacker 5x5 bike would likely be better suited to the trails.

    Maybe I should buy a new bike. I've been wanting an FS 5x5 trail bike.

    I'm also however seduced by the idea of traveling easier and not worry about a bike. Though circlip I've heard other people say just twist the handle bars and bring it in is nice and easy.

    I need to email the place I'm staying. Anyone have first hand experience what a 'secure' bike storage means?

    Does it just a mean a room that anyone at the hotel has access to. Or does someone actually check to see who checked in the bike and they must check it out?

    I assume I won't be able to bring my bike to the room with secure storage

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by shirk
    Rent.

    One of these three shops is going to put you on much better maintained bike for both DH and XC than WBP rental bikes.
    Just to repeat.

    If one went now they could get away with one of the rentals. But in August... they will be as loose and battered as the Uni tramp on graduation.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louda
    This is a 100% bike trip so I would definitely bring your bike. It takes half an hour to set up your bike. And you can drink beer while doing it You will be most comfortable on the bike if it's your own and especially riding in BC you will ride more confidently on your own ride.

    Westjet and Air Canada charges $50. Don't fly any US airlines, they will totally rip you off, ie. $100 plus for a bike box. I've heard people using hockey bags and not being charged a thing.
    I believe one air carrier has stated they would lower the fees for bikes in they fit within certain dimensions and I think went as two pieces.

    Easily solved by the wheel box and whatever one comes up with for the frame... many ideas there.

  20. #20
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    Tip,

    - for 26inch wheels a 24 or 25 inch bass drum case can hold the wheels. This was actually in Dirt Rag a few years ago.

    - Keep in mind that the trail grading in Whistler/BC is harder in Ontario. What Ontario calls a black diamond is closer to a blue square trail in BC. As Shirk hinted at,

    What Ontario calls DH/Freeride is what in BC is XC.

  21. #21
    No. Just No.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor
    Maybe I should buy a new bike. I've been wanting an FS 5x5 trail bike.
    If you were on the clock then the quickest way around almost any up 'n' down (except the truly gnarly stuff) is almost always going to be the XC rig, making time on the climbs and then just hold on to your balls on the descent. However, if the goal was to enjoy the riding and have fun i.e. not racing, then a 5+5 or even light 6+6 would be a no-brainer for the "xc" riding around Whistler.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor
    I need to email the place I'm staying. Anyone have first hand experience what a 'secure' bike storage means?

    Does it just a mean a room that anyone at the hotel has access to. Or does someone actually check to see who checked in the bike and they must check it out?

    I assume I won't be able to bring my bike to the room with secure storage
    Bull Shiet. There is no such thing as "secure" bike storage in Whistler. I think it was last year that a hotel had it's "secure" bike room raided by theives. Get up to your room.

    Whistler is bike theft central. Do not repeat Do Not leave your bike unattended anywhere in Whistler Village.

  23. #23
    No. Just No.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enduramil
    I believe one air carrier has stated they would lower the fees for bikes in they fit within certain dimensions and I think went as two pieces.

    Easily solved by the wheel box and whatever one comes up with for the frame... many ideas there.
    I've also broken down FS bikes before and packed into suitcases. One suitcase for the frame with front and rear tri separated and another suitcase for the wheels. Needs to be really, really specific suitcases to make this work though and be within 62" LxWxH limits to avoid oversize charges.

    The whole process was a PITA though. Once I got down to business, it was surprising how much stuff had to be disassembled, then re-adjusted with this method. I don't plan on doing it again anytime soon.

  24. #24
    namagomi
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enduramil
    Bull Shiet. There is no such thing as "secure" bike storage in Whistler. I think it was last year that a hotel had it's "secure" bike room raided by theives. Get up to your room.

    Whistler is bike theft central. Do not repeat Do Not leave your bike unattended anywhere in Whistler Village.
    Yup.

    Does the city have bixi in Vancouver? Just rent one of those... it will almost be like having an expensive rigid single-speed. I'm not sure how a roller-brake would work out for you on A-line.

