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  1. #1
    humber river advocate
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    jiffy pop hacked

    while riding mountain bikes

    got my butter and pan...



    spread it out...



    add corn



    spread it out



    cover with tin foil



    cook on fire



    mmmmmm pop corn

    broadcasting from
    "the vinyl basement"

    build trail!

  2. #2
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    I see your popcorn and raise you a leg of lamb. (while fishing, sorry not biking)

    Getting the oven ready


    Prepping the leg of lamb


    Flipping the leg after 3-4 hours, spent a total of 6-7


    Final product. Was cooked through, but not only warm. Open fired it for 30 minutes.


    Next night we had ribs


    Followed by a fish dry. I love being a backcountry chef!

  3. #3
    humber river advocate
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    mmmmm looks good!
    broadcasting from
    "the vinyl basement"

    build trail!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
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    across the river from each other??

  5. #5
    Steady Creepin'
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    That fish looks sooo good.. nothing beats a freshly caught shore luch (especially if it's walleye!).

  6. #6
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by LuMach
    That fish looks sooo good.. nothing beats a freshly caught shore luch (especially if it's walleye!).
    Sorry it's pickerel not walleye.

  7. #7
    humber river advocate
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    can't wait for pickerel season up in timmins this year!
    broadcasting from
    "the vinyl basement"

    build trail!

  8. #8
    Steady Creepin'
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    Heh, funny enough, I actually know it as pickerel too, but used "walleye" because I thought that was the more widely known name. Still, either way it's the best eating freshwater fish IMO... although a friend of mine who spent some time working up in Nunavut claims that arctic char puts it to shame. Never tried it myself though.

  9. #9
    I dd what you see there.
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    For me it's all about the Port Dover Perch.

    For some store bought home creations

    Catfish with Fish Crisp "Gourmet" - Jamaican Jerk flavour - Baked

    and Salmon or Rainbow Trout with Fish Crisp Gourmet" Maple Smoke flavour - pan fried

  10. #10
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    Pickerel is the best fresh water fish, few will deny that. Perch is almost identical and really good. And never tried artic char, but smoked whitefish is awesome, but in a different category.

    And don't get me going on fishing, especially back country canoe/fishing trips.

    Campsite 60 km south of Chapleau. 40 km of logging road, 10 km of 4x4 road (or intense Subaru road), 5 km of paddling, 0.5 km of portaging. Right on a class 4 rapid, fishing from shore brought in some nice ones. Great 4 days on that river system jumping rapids. Catch them, clean them, eat them. (You can see some corn soaking in the back ground ready for the fire)



    Chapleau river 30-40 km north of Chapleau where we started. 5km of paddling, 4 portages and 2 days of straight rain. Though I caught my best pickerel the next day (I say best, cause it was a 7lb on an ultralight with 4lb line)



    Big fat large mouth on a 4 day trip last spring in around Haliburton. (I know, not open, but the river system, by the ministry publications had brook trout, which were open, though when I pulled this out, followed by a smaller 3lber, I knew I wasn't getting trout)



    Moose we watched on that trip.



    The picture doesn't do justice, but the extents I'll go through to get to fishing holes, well, I really need an old 4x4.

  11. #11
    Steady Creepin'
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    Amazing pics, CptSydor..

    Fishing is actually an activity I've kinda gotten away from in the past couple years for no particular reason, I used to be obsessed with it though. Definitely gonna put it back in the outdoor activity list soon though.

    Nice largemouth btw..

  12. #12
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    I grew up in a fishing family. Summer and most vacations involved fishing in some manner. Once I started post secondary education, I lost it for about 8 years, then once I wasn't a student anymore, I got back into it. I grew up on the great lakes in boats, but now it's mostly in a canoe in the north, though not nearly as much as I would like.

    Now I want to go fishing, May 24 can't come soon enough.

  13. #13
    9 lives
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor
    I grew up in a fishing family. Summer and most vacations involved fishing in some manner. Once I started post secondary education, I lost it for about 8 years, then once I wasn't a student anymore, I got back into it. I grew up on the great lakes in boats, but now it's mostly in a canoe in the north, though not nearly as much as I would like.

