3 Cyclists Hit on Gore- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    3 Cyclists Hit on Gore

    Some of us here are roadies as well. I ride that road all the time. This sucks.
    Three cyclists struck in hit and run | Sympatico.ca News

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    There's even a decent size shoulder there too.
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

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    That goon/family-man Sultan Ahmed's trial took place just last week I think. He also fled the scene before later deciding to surrender. Hit-and-run drivers are mice, not men.

    Just getting a road bike put together this spring, it's been 10 years since I did any road riding. I can't wait... I think.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kay. View Post
    Just getting a road bike put together this spring, it's been 10 years since I did any road riding. I can't wait... I think.
    Good luck. If you're looking for nice quiet roads, I highly recommend the greater (as in rural) Hamilton/Brantford/Burlington area.
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    Actually, I think motorists around the Bolton area are pretty good to cyclists. I've only had a handful of bad encounters road riding in my 9 years here.

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    That really sucks. I do a bit of road as well and a lot of times feel safer bombing through the trees, rocks and roots than on our roads. I am finding that the roads around Milton are getting way busier than they were a few years back. It is not as relaxed as I remember. There seem to be more cars and cyclists. Did one ride up in Caledon, and it seemed quite a bit less busy, though cars seem to be going faster when they were around. It might be time to get some signs in some of these well-traveled area roads reminding motorists that cyclist use these roads and to watch out for them. Not at lot of money to be spent or lines to paint in or anything. The signs go up on selected routes and people get used to them. Cyclist may choose to ride the route because of the signs and motorists would notice the signs and cyclists. It's all about building awareness. As the population grows, we will have to do more and more to ensure the safety of cyclists.

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    Just another day in the deadliest province if your not in a car.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kay. View Post
    He also fled the scene before later deciding to surrender. Hit-and-run drivers are mice, not men..
    Likely to sleep off the booze and to not be charged with DUI.

    Brutal story...I hope the cyclists all make a speedy recovery
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    Gore is a pretty dangerous road to ride. Visibility is terrible because of all of the undulations in the road, and cars tend to speed excessively. None of this excuses the conduct of the driver involved in this accident, nor does it in any way make the cyclists responsible for this accident. My only point is that if you are heading out north from Bolton, either Duffy's Line or Innis Lake Road is a far safer bet.

    Be careful out there everyone....
    Strava made me do it....

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    as a resident and 4 season cyclist of caledon (road/offroad)... the level of complete ignorance shown by riders to the flow of traffic, riding side by side over blind hills, stopping in a group on a blind hill, riding in a truck traffic road, riding without reflective markings at dusk. i'm not surprised this has happened.

    while the facts of this incident are not clear, one thing i can say is that roadies need to be educated how to ride safely and share the road in more rural areas.
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    I totally agree that there needs to be more education for cyclist on road safety but it seems at this point there is always debate on what's right and what's not. For example, I find that riding 2 abreast is the safest way for a group to ride as is forces motorists to treat us like the slow moving VEHICLES that we are (like they'd treat a tractor) and not like bicycles that they can squeeze between them and the yellow line when a car is coming the opposite direction. I'm going to start making it a point to try and educate the members of our club as I've noticed some people are oblivious and simply don't know.

    That being said, I'd never take a group on a long stretch of very busy highway for a group ride regardless of whether we have the right....If you don't feel safe, odds are it's not.

    Both parties definitely need more education but it's no excuse for hit and runs and the way the system lets drivers go with a fine and some points on their license for killing or injuring a cyclist.

  12. #12
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    I read an interesting submission to the Flamborough review last week, I think it somewhat applies here...