    I'd bring my own bicycle, but never leave it unattended or in my rental. Shipping to a friends house with a cheap ground-service might be cheaper than taking it on the flight.

  25. #25
    I Wanna Be Sedated
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    We're heading to Whistler in just under two weeks for a few days of riding. Since this is smack between the Hardwood Canada Cup and the Albion O-Cup, we've decided to rent some Stumpjumpers. Report to follow. Maybe.
    Jouko

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Circlip
    The whole process was a PITA though. Once I got down to business, it was surprising how much stuff had to be disassembled, then re-adjusted with this method. I don't plan on doing it again anytime soon.
    Translation... do not attempt this if one is anal retentive and a ham fist with tools.

  27. #27
    Lemmy Rules!
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    Here's some thinking out of the box (no pun intended)

    If you've been looking for a new 5" squishy bike, buy one out there and ship it home via UPS when you are done.

    You can research the bike you want here, then call a dealer out there to have one ready for you. Negotiate in the cost of packing the bike up to ship it home.
    Strava made me do it....

  28. #28
    Perpetual Hack
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enduramil
    Just to repeat.

    If one went now they could get away with one of the rentals. But in August... they will be as loose and battered as the Uni tramp on graduation.
    From what I understand, this is pretty much correct, except for the Knolly's. They do not blow them out at year end, but run them for several years.
    The Knolly's bearings are top of the line (INA) and usually last several years in the BC shore environment. I would have no issues renting a Podium in late August.

    But them I am biased as I have been riding Knolly's for 4 plus years and have never had any issue with a bearing, bearing seat, axle, linkage or anything.

    of course your mileage may vary.

    michael

  29. #29
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    Every summer I do 1 or 2 major out of province bike trips with a bunch of guys coming from all over the continent. I have always brought my own bike, and always in a cardboard bike box. Some of the other guys have rented. I ride a small bike, so size availability in rentals isn't always great everywhere. I also am familiar with my bike and it has been well suited to the riding - sometimes it is a little heavy and slow for the more XC rides, but it has served me well at the bike parks too and I never regretted the bike I was riding. Sometimes I bring DH tires with me. I have never had the guts to send the bike unpackaged, and I usually need the box space for helmet, armour, shoes, etc. I prefer the cardboard box to the dedicated reusable bike box/bag because sometimes we have travelled by car and could not fit all the boxes. For example, fly into Calgary, discard boxes and roadtrip to Vancouver. Source box in Van and fly home. If you are doing this, try to source a box in advance because I got stuck with a small roadie box on a long weekend once... Not pretty! Some of our group have run into issues with rentals, such as broken parts, not great maintenance (cables/shifting/derailleur hangers etc), sizing, etc. Less of an issue usually if the shop is good, and we've never had an issue that left anyone stranded, but we've definitely had more issues with rentals than personal bikes. In one case it cost us an afternoon of screwing around waiting for repairs instead of riding. Another consideration is the flexibility of pick-up and drop-off - again, more an issue with the point-to-point roadtrips, but still, if the bike shop doesn't open til 10, you're not on the road/trail til 11... If they close at 6, or aren't open Sunday...
    Storage/theft: We've never stayed anywhere that wasn't either someone's house where we could bring bikes inside, or a rental house where there was a garage. There are definitely some advantages to renting, and I would consider it under the right circumstances. I would never compromise and ride the wrong bike (be it mine or rental), and don't discount the benefit of familiarity. Anyway, those are my random comments, hopefully some of that is helpful.

  30. #30
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    I'm heading out to WBP at the end of June for a week followed by a week in Cumberland. For me a rental is not in the cards. I have a 6 inch AM bike that does it all, and I even rode it DH at WBP many years ago. Sure I won't be the fastest guy around, but I'd rather have the flexibility of not having to ride lift assist all the time.

    I'm packing my bike up in a standard cardboard bike box this time, a few friends have used this method with zero issues. I used a hard case last time and it was a pita to drag around in the van between locations (Kamloops, Shore, Williams Lake, etc). At least the bike box collapses and if need be, we can source another one for the way home. We're booked at a condo in Whistler and the bikes will be in the room with us, using the storage locker is crazy talk.