    Now I want to go fishing, May 24 can't come soon enough.
    I grew up in Timmins and the pictures you posted are so typical of the lifestyle and landscape. I remember on a few occasions when moose would walk through the downtown (now bears are found in peoples back yards) We go back each year for blueberries and my 9 year old nephew catches the pickerel

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious
    I grew up in Timmins and the pictures you posted are so typical of the lifestyle and landscape. I remember on a few occasions when moose would walk through the downtown (now bears are found in peoples back yards) We go back each year for blueberries and my 9 year old nephew catches the pickerel
    My parents are from the Sudbury area (well my mother can claim such places as Gogma as 'home' and her family pioneered much of the western French river area). Even though I grew up in S. Ontario, I spent much of my life in that area. My parents are back now and own some land outside of Sudbury that is 'prime' blueberry property. I've officially retired from serious blueberry picking for the health of my back, but my dad can pick with the best of them and we always get sent home with liters upon liters. I usually throw him my excess pickerel from my trips in exchange.

    I would move there in an instant, but life just ain't working that way right now.

  15. #15
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    I am partial to Bass.


    Deep in The Massasauga a shore lunch.


    My grandfather did trips into the same spot for opening weekend for over 30 years.

  16. #16
    9 lives
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    We bought a few quart baskets of blueberries in Sudbury 2 years ago .. definitely the Blueberry hub. When biking in the Timmins area we can stop and eat blueberries by the handful. Just can't beat them for the antioxidents.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor
    I grew up in a fishing family. Summer and most vacations involved fishing in some manner. Once I started post secondary education, I lost it for about 8 years, then once I wasn't a student anymore, I got back into it. I grew up on the great lakes in boats, but now it's mostly in a canoe in the north, though not nearly as much as I would like.

    Now I want to go fishing, May 24 can't come soon enough.
    We are trying this place out May long weekend.

    www.waterfallslodge.com

    fish on

  18. #18
    namagomi
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor
    ..

    That is a beautiful fish. Not sure how you managed to pack in a leg of lamb... was that day 1? I would be a bit worried tromping about in the bush with a leg of lamb stuck to my back and the remains of blueberries allover me! However... that is just me. This is the cloest i have come to lamb:



    Also, my jiffy pop always gets a bit burned... somewhat frustrating after the effort to drag it around!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrik
    That is a beautiful fish. Not sure how you managed to pack in a leg of lamb... was that day 1? I would be a bit worried tromping about in the bush with a leg of lamb stuck to my back and the remains of blueberries allover me! However... that is just me. This is the cloest i have come to lamb:
    The leg of lamb was not on a canoe trip (well there was a canoe on the trip, but also a 14 ft aluminum with a 20 hp). It was still pretty far back into the bush however. On canoe trips/backpack trips, first nights dinner is always a huge rib steak each, so not much different. I try to stay in extra good shape just to haul the extra.

    Presumably you are taking about bears and I'm not overly worried about any of that however. Regardless if you are carrying a leg of lamb, or freeze dried vegan corn dogs, The moment you start cooking anything, if there is a bear around, it will know you have food, and if it's curious, it's coming to see what is going on. So unless you are fasting for the trip, you will have something they want, so don't try to get in the way of that. Keep the campsite clean and keep your food out of your (and preferably) away from your tent.

    I've only ever had a bear come through my site once. Food was 50 yards away on a point, it just came in and out, and when nothing was available left (I was in my tent when it happened around 9-10 pm). Food was untouched away from the site. The day I take a backcountry trip in Grizzly territory, I'll bring the 12 guage, black bear country, just my fishing rod.

  20. #20
    namagomi
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor
    The leg of lamb was not on a canoe trip (well there was a canoe on the trip, but also a 14 ft aluminum with a 20 hp). It was still pretty far back into the bush however. On canoe trips/backpack trips, first nights dinner is always a huge rib steak each, so not much different. I try to stay in extra good shape just to haul the extra.

    Presumably you are taking about bears and I'm not overly worried about any of that however. Regardless if you are carrying a leg of lamb, or freeze dried vegan corn dogs, The moment you start cooking anything, if there is a bear around, it will know you have food, and if it's curious, it's coming to see what is going on. So unless you are fasting for the trip, you will have something they want, so don't try to get in the way of that. Keep the campsite clean and keep your food out of your (and preferably) away from your tent.

    I've only ever had a bear come through my site once. Food was 50 yards away on a point, it just came in and out, and when nothing was available left (I was in my tent when it happened around 9-10 pm). Food was untouched away from the site. The day I take a backcountry trip in Grizzly territory, I'll bring the 12 guage, black bear country, just my fishing rod.
    Ahh, yeah. The oddest thing i've had was ice-cream via dry-ice and i've also had a large steak first day also. The steak was tasty, but the mushrooms didn't make it! Attracting wildlife is something always to worry about. I am mostly joking about the lamb, but I do worry about filleting and cooking fish anywhere near a campsite in the back-country.

    The strangest thing i've ever had enter my campsite was a moose... no bears, but not sure which is more dangerous! I would definitely be packing a rifle or something larger in grizzly country, though i've heard it's pretty impossible to shoot straight if you get charged which is why there are some claims bear-spray is more effective.