    Dreaded ‘peloton’ ignores rules of the road | FlamboroughReview.com

    Dreaded ‘peloton’ ignores rules of the road
    Re: Cycling rules for a safe summer, Community Voices, may 17
    On cycling etiquette and road safety G. Schmidt didn’t mention the one thing that is increasingly causing tension between cyclists and motorists on Flamborough roadways: the practice of riding two or more bicycles abreast on the road – the dreaded “peloton.”
    From the cyclists’ point of view. there is perceived safety in numbers, camaraderie, drafting and lack of clarity from the Highway Traffic Act.
    From the motorists’ point of view, there is an awkwardly slow moving blur of tanned calf muscles creating an impedance ahead that must be passed.
    Time-honoured etiquette presumes that the slower cyclists should fan out into single file to the right so that motor vehicles can pass safely to the left.*City of Hamilton By-Law (46) for bicycles dictates that all bicycles must be ridden as close as practical to the right hand curb or roadway edge, and only in single file, except while briefly passing.
    Lately, I have encountered larger and larger pelotons riding continuously two and three or sometimes more abreast and five or more deep on Parkside Drive, failing to stop individually at stop signs or before making a left turn, occupying an entire lane, and refusing to yield to the faster motor vehicles behind.
    Perhaps those colourful shorts and decalled aerodynamic helmets are too tight because they seem to keep some riders from remembering the rules of the road.*Just last weekend we witnessed what could have been a serious collision with some motorists fed up, trailing the peloton attempting to pass in the opposite left lane, and the long peloton attempting a sudden and unsignaled turn to the left.*A potentially fatal T-bone collision was narrowly avoided, and there was enough blame to pass all around.
    It struck me that the peloton acted as a mob with unreasonable hubris, and the motor vehicle drivers as encountering a bewilderingly unpredictable, colourful, new life form.
    I like how it was written, the author makes a good argument for common sense...

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    I don't live in Hamilton but I feel that bylaw puts cyclist's safety in jeopardy and helps to encourage motorists to pass us at the same time traffic is coming from the opposite direction because they think they can fit. Something that I've never had happen riding 2 abreast.
    It may 'inconvenience' drivers for a few seconds but I think it's the safest option if there is no bike lane as a buffer. To me, that's common sense...

  14. #14
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    Messages from motorists try to teach some other road user group the rules of the road is one day going to result in me putting my head through my keyboard.

    Basically, they demand that cyclists follow the letter of the law (which they themselves ignore), unless the rules say they have to yield to said cyclists.... then the rule of the jungle applies.

    Riding 2 abreast is a perfect example of a safe, legal method of operation that incessant motorist whining has made taboo. It's a odd line of reasoning that has brought us to think that the empty seat beside a driver in a wide-ass car has a more valid claim to lane space than other road users on narrow vehicles.

    As for the cause of this accident? We'll, I'll offer the counterpoint and guess he hit them on purpose to "teach those ghey spandex guys a lesson!"


    Why so harsh? Well, I ride all year in Rob Ford's Toronto, after all.
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    2 abreast is different than 4-5 across with 7 deep... When I pass a pair of cyclists, I feel a lot more comfortable leaving 10' of space beside my car as opposed to leaving 18" of space to the outside guy in a peloton... Contrary to what many think, running over a guy on a bike is pretty far down on the lists for most motorists.

    I like Rob Ford... Something about getting himself elected in a city full of people that hate home is unique.

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    Motorists have long abused the privilege of passing cyclists who are alone or in single file, to the point that the so-called 1 metre concept is now approaching reality in law. It should not be necessary to write something like that down as law. But, it seems that it is necessary. In a world where it is necessary to write something like that down, I'd say it's fair game to ride two abreast. The onus is on motorists to make the first move here. Has anyone ever noticed that motorcyclists always ride out by the line when alone, and they commonly ride two abreast and form pelotons in large groups. As long as a motorcyclist doesn't feel safe when surrounded by cagers, neither should a cyclist.

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    The road is a finite width. The more space a cyclist wishes to have ceded to them by a motorist the further they should be riding in the gutter. Simple math. i.e. if you want cars to obey the 1m rule and there is more than 1m to the curb/shoulder at your right, move over or STFU.

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    I've never thought the 1 meter rule makes much sense. I'm not gonna freak when a Honda Civic with a relative speed of 10kph passes 99cm from my handlebar. And a semi-truck with a relative speed of 90kph, in the rain, passing at a distance of 101 cm is not going to make me feel the joy of road safety.

    And of course the problem with ceding room to facilitate passing is that groups of cars tend to pass incrementally closer than the car in front of them. I'm riding in the right tire track, I move a bit right to let a compact car pass with his 1 meter buffer, and then the minibus behind him will pass me at a distance of 10 cm, and I'm already against the curb.
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Todd- View Post
    I read an interesting submission to the Flamborough review last week, I think it somewhat applies here...