    The way my bike is set up now, if I run the fork at 6 inches, my HA is around 67.5 degrees which is fine for steeper terrain, I may bring a spare stem that is shorter too. In 5 inch mode it is uber sweet for simple trail riding so I'll be adjusting depending on the trail needs. I've ridden this bike for the past 9 seasons and I can't imagine leaving it at home to ride some of the best terrain in the world. I'm also fine with replacing anything that breaks on it, I'd still rather have my own bike and risk parts then use a rental that I am not familiar with. The trails we'll be on with be very technical and familiarity with my bike is a huge part of successfully navigating tricky sections and feeling confident to hit drops, stunts, jumps, etc.

    Have fun!

  31. #31
    Evil Jr.
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    Since I know both your bikes are 26ers, this doesn't really apply to you but it might be useful to anyone else lurking with a 29er. Most medium 29ers don't easily fit into "normal" cases or boxes and I've had to do a fair amount of dis-assembly to get everything to fit to my liking (including bubble wrap).

    Skewers and rotors come off and go into a separate padded envelope. Bar and seat/post come off completely and sometimes cranks too.

    It's a little more work up-front but worth it for my peace of mind.

    Regarding "secure" lock-ups, I don't trust them. I've managed to sneak our bikes into our room from Montreal to Whistler so far.

    Handy tip: hotel showers make great bike-wash stations!
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

  32. #32
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    If you're planning on renting out there, bring your own tires, or expect to purchase tires out there. I've found the rental bikes were decent with XT/x.9 components, but the tires were either balding or were just crap for the XC trails.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enduramil View Post
    Bull Shiet. There is no such thing as "secure" bike storage in Whistler. I think it was last year that a hotel had it's "secure" bike room raided by theives. Get up to your room.

    Whistler is bike theft central. Do not repeat Do Not leave your bike unattended anywhere in Whistler Village.
    + a million!

    I scour VRBO and Allura Direct for condos that allow you to bring bikes into the units. The "secure storage" in the hotel/condo parking garages are anything but.

    Rent from a shop. I rented a Podium from Fanatyk last August while Marz was rebuilding my fork and it was like new. Of course, it ruined me for my beat up '06 Uzzi. A buddy rented a Kona from WBP and it was really clapped out.

    I always box my bike and I'm about 70/30 for managing to avoid charges on AC. Westjet's not a great option from out here as they just don't have enough flights.

  34. #34
    Living Life Behind Bars..
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    Be careful on 2 things, access to room with bike and rental bikes.

    Always double check you can bring the bike into rooms before you book and get a name. It helps in the situations were we have been told no to offer up in advance your own blanket that the ' clean ' bikes will be left on while in the room. vrbo.com usually lists locations with this a yes or no option.

    Second point I have had good and bad bike rentals so I always ask what year the bike is and the condition. Be prepared to test it before you leave the shop on day 1 not just set up but the shocks, brakes gears everything.

    We did a Telluride to Moab 6 day hut to hut a few years ago and the Intense Spider 29'er I had a rear swingarm bearing that was shot on day 2 no chance of a replacement no chance of a shop not much fun to listen to a squeaky, loose bike for 6 hrs a day.

    I like to bring our own bikes and used to rent the bike suitcase from velotique but ended up buying 2 and have had no issues with any airlines and lost cargo and we have gone all over the place from the US to Costa Rica to Europe etc.
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  35. #35
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    If you are in Whistler for a week or more. Make sure to do a Twoonie race put on by WORCA. It's worth it.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enduramil View Post
    If you are in Whistler for a week or more. Make sure to do a Twoonie race put on by WORCA. It's worth it.
    The Twoonies and Phat Wednesdays are great...but you need to be a WORCA member to participate and it's $45.

    Bike lockers in hotels are not safe in Whistler. If you can't bring your bike into your room (most hotels say no, you need to sneak it in) then try to change reservations.

  37. #37
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    Bring your own ride.