    Have you done any tripping into country using only a bicycle?

  21. #21
    Evil Jr.
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    We had a grizzly walk right through our site off the Rockwall Pass in Yoho. It was just after breakfast and all the campers stayed very still. Man, that thing was huge!
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrik
    Ahh, yeah. The oddest thing i've had was ice-cream via dry-ice and i've also had a large steak first day also. The steak was tasty, but the mushrooms didn't make it! Attracting wildlife is something always to worry about. I am mostly joking about the lamb, but I do worry about filleting and cooking fish anywhere near a campsite in the back-country.

    The strangest thing i've ever had enter my campsite was a moose... no bears, but not sure which is more dangerous! I would definitely be packing a rifle or something larger in grizzly country, though i've heard it's pretty impossible to shoot straight if you get charged which is why there are some claims bear-spray is more effective.

    Have you done any tripping into country using only a bicycle?
    Word on the street is that moose is more dangerous than a bear. I wouldn't want to get between either and the direction they wanted to go.

    I always clean fish elsewhere as well. Usually not hard to find another beach or rock outcropping. Except when camped on rapid, if suitable, I clean right on the edge, where everything gets cycled and washed pretty quick and the rest of the fish goes downstream quickly.

    So many pieces of advice on grizzly country, so many factors as well. I have no experience, but my gut says, you are either going to have 1) time to decide and know a bear is in the area, and I'd rather have something with stopping power from more than 15 yards away, or 2) you aren't going to have any time to do much but to **** your pants and fumble, and at that point, there is a side of pepper or lead for the bear. Regardless, odds are slim at best and I doubt I'll ever need to find out.

    I have never taken a bike on any form of trip (except once when we used a bike to shuttle a car 20 km to the end of a 80 km backpacking trek).

    There is however a lake in northern ontario that is accessible by logging road, however it's posted 20-30 km out by the MNR that people using this road past this point to access this lake via motorized vehicles will be in trouble (used to protect an outfitter). That lake apparently have amazing fishing. I have an uncle who keeps telling me that we are parking the truck at that sign, and continuing via bike with canoe on a trailer. Hasn't happened yet, but it's been discussed.

    I think a winter fat bike camping trip would be killer through some snowmobile trail networks.

  23. #23
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    Nobody that rides in the Chilcotins (full on grizzly country) carries any fire power stronger than pepper spray.

    Lots of groups riding up there these days with no incidents. Would hate to be the first statistic, but it's not a huge worry.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by shirk
    Nobody that rides in the Chilcotins (full on grizzly country) carries any fire power stronger than pepper spray.

    Lots of groups riding up there these days with no incidents. Would hate to be the first statistic, but it's not a huge worry.
    We should turn this into a best concealed weapon to carry while riding in case a cougar attacks thread!

    I would never really fear, and would choose to ride/camp/hike canoe with nothing rather than not go out at all. Heck, it even seems weird to think of carrying spray as part of the 'kit'. Rumor has it, one of the photo/moto guys chased of a grizzly right before we came through at transrockies. I've only ever seen one from the side of the road, from a car, mother and cubs, around Prince George.

    But if I was on a canoe trip in a very secluded area, where logistics were minimal to transport, I would tote along something. You never know when dinner might scamper through, you take a wrong turn, or your partner is lily dipping that paddle.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor
    But if I was on a canoe trip in a very secluded area, where logistics were minimal to transport, I would tote along something. You never know when dinner might scamper through, you take a wrong turn, or your partner is lily dipping that paddle.
    My girlfriends brother did this little 9000km self supported kayak trip coast to coast (only person to ever complete it in one season) west to east across Canada unarmed.

    No need to carry any firearms unless you set out intent to kill something.


    www.kayak99.com

    But I see your point on a lily dipping partner. He would deserve a little buckshot in the behind for that.

  26. #26
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    I can completely agree that it is not, and should not be needed. I have no reason to lock my doors at night, but for some reason, I sleep better when they are. It would be totally psychological.

    That trip looks like quite the adventure, kudos to him.

  27. #27
    Team NFI
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    Quote Originally Posted by shirk
    Nobody that rides in the Chilcotins (full on grizzly country) carries any fire power stronger than pepper spray.
    How can you tell it's Grizzly Bear poop?

  28. #28
    Avenger of Evil
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enduramil
    How can you tell it's Grizzly Bear poop?
    Contains bells, and smells like pepper...
    Last edited by 1440Brad; 03-28-2011 at 09:16 PM.
    Famous Last Words....."Hey, watch this!!"

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