    Dreaded ‘peloton’ ignores rules of the road | FlamboroughReview.com
    I am strongly in favour of the dreaded péloton, especially when there is a mix of inexperienced and experienced cyclists. However, I am also in favour of the péloton behaving courteously: Riders in the rear calling out when vehicles wish to pass, riders ahead signalling when they can see that it is safe to pass, and everyone moving over to allow a pass.

    In other words, the péloton behaves like a slow-moving vehicle that does its best to allow faster vehicles to pass it when safe for all concerned.

  20. #20
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    Sounds like there were only 3 cyclists in this group. This is not a case of a large peloton taking up the road.
    Strava made me do it....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swerny View Post
    Likely to sleep off the booze and to not be charged with DUI.

    Brutal story...I hope the cyclists all make a speedy recovery
    This is a problem not limited to cyclists or even Ontario... The penalties for leaving the scene are far less severe than DUIs, meaning it makes "more" sense to flee an accident than stick around if you've been drinking.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    Sounds like there were only 3 cyclists in this group. This is not a case of a large peloton taking up the road.
    they could have been riding 3 across, we don't know. for those that want to ride double, the sight lines to see cyclist over a hill is limited. the motorist is not going to cross the solid yellow on the hill. actually he is going to pull a little to the right. the motorist at 80kmph is traveling at 22 meters a second. think what it would take to stop or change direction in 1 second... not a good idea playing chicken with something moving at that speed or relying on their split second driving reactions for your safety.
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    Quote Originally Posted by veteran_youth View Post
    The road is a finite width. The more space a cyclist wishes to have ceded to them by a motorist the further they should be riding in the gutter. Simple math. i.e. if you want cars to obey the 1m rule and there is more than 1m to the curb/shoulder at your right, move over or STFU.
    Except that there have been studies that indicated that cars tend to give the same amount of clearance to the bike being passed as the bike has given to the curb. Hugging the curb actually encourages the car to pass closer to you, with the associated increase in risk of collision. I will agree that that doesn't mean being a jerk and taking up more space than is necessary, but if I feel that cars are starting to squeeze me into the curb it means that I'm riding too close to the gutter and I will move further out into the lane.
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    According to some woman a month ago I deserve to be clipped and run over because I ride a bike.

    And as a outside obeserver meaning only been here 10 years. Ontario drivers are arrogant arse clowns You lot are way to aggressive and will do anything to get even that extra 1 foot of distance even if you had to run down your own brother. It's not the traffic laws or vehicle size. It's your attitudes that cause the problem.

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    Attitude indeed. Which is worse: the handful of knockdowns over a lifetime of cycling, or the countless, thousands, of routine infractions where a right-of-way is neatly taken with absolutely no harm done to anyone. "I timed it perfectly" said one gentleman driving a Cadillac, who hadn't realized that I feathered the brake to avoid the knockdown. No harm done to anyone. No one in our modern society would dream of taking 5 cents from a panhandler, but pushing a cyclist out of the legal right-of-way with a car is pretty much the same thing. If you read between the lines of the Peck report, it is apparent that this attitude was beginning to bother Mr Sheppard.

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    Here's one thing that burns me. These same people who will bemoan other zealots who use force and violence against others for whatever point. Do not grasp that they are behaving no different when operating a car in the manner to get what they deem is their's and will use their car to force that point.

    You know... it's amazing how much hand wringing and whoa pours out when you have all those shootings in Toronto. Yet no one cares when people are killed by cars. So... by this view it's bad for me to kill some one with a fire arm and will be much haranging in the papers. But if I mow him down in a car no one will care.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by dskunk View Post
    I will agree that that doesn't mean being a jerk and taking up more space than is necessary, but if I feel that cars are starting to squeeze me into the curb it means that I'm riding too close to the gutter and I will move further out into the lane.
    Which I have found works with passive motorists... I know some of them get mad, but they bite their tongues and change lanes to pass. But within the span of 50 or 60 cars I will get one hyper-aggressive guy who just isn't going to take this full-lane-on-a-bike crap and will either verbally threaten me, or just plain push me into the curb with his car. In terms of physical contact from overtaking cars, this has happened to me more than accidental clips and mirror-slaps.



    So what I'm saying is, both approaches to lane position have failed me, and other combinations using variable road position have been only marginally more successful.