    I've travelled a fair bit with bikes; Jamaica, Switzerland, around Ontairo and Quebec and my rule of thumb for bring or rent is this:

    If its a bike holiday, bring your own ride, if its a family or business trip and you plan to squeeze a ride in rent.

    I set up a guide, shuttle and rental with endlessbikes in North Van at the end of a business trip to Vancouver last year and it was awesome, no bike packing hassel and the brand new RM Flatline I rented was great.

    Cheers,
    G
    Graham Seaman
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    Toronto Off-Road Bicycle Association

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by shirk View Post
    I fixed your post.

    The right bike is more important than your own bike.

    I am going to Peru next summer for a DH trip, I won't be taking my hardtail or my all-mountian bike, I'll be building up a specific bike just for the trip. The right bike.
    Hey shirk! Hope you are coming to ride with us, that way you will ride the real DH trails! Don't miss the biggest descend on earth with 3,800m vertical!! (12,470ft) all on a singletrack!
    Riding the best singletracks on earth!
    www.inkasadventures.com

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by inkasadventures View Post
    Hey shirk! Hope you are coming to ride with us, that way you will ride the real DH trails! Don't miss the biggest descend on earth with 3,800m vertical!! (12,470ft) all on a singletrack!
    We've booked with Sacred Rides from Fernie BC.

  40. #40
    Real Mountain Bikers!
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    We will see in Peru then! Great!! Coming alone?
    Better if you bring a 6 inches bike ready for DH. or if you are a shredder, bring your big DH bike!
    Cheers,

    Wayo
    Riding the best singletracks on earth!
    www.inkasadventures.com

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by inkasadventures View Post
    We will see in Peru then! Great!! Coming alone?
    Better if you bring a 6 inches bike ready for DH. or if you are a shredder, bring your big DH bike!
    Cheers,

    Wayo
    Six of us have booked the DH trip for June 2012. Took advantage of the early booking and group savings.

    We'll all likely be on FR/DH bikes.

  42. #42
    Evil Jr.
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    Be wary of anyone offering you ayahuasca. I hear it does all kinds of weird things to your bodily functions.
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

  43. #43
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    I'll stick to the Pisco Sours.

  44. #44
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    oh yes, he is a shredder for sure... so i heard...

  45. #45
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    I'll be posting more about my trip later, but I figure I can answer this now.

    Cycling was not the sole purpose of my trip, 3 out of 13 days were to be spent riding. Although it would have been logistically possible to bring my own bike, it was nice not having to transport it.

    My rental bike was a 2011 Specialized Rockhopper SL, Euro spec, with a Suntour fork, Deore drivetrain, and Shimano hydraulic brakes. The bike was in like-new condition, and was excellently tuned. The fit was fine. To tailor it to my liking, I added a second bottle cage, rotated the handle bars / controls to suit my liking, and made adjustments to the saddle height and angle. I also swapped the cheesy platform pedals for some SPDs.

    The bike was very well suited for the easy / moderate terrain I was to be riding.

    So, for some notes.
    If you are used to something different, consider bringing it. Of course you will likely bring your clipless pedals, but don't necessarily stop there. Personally, I have been using Ergon grips for years on my mountain bike. At the end of day 1 on the rental, my hands were sore. It was not awful, but it was not something I am used to. The Specialized saddle worked well for me, but had it not, a sore butt would not have made my days more enjoyable. I would not rule out packing your own saddle if you have some long days on the bike planned.

    My sister rented the same bike (smaller size). The only change she made to the bike before rolling out was adding her SPD pedals. She missed her Ergon grips, and would have preferred her own (much more padded) saddle.

    Final note. If the rental comes with an under-saddle-bag with a spare tube and such, make sure it is not rubbing on your monster thighs, and ruining your expensive cycling clothing.