    It's kind of embarrassing to disclose that after 15 years of daily commutes, all those thousands of miles on the road (and hundreds of hours spent on the interwebz discussing it with everyone from Forester to Hurst), I have no friggen idea where to position the bike on an arterial road to avoid getting clipped by cars. I mean, it's kind of a basic principle of urban road riding.



    Edit: Sorry, almost forget to add today's hit-and-run:

    Toronto News: Police officer on bicycle hit at Hwy. 400 and Finch - thestar.com
    Last edited by ghettocruiser; 06-09-2012 at 09:16 PM.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post

    Edit: Sorry, almost forget to add today's hit-and-run:

    Toronto News: Police officer on bicycle hit at Hwy. 400 and Finch - thestar.com
    i know the area well... they where riding side by side at night.... not a good idea.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enduramil View Post
    According to some woman a month ago I deserve to be clipped and run over because I ride a bike.

    And as a outside obeserver meaning only been here 10 years. Ontario drivers are arrogant arse clowns You lot are way to aggressive and will do anything to get even that extra 1 foot of distance even if you had to run down your own brother. It's not the traffic laws or vehicle size. It's your attitudes that cause the problem.
    Although personal stories are good to share here are some facts:

    According to CIHI

    Cycling injuries are by far the most common injury during the summer

    Annual number of cycling injury hospitalizations remained relatively stable between 2001–2002 and 2009–2010, the number of cycling-related head injuries decreased significantly, from 907 to 665, over the same period

    Between 2001–2002 and 2009–2010, hospital admissions for cycling injuries were most common among children and youth younger than 20 (42%), with 10- to 14-year-old boys hospitalized the most frequently.

    Among the provinces, in 2009–2010, cycling injury age-adjusted hospitalization rates were highest in British Columbia and Alberta and lowest in Ontario and Nova Scotia.

    http://www.cihi.ca/CIHI-ext-portal/p...NJURY_09-10_EN

    Based on the results of the hospital collected data, focus for safety should be on cycling during summer, and finding better ways of protecting children,
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    It's kind of embarrassing to disclose that after 15 years of daily commutes, all those thousands of miles on the road (and hundreds of hours spent on the interwebz discussing it with everyone from Forester to Hurst), I have no friggen idea where to position the bike on an arterial road to avoid getting clipped by cars. I mean, it's kind of a basic principle of urban road riding.
    [/url]
    Similar commuting experience, daily since 93 ish. Nowhere is 100% safe eh? We just do what we can. I'm not a fan of taking the lane, most of the time there's no point. I'm also not a fan of riding to the extreme right. Somewhere in between is as good as you're gonna get.

    Best reply yet from a motorist ( in his twilight years ) who was obviously using a phone and texting while blocking traffic by crawling along Sheppard ( by traffic I mean cars and me )
    " Actually I'm reading " !!!!!??
    Cheers, Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by singlesprocket View Post
    i know the area well... they where riding side by side at night.... not a good idea.
    And the motorist was driving impaired and fled the scene after running down a police officer... also not good ideas... also illegal btw.

    Riding 2 abreast: not expressly illegal according to the Ontario HTA.

    We cyclists engage in our fair share of risky behaviour and do lots of stupid things and fail to use common sense, no doubt about it. But in cases like these when the motorist is clearly at fault, and we still point fingers at cyclists saying if they had done this or not done that then they wouldn't have been hit by the careless motorist, isn't that like blaming the rape victim?

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    And the motorist was driving impaired and fled the scene after running down a police officer... also not good ideas... also illegal btw.

    Riding 2 abreast: not expressly illegal according to the Ontario HTA.

    We cyclists engage in our fair share of risky behaviour and do lots of stupid things and fail to use common sense, no doubt about it. But in cases like these when the motorist is clearly at fault, and we still point fingers at cyclists saying if they had done this or not done that then they wouldn't have been hit by the careless motorist, isn't that like blaming the rape victim?
    Thank you for stating what is glaringly obvious.

    I can't believe those comments myself. Sick!


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    Quote Originally Posted by singlesprocket View Post
    i know the area well... they where riding side by side at night.... not a good idea.
    Actually, they were in single file it was still daylight. Where did you get your facts?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    Gore is a pretty dangerous road to ride. Visibility is terrible because of all of the undulations in the road, and cars tend to speed excessively. None of this excuses the conduct of the driver involved in this accident, nor does it in any way make the cyclists responsible for this accident. My only point is that if you are heading out north from Bolton, either Duffy's Line or Innis Lake Road is a far safer bet.

    Be careful out there everyone....
    The secttion of Gore were they were hit is flat and clear of any obstructions. I also ride Duffy's and Innis Lake. Duffy's has lots of rollers which some drivers will argue impedes vision.

    Either way, no excuse to leave the scene of an accident.

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    Quote Originally Posted by singlesprocket View Post
    they could have been riding 3 across, we don't know. for those that want to ride double, the sight lines to see cyclist over a hill is limited. the motorist is not going to cross the solid yellow on the hill. actually he is going to pull a little to the right. the motorist at 80kmph is traveling at 22 meters a second. think what it would take to stop or change direction in 1 second... not a good idea playing chicken with something moving at that speed or relying on their split second driving reactions for your safety.
    Please check out the scene of the accident. No hills. You can see for miles.

    There are terrible drivers and terrible cyclists. The differenece is when somebody gets hurt in a car, most people are shocked and empathetic. When it's a cyclist, many automatically assume they were doing something wrong and deserved it.

    It's pretty safe to safe that most cyclists are also drivers. So it's not as if we get out our cars and become total jerks on a bike. Then again, perhaps the jerks in cars are also the same jerks on bikes.

    My experience is that 95% of drivers especially those in Caledon are considerate towards cyclists. But 5% of them at high speeds and a couple of thousand pounds can do a lot of damage.

    At the end of the day, the driver in this case lost all sympathy from me the moment he abandoned those cyclists after they were hit.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bolton Roadie View Post
    Actually, they were in single file it was still daylight. Where did you get your facts?
    The article in the Star states they were riding along side one another ... I believe that means side by side or beside each other.or 2 a-breast ..at 9:30 pm

    "Const. Rowan Hamlet was struck while cycling alongside another officer around 9:30 p.m., police said. He was taken to Humber River hospital to treat a strained shoulder, scraped forearms and a back injury."

    Have the facts changed?

    And yes it is terrible that the driver left the scene and that should be taken into account.

    Toronto News: Impaired charge laid after police officer on bicycle struck by car - thestar.com
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    My apoligies cyclelicious. Did not notice you were referring to the poilice being run down. You are correct.

    That being said, the times I have seen police on bikes, they are clearly visible. More than your average cyclist.

    Doesn't change the fact the driver was impaired.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    The article in the Star states they were riding along side one another ... I believe that means side by side or beside each other.or 2 a-breast ..at 9:30 pm

    "Const. Rowan Hamlet was struck while cycling alongside another officer around 9:30 p.m., police said. He was taken to Humber River hospital to treat a strained shoulder, scraped forearms and a back injury."

    Have the facts changed?

    And yes it is terrible that the driver left the scene and that should be taken into account.

    Toronto News: Impaired charge laid after police officer on bicycle struck by car - thestar.com
    I realize there were 2 separate accidents: one on Gore and the other one on Finch and 400. The recent accident the cyclists were riding in pairs (the driver of the vehicle was impaired)
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    I agree ghettocruiser. Running down cyclists not good. Runnig down cops? Just dumb!

  41. #41
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    As for the position of the police bikes on the roadway, I think that's kind of academic, given that these are police officers and part of their JOB IS TO STAND IN LIVE LANES AND DIRECT TRAFFIC, often at night, in the rain, at locations where cars typically run into each other.

    So I don't think riding a bike in the car-traveled portion of a roadway qualifies as excessive risk taking.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Although personal stories are good to share here are some facts:

    According to CIHI

    Cycling injuries are by far the most common injury during the summer

    Annual number of cycling injury hospitalizations remained relatively stable between 2001–2002 and 2009–2010, the number of cycling-related head injuries decreased significantly, from 907 to 665, over the same period

    Between 2001–2002 and 2009–2010, hospital admissions for cycling injuries were most common among children and youth younger than 20 (42%), with 10- to 14-year-old boys hospitalized the most frequently.

    Among the provinces, in 2009–2010, cycling injury age-adjusted hospitalization rates were highest in British Columbia and Alberta and lowest in Ontario and Nova Scotia.