    Edit. Also worth noting, the brakes were set up moto / Euro style with the front brake on the right. That was not a problem for me, but I did need to keep it in mind.
    Last edited by rkj__; 06-06-2011 at 04:38 AM.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkj__ View Post
    Also worth noting, the brakes were set up moto / Euro style with the front brake on the right. That was not a problem for me, but I did need to keep it in mind.
    I ride with my brakes Moto style. I check ahead of time to see what brakes the rental bikes have so I know if swapping them is a simple matter of 4 screws.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enduramil View Post
    Frak Air Canada. Westjet.. never charged.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=425479
    $50 is cheap.
    I went to the netherlands a few years ago and KLM charges 150 of the local currency when you travel with a bike.

    that means
    150 CDN to take it there.
    150 Euro to bring it home. (at the time that was almost $300 CDN)

    I raised a stink, wrote nasty letters, everything, and got no reason for the rediculous charge or any sort of a refund. what a bunch of crooks.
    In turn..... I will never fly KLM again.

  48. #48
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    Update.

    Less than three weeks until I leave for Whistler. I've decided to bring my own bike. I'll be bringing the YETI ASR.



    I'm sure a little more suspension would be better, but me and this bike get along well (now). Only difference is that I'll throw on a set of 'training wheels' Mavic 317/XT or Mavic Crossrides just so I don't feel bad about abusing my 240/420R's (even though they handled a crap load of abuse). What sealed the deal was 1) having a bike when I arrived. 2) Not worrying about renting 2 bikes, as I will be renting a DH bike for some park riding, and the other will be sitting there unused for a couple days. 3) riding a bike I know is in tip top shape, 4) riding a bike I am familiar with and it's a sweet YETI. 5) I'm staying in a condo that from what has been described has no 'Front Desk'. From everything I've read, it's easy to just bring the bike into the room. This sealed the deal.

    Just went out and bought a new Deuter Pack so I can ride all day in comfort. Lukey is hooking me up with a travel case. I'm excited. I'll do my best to provide a solid photo report and some tall tales.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    Update.

    Less than three weeks until I leave for Whistler. I've decided to bring my own bike. I'll be bringing the YETI ASR.

    I'm sure a little more suspension would be better, but me and this bike get along well (now). Only difference is that I'll throw on a set of 'training wheels' Mavic 317/XT or Mavic Crossrides just so I don't feel bad about abusing my 240/420R's (even though they handled a crap load of abuse). What sealed the deal was 1) having a bike when I arrived. 2) Not worrying about renting 2 bikes, as I will be renting a DH bike for some park riding, and the other will be sitting there unused for a couple days. 3) riding a bike I know is in tip top shape, 4) riding a bike I am familiar with and it's a sweet YETI. 5) I'm staying in a condo that from what has been described has no 'Front Desk'. From everything I've read, it's easy to just bring the bike into the room. This sealed the deal.

    Just went out and bought a new Deuter Pack so I can ride all day in comfort. Lukey is hooking me up with a travel case. I'm excited. I'll do my best to provide a solid photo report and some tall tales.
    Good decision!

    I've been back from WBP for a few weeks now and loved having my own bike. We rode mostly trail in the valley due to weather and had an awesome time. Our condo unit had a small 'lobby' in the entrance just before the stairs so the bikes stayed there rather then in the rooms. We had picked up a roll of plastic at the Home Depot in Squamish just in case but didn't need it.

    Having a familiar ride there made it easier to hit technically challenging trails period. I would have been very hesitant on some of the terrain with unfamiliar gear.

    I picked up a cardboard box from Cyclepath on the Danforth and it worked out fine taped up with Tuck Tape, I just cut it up for recycling when I got back. I'll never rent a case for a trip out West again, this was cheaper (free) and just as secure once I packed up everything around the bike (clothing, armour, shoes, etc.)

    We picked this up at one of the bike shops in the village:

    http://www.quickdrawpublications.com...n%20Biking.htm

    Which proved extremely useful, I could enter the trail head into the GPS so we always knew where we were going and what we could link up with at the end of a trail. It's not perfectly up to date, but worth the cost easily.

    Have fun!!

  50. #50
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    Oops, wrong post.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    Update.

    Less than three weeks until I leave for Whistler. I've decided to bring my own bike. I'll be bringing the YETI ASR.
    That couch is nice. I know some friends in Whistler that would help you cover that thing in beer.

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