    [cannot post links]

    Based on the results of the hospital collected data, focus for safety should be on cycling during summer, and finding better ways of protecting children,
    I'll agree with your first point on summer cycling safety, but I think more information is needed on the second one. The stat that most of the hospitalizations are 10-14 year old boys doesn't indicate severity of injury or what the "cycling injuries" were. That suggests that, for example, car-bike interactions and pushing your limits and falling are binned together. I've nothing to back it up, but that demographic suggests to me that it's not road riding, but likely BMX, mountain biking, etc, and early teen boys being early teen boys (i.e. if it wasn't the bike, they'd find another way to log an ER visit).

  43. #43
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    I was hit by a car June 15

    I slowed down when I cross a greenlight, and I noticed a car which was going to turn right slowed down too,the car was supposed to stop before I cross the road.

    But obviously,the driver didn't look both ways before she stopped.Please check the attached scene photographs.

    My body is OK except that my knee is injured.The bike pedal is broken.

    I am lucky because I was not fast,otherwise I will be hit by the car from the other side again.

    The police was coming in 5 minutes.He asked the driver and me to move to the parking space of a supermarket.

    The police checked the law then told me I was the the one who would be responsible for the accident.He charged me under the Highway Traffic Act 144 (cyclist ride across crosswalk) for $110.00.

    I have to fix my bike by myself and I don't have to fix the car.

    So I went to the court to request a meeting with a prosecutor to discuss the possible resolution of the charge $110.0.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enduramil View Post
    You lot are way to aggressive and will do anything to get even that extra 1 foot of distance even if you had to run down your own brother. It's not the traffic laws or vehicle size. It's your attitudes that cause the problem.
    talking to me?

    you sure there was nothing personal with that lady?

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Although personal stories are good to share here are some facts:

    According to CIHI

    Cycling injuries are by far the most common injury during the summer
    CIHI data shows that cycling injuries are by far the most common injury during the summer from summer sports and recreational activity. <-- that part that you left out is important.

    Given the full context, I'm not surprised to read that cycling injuries are the most common among sports and recreational injuries. Most common injury overall? Not by a long shot. But guess what was? Motor vehicle collisions (not just motor vehicle-bike collisions but all collisions involving motor vehicles) were the leading cause of major injury hospitalizations in Ontario in 2009-2010.

    I'd be interested in some stats that show the ratio of injuries for cyclist compared to other forms of transportation on a per hour or per miles traveled basis. That would give a better sense of cycling risk compared to driving, taking public transport, etc.

    I don't know if those stats exist, but some claim, based indirectly on hospital injury stats, that cycling is no more risky and perhaps even less risky than driving a car.

    Despite all the car-bike carnage I read about in the news and all the near mishaps with cagers during my bike commute to work, I would tend to agree with them.

  46. #46
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    There were a number of studies thrown around on bikeforums back in the day that on a fatality basis, it was more dangerous than driving per mile, but less dangerous per hour.

    Of course, people were also constantly parading out studies that showed overtaking cars to be 5% of bike collisions or less.... and pretty much every car that's hit me (usually gently) has been overtaking, so doubt shall always be cast.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  47. #47
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    I have over 400,000 km behind the wheel, completely accident free. I've never ever been forced to swerve by an outlaw cyclist. The closest I ever came to hitting a cyclist was the first time I saw a guy riding and smoking a joint, on the Danforth. I slowed to look more closely "is that guy really smoking a joint??" and my steering actually veered a bit too close to the guy. Meanwhile, I've had contact with a vehicle about once per 3000 km worth of bicycle commuting. The imbalance between the two sides of my vehicular existence grows more and more distracting as the years go by.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kay. View Post
    ...The closest I ever came to hitting a cyclist was the first time I saw a guy riding and smoking a joint, on the Danforth.....
    The first time? As in "there have been other times you've seen guys riding and smoking joints"? ha ha.
    Last edited by ray.vermette; 06-15-2012 at 01:24 PM.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kay. View Post
    The imbalance between the two sides of my vehicular existence grows more and more distracting as the years go by.
    I'll assure you that despite driving far less than I ride for the last ten years, I have been subject to a number of car accidents that ranged from annoying to violent, and involved vehicles that ranged from small cars to a tractor-trailer, all of which plowed into the back of my car while I was slowing or stopped in traffic.

    Feel better now?
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  50. #50
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    I was thinking about this thread on my road ride Friday evening. After months with no problems, 2 incidents in one ride. Riding on Healy, one young fella in a little honda with those loud tailpipes yells at me "[email protected] [email protected]". OK, no problem, it would hurt more if he called me fat-a$$. The next, was a minivan passes me only to cut me off at a right turn. ( A very typical move by motorists toward cyclists.) I gave him a dirty look, and soccer-dad didn't like that, so I invited him to step out and talk. He started slowing down and stopping on the side of the road, but decided to speed off.
    Who wants to be seen being beat up by a "[email protected]" in a sausage suit eh?

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thatshowiroll View Post
    Who wants to be seen being beat up by a "[email protected]" in a sausage suit eh?
    all these years and i would never have guessed.........huh
    will still call you a fat-a$$ at work though

    back to the topic
    this brings us back to the old discussion about roads designed for the increasing bike traffic out there.
    i've noticed in caledon when they are resurfacing the roads maintained by the region they are adding a wider paved shoulder which is a good thing providing the riders are in single file.
    now if caledon can follow the example that the region of peel is setting by adding this wider shoulder to the roads under there care then roads like the gore will become safer for bike traffic.
    best solution would be paved bike paths running along side the roads but with seperation between the two as is quite common place in europe but probably just wishful thinking as with all the fiscal cut backs going on in the municipalities it would cost a fair bit and i don't think we have the population per km of road they have over there to justify it and pay for it.
    Team Van Go

    the older I get the better I was

  52. #52
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    Team Van Go

    the older I get the better I was

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailtrash View Post
    LOL

    Oh yeah.. who wants to race on the human powered roller coaster?

    Reality check... bike couriers have been riding for years like that because it's their job. The racing is simply a by product of it Interestingly bike couriers in Europe are better paid and actually have company teams. .

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailtrash View Post
    this doesn't help the cycling image
    It shouldn't hurt it either....When someone (in another country no less) uploads a ricer street racing video, do Honda Civic drivers around here feel ashamed?

    How people conduct themselves on public roadways is between them and their local police. We're not all members of some world-wide governing body that can sanction and discipline miscreants.

    And pretty everything on that video has been done, better, previously on youtube.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    It shouldn't hurt it either....When someone (in another country no less) uploads a ricer street racing video, do Honda Civic drivers around here feel ashamed?

    How people conduct themselves on public roadways is between them and their local police. We're not all members of some world-wide governing body that can sanction and discipline miscreants.

    And pretty everything on that video has been done, better, previously on youtube.
    More often stuff like that gives a small minority a chance to grind their gears and look down their nose at others. To complain how this is offensive and is not what they find acceptable.

    Interestingly... last year in Paved they had an article on the late night LA roadie scene. How a couple of times a week there was a large group training ride through the streets. Gathering of night owls, shift workers, and such to hammer the roads at night with minimal traffic.

    Edit:

    It's funny. Back when I worked as a courier in Van who showed up to Alley Cat's. I recall Roy and the VPD bike squad coming out to race on the wooden figure 8 track was it 97 or 98 I think it was. I think couple showed up to do an Alley Cat as well. No animosity just guys out hammering hard.
    Last edited by Enduramil; 06-17-2012 at 10:36 AM.

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    I didn't see the connection between blazing away over the handlebars and the alleycats... maybe an in joke or something? That is however, the first time I have ever seen a depiction of shooting on the roll. I don't watch a lot of TV or movies or youtube. Is it out there already? Or is this original? In any event, it's way-long overdue for primetime, I think at least 2-4% of all video product should have chase-em/shoot-em-ups that include bikes to reflect the broader population demographic.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kay. View Post
    I didn't see the connection between blazing away over the handlebars and the alleycats... maybe an in joke or something? That is however, the first time I have ever seen a depiction of shooting on the roll. I don't watch a lot of TV or movies or youtube. Is it out there already? Or is this original? In any event, it's way-long overdue for primetime, I think at least 2-4% of all video product should have chase-em/shoot-em-ups that include bikes to reflect the broader population demographic.
    Nope. Looks like a staged scene.

    And as you requested.


    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Pn6ie1zCkZU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

  58. #58
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    All hail the Alley Kat.

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/3hzR4AUIm1I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

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